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scoop10

wood

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I've been playing around with lure making for a couple of months now, and have used both cedar bought at Lowe's and basswood that I ordered and bought from local hobby shops.

A custom lure painter many of you know has advised me that untreated cedar will create problems.

Looking for thoughts and suggestions. Do I need to use kiln-dried cedar? If so, where is a good source? Does anyone here treat their own wood? Also, where is a good source to buy basswood in bulk?

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What does he mean by untreated??

If you are buying Western Red Cedar from Lowe's it is ok.

They sell it in 4 x 4, 2 x 4, 2 x 6 and so on.

I have had no problems with it. Seems to me to be very dry.

Don't buy the fence boards, they are wet.

Coley

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I believe what the guy was talking about was white cedar. This is what Poes made their lures out of. I don't know about all cedar but white cedar has an oil to it. ( The oil is said to be toxic ). Kiln drying removes the majority of this oil from the wood. This is what caused the Poes cracking problem years ago. After the company was sold the new owners ordered cedar. It was not kiln dried. They made the baits and painted them. Over the course of a year the oil started to rise up out of the wood and caused the paint and some clearcoat to crack. Some really looked like a spider web. You can still find these baits around. Anyway, Coley is right about the fence cedar. Stay away from it. I have read that you can soak the cedar in mineral spirits for about an hour or so and it will remove the oil. I have been told that you can see the oil on the bottom after soaking. However, they also said that it makes the wood extremely hard. It is a problem working with the wood after this type of treatment. Most board lumber from lumber yards or companies is kiln dried. If you deal with a saw mill, then the wood has probably not been kiln dried.

Skeeter

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Hey Scoop, you made it! Skeeter explained it. I guess I should have explained it as "white" cedar when we were discussing poes cedars and their probs yrs ago. I havent had any experience with western cedar. Glad youre on the TU forum.

KL

www.customluresunlimited.com

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hi guys just thought i would try to help. red cedar is fine we make our baits from cedar. make sure you use a sealer first then prime. when buying wood check the end cut of the board. the growth rins will show. the tighter the rins the closer to the heart wood

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All wood is toxic, just different levels of toxicity :wink:

Ohno dont tell me that, I come home caked in sawdust everyday, I can only imagine how much makes it in the windpipe :|

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:pissed: Jerry wear a dust respirator every day. over time we become sensitized to different woods as we are exposed to them. You really need to be concerned about the fine dust that you can barely see in the air :!: . This stuff will clog your lungs or cause scar tissue to grow over time. It happens slowly enough that you don't notice until it's to late. :(

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When I get into the shop to do some heavy shaping and such I always where a respirator. If you find yourself with a sore throat after working with wood then you need to start wearing one. Paper masks don't cut it.

Skeeter

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you should use a good dust collector, cedar is probably the dustiest wood, a respirator is an exellent idea and a good blower system for paint. we use all of the above. even cutting on the big saw its airborne everywhere

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Thanks for the advice Skeeter. I had been wearing a mask, but I'll take your suggestion. I had definitely noticed the sore throat deal.

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