DoubleT

Multiple Airbrushes

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I have two airbrushes that I use at my paint station. It seems that most of the baits that I make have at least 4 colors. I am pondering the thought of getting a couple more airbrushes to help speed things along and eliminate color changes. It seems that I spend the majority of my time cleaning between colors than actually painting. Do you guys use multiple airbrushes or do you like myself have one or two and just make the necessary color changes as you paint along?

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we use three brushes.. paasche. brushes are always in thinners,and have a tip blowerécleaner at hand..

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I use two airbrushes with different size tips depending on what is being painted. I always only have one in paint at a time because of dry tip. I'm slow and cleaning tips is more aggravation than cleaning between colors, just my $.02.

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If you are doing large amounts of baits I would suggest bottle brushes like most do. Woodie is one for example, or do assembly type work.

I have three, one at .50, .30 and one that will do .33 / .21. I seem at best with three and honestly like just using two but these are bowl type, not bottles.

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for bottles we use babyfood jars. use the paasche bottle siponswith extended Teflon tube into bottle. shoot 4 ounces at a time. save baby food jars guys,

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I only use one AB and that is a Paasche model H.  To reduce wasting paint, I paint at least 6 at a time, and multiples of 2; because when I put the epoxy coat on, I could reliably clear 2 baits for each batch.  I've found that this is way faster, saves paint, makes the baits consistent. and I have a lot of different styles in the same color to fish with.  

I'm looking to add a gravity feed brush (Paasche Talon) so that I could get fine detail lines.

Edited by snapshotmd

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I use a Badger Crescendo, and keep one as a spare. I found using more than one at a time annoying, but I hate the time lost changing colors. The solution for me was to build a ten lure drying cabinet, and a ten lure painting jig to match. The brush tip does have a penchant to collect paint, so I keep a small brush handy, like the kind surgeons use for fingernails. I just wet the brush and scrub off the paint. The bristles are soft and don't damage the needle tip. 

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I  use 3 , 2 iwatas and a paasche, all are siphon feed with jars, also use urethanes and lacquers for the most part, I like the stuff to dry ...def. speeds things up.

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I've never tried any solvent based paints. The acrylics are fast drying, but it seems the price to pay comes in the form of paint build up on the tip. I've learned to just keep an eye on it. 

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Woody, what sort of receptacle do you use to keep tip in thinners without thinners evaporating ?  Cheers....glider

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We use four at each station. 1 iwata , 3 paasches . iwata for detailed work and paasches for base coat, body color, back and belly.

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I am set up now with 3 paasche talons and a badger bottom feed. Haven't used this set up but im hoping it cuts down on the lost time with color changes. Most of the work I do involves no more than 4 or 5 colors so hopefully it helps. 

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