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DoubleT

Rustoleum Ultra Cover Primer 2X

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I'm making some glide baits from Alumilite resin. I recently purchased several different colors of  createx paint. While I was out the other day I picked up a can of white rustoleum ultra cover primer 2X. Do any of you folks have any experience with it? It says on the can that it bonds to plastic. I'm going to clean the bait up good and give it a shot. Thought that I would check with you guys as well. Also, this is probably a silly question but do I need to sand the primed bait after it drys prior to painting with createx or does it matter? Thanks.

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Edited by DoubleT

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I use it, and it works fine for both plastic and PVC blanks.  I  used it on a balsa bait, too, after I seal the balsa with super glue.  The Createx paints I use bond to it just fine, once it's cured.

I typically do two coats, waiting 15 minutes between coats, and then let them cure for 24 hours.

I spray outside, because it has fumes, and put the wind at my back.  I could spray inside with a respirator, but it's easy to just step outside to do it.

I bring them inside to cure when it's cold in the garage.

I use the X2 Gloss Clear for a top coat, two coats, and follow the same steps.  Works for me.

 

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Thank you sir. Thats what I was hoping to hear. Do I need to sand the primed lure after it has cured prior to airbrushing? If so, I imagine i wouldn't want to sand so much as to remove the primer and reach the resin. Thanks

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On 3/17/2017 at 10:04 AM, mark poulson said:

I use it, and it works fine for both plastic and PVC blanks.  I  used it on a balsa bait, too, after I seal the balsa with super glue.  The Createx paints I use bond to it just fine, once it's cured.

I typically do two coats, waiting 15 minutes between coats, and then let them cure for 24 hours.

I spray outside, because it has fumes, and put the wind at my back.  I could spray inside with a respirator, but it's easy to just step outside to do it.

I bring them inside to cure when it's cold in the garage.

I use the X2 Gloss Clear for a top coat, two coats, and follow the same steps.  Works for me.

 

Mark, I have had good luck with this primer as well but I recall reading on the can that it continues to bond with plastic for seven days.  Do you think this means you should wait that long to paint? It has always worked out that circumstances forced me to wait but I wondered if I needed to.

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I use it and have never waited seven days. I just make sure its completely dry and that depends on how thick I have to put it on. Never had a problem.

 

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A paint like that actually breaks down the plastic at the surface to bond. Something like a fusion. This happens at the surface of the plactic and the underside of the paint. I'm not sure if you need to wait but it couldn't hurt. Organize your work to allow full curing.

Dale

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15 hours ago, metal said:

Mark, I have had good luck with this primer as well but I recall reading on the can that it continues to bond with plastic for seven days.  Do you think this means you should wait that long to paint? It has always worked out that circumstances forced me to wait but I wondered if I needed to.

I have never waited that long, but I do hit the primer with a hair dryer as it's curing.

I only did very light coats on plastic baits, because it has so much pigment/solids in it that it obscures the finer details.

After trying it on plastic baits,  I actually prefer just to dip my plastic baits quickly in clean acetone, and then paint directly onto them with my Createx paints.  Even if I use Wicked White as a base coat, it isn't as thick as the X2 Primer, so more of the scale details show.

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2 hours ago, metal said:

I like the thought of dipping in acetone....clean and prep in one easy step. Thanks all!

 

Be sure it's a quick dip.  Since acetone is a solvent for most plastic cranks, you can melt the crank body, or cause the glue joint between the two halves to open up if you let it soak.

Having said that, I've been dipping my cranks for years, and have never had a problem.   Just be sure you have a good grip on the crank, like a pair of vice grip pliers on the rear hook hanger, and then put a bent out paper clip through the line tie, and hang it with the bill up to dry.  It doesn't take long for the acetone to flash off.   By the time you have the bill masked,  you're ready to paint.

Edited by mark poulson
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