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RiverMan

airbrush qstns

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Can someone explain to me:

1. How do you know the when the viscosity of the paint is correct? What indicators do you have when it is too thick or too thin?

2. What does it mean when I see spider-webbing?

2. How can I reduce the amount of paint splattering about when trying to paint a clean edge? I tried reducing pressure, changing tip size and nothing really seems to help completely. I can get "ok" results but not as good as I would like. The paint tends to bounce off where I am painting leaving a film of "small specs" here and there that I don't want.

Any suggestions?

Thank you.

Jed

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Hughesy can answer this much better than I can, but I'll try.

You know, I have never thought much about the viscoity. I try

to thin my waterbase paint to thickness of milk. It will run down

the mixing stick and drip off, all but the last drop, it stays on the stick.

If you get spider-webbing, you could be holding your brush to

close to your work or your paint is much to thin or your air

pressure is way to high.

If you have paint going where you don't want it, angle the airbrush

away from the area you don't want any paint to get on.

As an example, you can paint the top of a bait by spraying

from the center of the bait to the edge in both directions.

Not trying to spray down the middle of the back from front

to rear. I also have never used anything larger than a #1 tip

in my VL an my air pressure seldom exceeds 15#.

Coley

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Thank you Coley for the advice. I spoke with Rich earlier this eve and he essentially told me the exact same thing you just did...well except for the spider-webbing which he felt was caused mostly by the paint being too thick. I find spraying black to be easy, it's the white that is tricky. Oh well, like everything else with this hobby I will continue to beat my head against the wall until I figure it out. :D

Jed

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I think spiderwebing is caused by the paint drying before it gets to the lure. The viscosity goes like this. To thick and it wont spray well or it will splatter. To thin and it will run or it will not cover well. it is just a matter of playing around with your brush and diferent paints. I am sure you will get it.

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Hey Jed,

I get spidering when the paint is too thin, the brush is too close or at the wrong angle. Move back and at an angle to ease it onto the lure. It may help to know that no matter what brand of white craft paint I get from Walmart they all clog the brush quickly and are prone to spidering. Straining the paint thru nylons helps get any brush cloggin clumps out before loading your paint cup. That might help eliminate the "specks" as well.

Tight lines,

Shawn

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The bottom line is Spider webbing is the direct result of too much paint coming through the nozzle, not moving your hand and air gun around and the air pressure blowing the paint around. Results of this is trying to build the paint up too quickly before it has dried and set. Another issue on this is the paint just does not want to adhere to the surface you are painting. 9 times out of 10 though the spider webbing is the result of going to fast with paint buildup by applying TOO MUCH paint too fast and it getting blown around! Cody

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too thin of paint will cause spidering when your painting correctly, most other causes of spidering are when your doing something wrong like holding the brush in one place too long until the paint builds up and spiders. Too thick shouldnt cause spidering, maybe spattering or clogging.

White is always the thickest in water base paints, you have to thin it more than other colors. Because of this sometimes its better to do several thin coats with white to prevent spidering or other problems that can occur putting on too much thin paint too fast.

I use createx auto air with catalyst and a heat gun. I can put on a thin coat and then hit it with the heat gun to dry it in a second or two, then i can put another coat right on.

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Hey thanks guys. Lets see, the spidering is because the paint is too thick got it, no it's because it's too thin...great, wait a minute, it's because I am not moving the brush fast enough. Ok, next time I will make the paint thinner, thicker, and move the brush faster, lol.

Artbrush.....are you saying that I shouldn't be using the WalMart stuff then? I was just getting attached to the .44 cent a bottle stuff too. I am only using it cuz it's the only thing I can buy locally....didn't feel like doing the "mail order" biz again.

Yesterday I sprayed white paint from 9am to 11pm......no kidding, well in all honesty I did take one 5 minute break at which point I ran for the restroom, lol. And for what it is worth, which by the way is next to nothing, I found that the spider-webbing occurred when the paint was too thick, or was it too thin, hmm I forget now. :D

Thanks again to all! :lol:

Jed

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If it spiders when your paint is too thick you really really stay in one place along time and your air pressure is way too high. If you get enough paint in one place on the lure it can spider web thick or thin. Dont sit still too long either way lol. Its all simple, not really, but trial and error is your friend. I'm writing a tutorial on painting so I'll put some common airbrush problems in it.

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I find that hard to understand Cullin8 because I have found that if the paint is too thick it won't spray. Some thinning and it begins to spray but spider webs. A bit thinner yet and it spatters. Too much thinning and it sprays out like water! Like trying to figure out a woman huh. :D

I think the tutorial is a great idea!

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Guys, it sounds as though we all have differnt opions of spider webbing.

What I call spider webing....

When using laquer, is strings out the gun like spraying a can of silly string.

I must go to a slower solvent to let the spray make it the part being painted.

This is because the paint drys as to exits the tip.

There for making a spider web effect in the air not on the surface.

I never gets to the surface.

Try to spray vinal on a hot day once, you will see it.

I have never had this with water basied paint, to humid here for that.

Jed is using a paint I have nevered sprayed, but what is going on is ....

Water basied acylic ?..........

He is going at it to thick, he is getting the boggers on the tip of the needle and that bogger is fly to his bait.

He is on his first week useing a single action HS.

He can spray black with no issues.

It is white that he is have a problem with and via our phone calls its really tip boggers not spider webbing he is dealing with.

Well it splatters which is also from to thick of paint, it builds on the tip cup and cause the pattern to become splatterd, with loss of control of the pattern.

I have been using the same brush for 20 years and am to belive that it is very differnt to the problems with D-action brushes.

At least that is what I have found getting my first d-action a year ago.

They act very different with the same paint mixtures.

Just wish is was not like 2000 miles between us, because I would go over to help him.

I also find it funny that no one has suggested that he buy a viscosity meter cup set, to get used to thinning the paint.

So from the differnt opions here I think ones needs to be working with the exact same type of set up and paint.

Art brush your answer really confuses me.

Could you please define what you are calling spider webbing.

And info. like brush type and paint type.

He was trying to lay white down opauqe in one pass.(finished)

I just keep telling Jed I can not wait untill till he trys some greens.

I have the hardest time with flo. greens.

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Richoc hit the nail on the head: Cob/Spider webbing is the result of improper thinning (not enough) or to fast of thinner for the temp and humidity. They made fluid nozzles and air caps specifically designed to do cobwebbing for custom car finishes back in the day!

Artbrush: Are you talking about freak spots a spray dot with legs?

Jed: If you are having difficulty spraying a clean line thin your paint cut back on the mixture ratio and make several passes. If the paint spatters up the air pressure (if it is properly thinned) and keep the nozzle clean.

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I was talking about spidering (freak dots) where the paint runs out looking like a spider. I suppose that is different than spider webbing which is caused by thick paint where it spatters.

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Ugh :oops: ... sorry for the confusion fellas. I was refering to freak dots as spidering. I shoot with a Paasche using the water based acrylics from walmart. I cannot get the white to cover in one pass either. Thus I thin it down and shoot it at an angle further back...easing it on in a few passes.

Spider webbing as I understand it now is the paint too thick and shooting from the brush like webs. It's a good way to get spatter backs but not for fine gradients.

Artbrush.....are you saying that I shouldn't be using the WalMart stuff then? I was just getting attached to the .44 cent a bottle stuff too. I am only using it cuz it's the only thing I can buy locally....didn't feel like doing the "mail order" biz again.

Jed the walmart craft paints make up the majority of my paint stock with the exception of "Pactra Racing Finish Acryl". It's available at the hobby shop premixed and ready to shoot. I get their color change paints for highlights. Thier "change-blue" looks great over pearl white bellies.

I have a heck of a time too with the florecents needing 2 coats and clogging up the airbrush. 1 coat on a whole batch of lures, dry them, then a second maybe third coat for a bold florecent base.

Tight lines,

Shawn

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