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TackleTester

painting sequence

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I have question as I begin to gather the supplies to begin carving and painting my cranks. Fisrt:

1. Is the correct sequence for painting: a primer, the paint, then the sealer?

Thanks in advance

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Seal the wood...Min-Wax products work well.

Primer, I use white auto sandable primer.

Paint the belly of the lure, then the sides, then the top.

Add eyes, gills, fins...whatever.

Top coat...eithet etex ot Devcon 2 ton

Remember everything must be centered, line tie and hook eyes,

Weight for ballance.

Probably something I may have missed...oh yea, the lip after sealing the wood.

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MINI WAX will put a sheen on your coating .This sheen will hurt the effects. Its the wax substance in the mix. I 've used the clear coat and it does have a sheen. This is why i only use "COMPONETS"clear coats. I read on the mini wax products that they(mini products) all can cause a sheen. This is not a knock down on what Terrydabassman said! just a warning from the product maker and I'm just passing the bad experience along. We all like to save $$$ on our product buying but sometimes its not going to pan out such as (for example)only shopping at Harbour Fright for everything . Thats just a example ! not a anti HF comment. Of course if you could keep the cost dirt cheap you might make a profit ! or use the best and just make a high quality expensive lure that you'll be proud of. I try to use junk for experiments and buy later at a greater expense.

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Terry,

Does the white auto primer spray thick and sand well? If so what brand do you suggest?

Skeeter

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Hi Skeeter,

I use "Dupli-Color" white sand-able primer I found at Advance Auto Parts Store...fast drying too.

Works great on wood and plastic baits and even "fills" small scratches or blemishes...with added coats when needed.

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Thanks Terry,

Is it a lacquer based primer? Can you get it in a quart and if so how much?

Skeeter

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If you are using lacquer primer you can dip the lure, since you are going to sand the bait and if you thin it just right you will only have to give a rub with a grey scotch-brite pad. Virtually all the old established tackle companies dipped wood baits in white enamel to provide a primer for the the finish.

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Seal the wood...Min-Wax products work well.

Primer' date=' I use white auto sandable primer.

Paint the belly of the lure, then the sides, then the top.

Add eyes, gills, fins...whatever.

Top coat...eithet etex ot Devcon 2 ton

Remember everything must be centered, line tie and hook eyes,

Weight for ballance.

Probably something I may have missed...oh yea, the lip after sealing the wood.[/quote']

??Did'nt know you made wood lures Terry... love to see some of your creations??

On wood lures, dont use minwax or other surface treatments.... use a true wood sanding sealer (two coats if needed) and then to primer.

Use a sandable wood white primer or plastic white primer specifically formulated for your substrate:

Then:

Spray a color base coat (which is typically your belly color) and then work from the sides up to the back;

Then screen or brush your details;

Allow your lure to dry 24 hours (so all moisture is gone). If you have a drying tunnel, you can speed this up. Then top coat with your favorite clear.

Chip

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If you are using lacquer primer you can dip the lure, since you are going to sand the bait and if you thin it just right you will only have to give a rub with a grey scotch-brite pad. Virtually all the old established tackle companies dipped wood baits in white enamel to provide a primer for the the finish.

Amen DANO!!! you got it 100% right!

Chip

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OK fellas, I am starting to get the picture. But this is what I am digging for. I was given a white undercoat by some guy years ago. I shot it through the airbrush. It thinned 4 to 1. It shot beautifully and thick. You could shoot 2 coats and you had a nice layer ready for finish sanding. It sanded like chalk. Just a few hits with light sand paper and the surface was like a babys butt. Paint flowed onto it real well and the results were great. I talked to another person on this site trying to find something like it. They gave me a recommendation but I can't get it here in town. The only problem with the original stuff that I shot was that it sure used up in a hurry. You could fill a 2 oz. jar and it would empty fast. But boy was the finished surface great. Does this sound like the white sandable lacquer primer that you are talking about? I don't think that I want to dip the lure. I have done that before and it sure lays a real thick coating on the bait. A little too much for me.

Skeeter

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Could be the oil base version of kilz, could be white lacquer primer as well. Might be the old white lead used years ago. Fender quitar company used some white fill product (name escapes me at the moment) that they sprayed on quitars in to seal and fill the wood and could be used as a base color for the custom red candy paint jobs. Lacquer primer surfacer will sand like chalk if it is of good quality!

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When I decided to make lures I thought it would be a doddle (easy). Woodworking I know even melting lead getting the weight right no real problem.Painting well I'll manage, wrongly thought I,you need to get the primer to stick, and I hadn't found TU then either no help nowhere to go asked around no one new or wanted to say and it didn't matter which primer it just wouldn't stay on. I had to resort to the old Indian trick taught to me by a white man Before going to sleep tell yourself you will travel all night with the great spirit till you wake with the answer which I did and the answer was STONE CHIP. So I rushed out next day and bought some from DIY store-----utter crap.A week later speaking to a pro car painter he offered me some he had he thought to thin for his use---WELL lo and behold one light touch on the wood takes primer then paint dries in 5 min WOW result you might want to give it a try.

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Sounds good to me Tally. I just wish they had it in a regular can. I would rather shoot it through an airbrush. But, it won't hurt to try it.

Skeeter

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Skeeter, If you are determined to use the the airbrush, drill out the hole on the spray can nozzle with a small drill bit. This will allow the paint to come out in a stream, you can then easily fill the jar or cup. You might have to thin a little maybe not. I do this with many different types of spray can paint and it works great.

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KcDano,

What needle do you use on your air brush when you use the paint from the spray can? What do you need to thin it with? Acetone, paint thinner or something like that?

Charlie M

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Charles, If I do have to thin the paint, I use lacquer thinner in enamel, epoxy or lacquer spray paint. In most cases it will spray straight out of the can. I have 3 old airbrushes all are paasche model H's and are equiped with #1, #3 and #5.

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Sounds good to me Tally. I just wish they had it in a regular can. I would rather shoot it through an airbrush. But' date=' it won't hurt to try it.

Skeeter[/quote']

Picked up a can today and primed 8 baits. So far so good. I will wet sand them hopefully tomorrow. It comes in either white or grey, I bought the white. I will let you know.

Tally

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Carolina Chip wrote:On wood lures, dont use minwax or other surface treatments.... use a true wood sanding sealer (two coats if needed) and then to primer.

Min-wax Polycrylic (along with their urethane) is not a surface treatment, but a finish that is an excellent sealer, especially when one is using a water-based paint system (Createx or Badger acrylics for example). Use like any other sealer, scuffing between the two or three coats and after the final coat. Sanding sealer works great with a solvent-based paint system.

Dean

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First---I use cedar / balsa combination, an idea I received from Coley. I seal the bait with Devcon 2 ton first and then scuff and prime. This is the first time using the plastikote primer, I am hoping to wet sand today. So far so good, if it sands smooth it will be my primer of choice. A local Auto parts store owner told me it was good stuff. We shall see.

Tally

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Tally, I heard you mention that you were using base-coat auto paint. I have been using Dupont's Chroma-base without hardner and thinning it with lacquer thinner . It has worked good for me, no problems. Wondering if you are using hardner?

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Skeeter-

I think you will like that primer. I put 2 coats on and then wet sanded with 1500 paper. It didn't take much and man is it smooooooth!! This will now be my primer of choice unless something else comes up.

KcDano-

You have a pm

Tally

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