goldenshinner

Definition Of "tuned Rod"

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what would most people consider "tuned" rod? a partially sanded blank? or paint added to "add" or subtract action from parts of blank? or just a custom rod that back bone was located and used in the build?

and is tunning mainly on fiberglass rods as graphite cant be sanded

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"Tuned" sounds like marketing hype to me...truly custom is built to your exact specifications from blank power and action, to handle material, length, shape, and diameter, guide material, set up, and spacing, and lastly anything cosmetic you want.

Edited by Lilpdriverrat
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Tuned...in my understanding sets apart custom builds that are purely cosmetic art and color from finely balanced tool...there were some discutions on private group,about who makes most tuned custom rods..what little I gather,is these rods are not regular blanks supplied to builders trade,but custom manufactured from Chinese factory, then further enhanced by some how modifying blanks sensitivity further.. Perhaps by some secret trade method... The tuned would have higher performance characteristics then non nodded blanks...I just don't fully understand what these processes are

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Ohh.and these are ultra light rods..no point of this much Hassel on heavy rod..we are talking about milligram to gram force differences I think...probably more common on European custom builds then amercian

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Also curious in this ultra light range if anyone has Any thoughts on secondary backbone issues..some blanks might show

Edited by goldenshinner

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Anything you do to a blank after purchase will not make the blank better tuned.  Unless there was a paint/finish applied at the factory, any sanding that occurs to the graphite fibers will weaken the blank and cause failure.  You can, however, trim the  tip or but sections to change the action of the blank.

 

The sensitivity of the blank comes from the graphite fibers and the resin used to laminate the fibers.  Anything else added takes away the sensitivity...painting and clear coating included.  handles, reel seats, guides all add weight and reduce senstivity.  The lightist/most sensitive will be just a bare blank.

 

Removing the factory paint/clear coat would increase the sensitivity and make it lighter/more sensitive.

Edited by Lilpdriverrat
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I use a citrus based paint stripper to remove finish with no chance of damaging the blank. Tuning to me would mean they took a bit off the tip, butt or both to get exactly the characteristic they want, but the rod would have to start out to fast in action and to powerful to start with. You can't add speed of power from cutting a blank, in todays market it's hard to not get what you want without hacking up a blank.

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Trimming a blank from the tip will increase its power and its action (make it faster).  Trimming a blank from its butt will decrease its power and slow its action.

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What about using pure mathematics to calculate ideal hormonic spacing, unique to blank after cuting,sanding painting etc.. Equal fractions based on area of rod actually bending..

Edited by goldenshinner

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On 2016-11-20 at 11:17 AM, goldenshinner said:

what would most people consider "tuned" rod? a partially sanded blank? or paint added to "add" or subtract action from parts of blank? or just a custom rod that back bone was located and used in the build?

and is tunning mainly on fiberglass rods as graphite cant be sanded

Goldenshiner check your msil

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On 11/24/2016 at 9:52 AM, Washougal said:

I use a citrus based paint stripper to remove finish with no chance of damaging the blank. Tuning to me would mean they took a bit off the tip, butt or both to get exactly the characteristic they want, but the rod would have to start out to fast in action and to powerful to start with. You can't add speed of power from cutting a blank, in todays market it's hard to not get what you want without hacking up a blank.

 

"I cut it twice, and it's still too short".

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I think rods do have harmonic balance that can help or hurt the sensitivity of of the rod while fishing.  Unfortunately I don't know any way to determine how to space the handle parts and the guides except through exhaustive experimentation to get it optimized.  You can use all the finest components and still end up with a rod that is less than ideal.  And in the real world, you have to mount a reel on it, with specific line to see how it balances in your hand.  If it balances well, that gives you the best chance of detecting bites.  I'm not above adding weight to the butt to do that.

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Interesting...

 

I consider tuning to be a part of your overall design and build, for example my rods for fishing slop and grass have larger eyes.

 

Making sure you use the spline properly to prevent twist (a big deal with a deep cranking rod)

 

Another example is refining guide spacing to prevent bite or shock leader knots from slapping the guides.

 

I've got a friend who spent 4 hours playing with guide size and spacing just for that.

 

Tuning the action by  sanding or removing the finish (blank alterations other then cutting the blank) would be an intense step and beyond my skill set.... 

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And then you change from a 1/4 oz. lure to a 3/4 oz lure or 3/4 to 1 and 3/4 oz and it is entirely wrong action again. It seems to me to be to many varables to be able to calculate how much to sand off a rod blank to achieve an action that can't be defined. Good luck.

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You start sanding on a blank, and I guarantee you'll blow up that blank when built, the blank manufacturers don't do it that way, we can't either.

Where the spline is on a conventional cranking rod with a baitcasting reel is of no importance, the tip down position and the guides facing the direction of tension stabilizes the rod automatically. Spinning rods exhibit the same inherent stability from their guide position under tension. 

No matter what you do, or what position you put the rod in, under tension all rods will return to a guides down position under tension. what type reel and it's position on the rod is not important, spline position is unimportant. The spline myth was proven wrong around 40 years ago, how it continues to survive is beyond me.

Trimming a blank from the tip slows a rod's action , and can only increase tip power changing no other power characteristic of the rod, cutting from the butt does decrease speed and power as Lilpdriverrat described. Blank speed is a ratio of rod flex to rod length, shortening a blank from the tip increases this ratio, and therefore decreases the speed.

Edited by Washougal
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I've sanded or otherwise mechanically stripped (a razor blade works well) several blanks down to the raw graphite or fiberglass when reconfiguring or rebuilding store bought rods.  Been fishing them for years now with no problems whatsoever.  Rod finish and the manufacturer's graphics are just unnecessary to a rod's function and IMO are a detriment to a blank's action.  Finish might offer some minor protection against impact damage but that's about it.

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