BigBaitB

Air chamber

7 posts in this topic

Does anyone know how they get the air chamber in air tail rattlers or whatever they are called? 316 makes a frog with an "air chamber" in it as well and I'm having trouble finding anything on how to do it. Any help is apreciated

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I cannot be sure how they do it.  I did some experimenting with placing a glass ball/marble in the mold when I poured and then removed it after.  It worked pretty well, but I had problems getting it in the right spot and keeping it there.

I don't know if this will help, but maybe it will give you and idea that might suggest a solution.

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It looks like the air chambers are actually the hollow front appendages (arms) that are bent closed at the elbow.

If the arms were fully extended when molded and molded over dowel pins.

They then could be bent  closed at the elbow and glued.  The whole frog could then be dipped in hot plastic. This would make the arms very durable and further seal the air chambers.

 

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In the 316 frog it is in the body. My idea was to try and find a small plastic air bladder and pour around it. I'm not sure if the plastic will melt them but it's the best I could come up with. Hopefully as time goes on someone will chime in with the best way

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To create air chambers, try going in thru both eyes.

Use two stepped core pins with a tapered transition.  Core pins are common in the injection mold industry.

Pin shape: A larger dia provides the air chamber, a tapered section then a small dia exits the eye.  The pin dia for the eye  should extend thru the mold which finishes with a large dia pull knob outside the mold.

After the frog is molded,  pull the pins and remove the molded part. Next attach the 3D eyes.

A quick dip in hot plastic seals the eyes.

   

 

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On 7/17/2017 at 6:56 AM, fshng2 said:

To create air chambers, try going in thru both eyes.

Use two stepped core pins with a tapered transition.  Core pins are common in the injection mold industry.

Pin shape: A larger dia provides the air chamber, a tapered section then a small dia exits the eye.  The pin dia for the eye  should extend thru the mold which finishes with a large dia pull knob outside the mold.

After the frog is molded,  pull the pins and remove the molded part. Next attach the 3D eyes.

A quick dip in hot plastic seals the eyes.

 

Excellent.  I've done some hollow work for various things, but I really like the idea of going in through the eyes and then covering the holes the way you describe.  If you use a soft plastic eye and soft plastic glue you wouldn't even have to dip.  Dipping works, but I think it kinda ruins the lines of some baits too.

However, I'd like to remind you guys that often when a soft bait is hollow it gets limp and doesn't perform well.  I'm sure most of us have had it happen when we get in a hurry and our technique suffers.  You need to plan your hollow cavities so that you still have plenty of meat to support the bait's shape.

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On ‎7‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 9:05 PM, Anglinarcher said:

It worked pretty well, but I had problems getting it in the right spot and keeping it there.

 

1 hour ago, CNC Molds N Stuff said:

However, I'd like to remind you guys that often when a soft bait is hollow it gets limp and doesn't perform well.  I'm sure most of us have had it happen when we get in a hurry and our technique suffers.

Yep, my problem exactly.

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