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johnnytheboy

rounding lure edges

23 posts in this topic

hi there,

i have made the first lure blank today, and i'm gonna start to round it off, someone i know has a router table, is it possible to router the edges or i'm i best just plodding on with a wood rasp, i've never used a router before so i have no idea of what there capabilites are with regards to small object like lures, i fancy giving it a bash i just dunno if unrealistic

the lure is a flat sided pike jerkbait in mahogany 6"

tightlines john

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Hi there, if I were starting out and never used a router before I wouldn't attempt doing a lure with a router. They can be very dangerous and routers run somewhere around 25,000 to 30,000 rpms. You don't want to get your fingers anywhere near a router bit. I would use a rasp or sandpaper to shape your lure. If you have ever used a dremel tool they can be alot of help. Good luck on your first lure and post a picture when you get it done. The more you work at this the better you will get. It just takes time and patience. Ken Schmitz

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I do not reccomend using a full size router on individual baits it's just too dangerous. I use a dremel tool and dremel router table with a 1/8" round over bit to round ove the edges.

Some say you can cut two baits out tail to tail leaving them attached and then rout them but my fingers are far to important for me to risk this on my baits.

Some people laminate balsa wood "sides" onto a hardwood center for their full round baits this gives you strength in the middle and workability on the sides. making it easier to round off the baits.

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good point, safety first

my mate who makes lures has had them names A&E lures on account of how many times he has had to visit accident and emergency ward, the lures do catch but i recon it cos there blood scented, anyway i don't want to go down that road

cheers for the help, yet again

tightlines john

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i don't have a belt sander, its on the list of tools needed (wanted) :D

when i look at that list i'm wondering if its making lures or buying tools that is attracting me to this????

my friend does it with a belt sander, maybe i should move it up the list???

this dremmel thing sounds good though, i could get upto all kinds of diy stuff with a dremmel :lol:

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Funny I just came in from the shop working onthe same process. I have a 6inch disc on my lathe that I use to get close to the shape, then I use a small rasp an try to get it closer, guess what then lol good ole elbow grease with the course paper. While I'm here the lure I'm building is bare wood but I'm going to put the hardware on it an see how it runs before I start on any more of the same type. Its made out of basswood a few days drying should get all the moisture out don't you think.

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Muskietom51

your lure will react differently bare wood vs finished and coated. I reccomend doing a simple paint job (white with a red head) on the first lure and finish it completly before testing it then you will know exactly how the action will be. If needed you can make adjustments on the next one. As you build keep detailed records of the details such as

lip angle

weight location(s)

amount of weight you added

how many coats of epoxy

hook attachment points

etc.

this will help you duplicate things on the next lure.

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I use a router table to round the edges on my baits and then I go to a flat file. The router is one "mean critter" though and I make sure I am concentrating 100% on what I am doing while operating the beast. For a long time tho I used nothing other than a flat file. I have a belt sander and do use it on occassion but find the easiest way to get a good "shape" to things is with a flat wood file...they work wonders, learn to use one.

Jed

www.bikinibaitcompany.com

"Only when the last plant has died, the last river poisoned, and the last fish caught will we realize we cannot eat money (19th Century Cree Saying)"

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I haven't used a shop type router since I was in the 6th or seventh grade in wood working class. Of all the tools we learned to use in that class, the router was the scariest one for me. I second what's already been said here. Other tools can do the job much more safely.

My newest batch of lures that I am working on are dual-sided rounded, cigar shaped bodies dual-sided tapered bodies (for prop baits) made from bass wood dowels.

The only tools I used were my sanding block with fairly coarse sandpaper, hobby knife and good old elbow grease. The results were actually pretty good so to sum it up, low tech will work with the only downside being more time spent working and shaping your lure but the consolation is that you'll have all of your fingers intact! :lol: Good Luck!

--IslandBass

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I use a router table all the time to do my baits (certain styles anyway). Jed's right caution is the order of the day. You can also outfit dremel style tools with router bits too. I picked up a small set of router bits for my dremel for $15 at Sears.

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out2llunge is right, dremel also has an attachment that you can make a flat bottom like a router. I use a router on my musky lures that are 7? long. It works nice but when the bit gets dull it starts to jump and chip the wood. So if you do use a router keep your bit sharp, and yes a sharp bit will cut fingers faster. So your better option is have your bonehead friend router your lures and tell him you will finish sand your and his lures in trade. :lol::lol:

-Corey

Drumel part numbers.

Dremel 565 Multi Purpose Cutting Kit 565D

And

Dremel 692D 6 Pc Router Bit Set

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A guy on another board told me to use PVC pipe, cut in half and lined with sand paper to round flat baits. Cut away the obvious excess then sand. 3/4 and 1/2 inch sizes should suffice for most baits. A bit crude, but it works for this hobbyist.

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I use a round sanding drum with my drill press for rough shaping and then a Dremmel for cleanup followed by hand sanding. I can do 90% of the shaping with the drill press/drum sander. The round shape of the drum makes forming rounded shapes easier. It is much faster than an Dremmel also.

I am working on building a jig to use a smaller router/laminate trimmer to shape my baits, bit the sanding has been too easy.

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I use a belt sander,then finish up with sand paper,and some elbow grease.I was speaking on the phone with one of the guys from here regarding a way to sand several lures at one time...He recommended trying a brass cleaner(a viberating tumbler system used to clean gun brass)I've got a catalog orderd that has these.I figure I can use a belt sander to get the rough shape,then throw them in the tumbler with a sanding agent to finish them up..Nathan

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Maybe I'm just old-fashioned (or just old as Coley stated in another post) but I prefer to use a custom-made knife to carve my lures. It has a small 1 1/2 blade that is only 1/4 wide at the widest part. I keep it razor sharp. I can carve a lure in about the same time with my knife that someone else can using a belt or drum sander. No dust! I can carve in the shop, outside, in the house while watching TV, etc. without having to wear a dust mask.

Gene

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I'LL have you know john that not one of my A&E visits are down to lure making.. 8O most other things in life have had me there though :? and the answer is NO!!! I wont use the router for you and send them up..lol.

Like the idea of plastic pipe lined with sandpaper though :wink: (that is if i dont cut my hand off cutting the pipe in half of course it seems.......

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For you knife people - I googled for knives and after sorting through knives. knife sets, tool sets, power carvers, etc, etc, etc....I found the following. Is this the type of knife you use? Or do you have other suggestions for knife sources? Routing on fishing lures is a little too risky for my old paws. Knives, files and sandpaper are more my style. Thanks - Pete

http://growinglifestyle.shop.com/cc.class/cc?pcd=5908327&ccsyn=13549

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I agree with Lincoya on the knife thing. Once you get the hang of it, nothing beats a nice thin bladed sharp knife 11/2 to 2 inches is just nice. In fact, you can fashion some nice carving knives from old hack-saw blades. Just add some elbow grease to hone it to a scary sharp edge.

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Fishbooger,

Although Rick Butz makes a good knife here is a link to a knife that is used by hundreds of woodcarvers and costs about half what a Rick Butz knife costs. And Smoky Mountain Woodcarvers is a good place to do business with.

http://www.woodcarvers.com/murphyknives.htm

Here is a picture of some of the knives that I use for lure carving. I also made these knives.

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Lincoya,

Those knives are Beautiful !! How do you fix the blade in the handle? I know that Mylures did a post I believe on this board about how to sharpen knife blades, but how do you keep yours sharp? Are the blades carbon?

Skeeter

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Skeeter,

Thanks for the kind words.

The blades are put into the handles with Devcon 5-minute epoxy. I like it because it sets so quick that I can start sharpening on the knife in 15-20 minutes. I use diamond sharpening sticks in four different grits to put an edge on the knives. After that I strop the blade with a very thin piece of leather glued to a small flat piece of hardwood with a closed grain such as poplar, maple, or cherry. On this leather I have a polishing compound called "Yellowstone" but any good compound will do as long as it is a very fine grit. This will give you an edge sharp enough to shave with if done properly and as long as you don't damage the edge all you have to do is strop the blade occasionally as you carve.

The middle blade is Damascus from a pocket knife. The other two blades are Soligen stainless steel morgue blades that were originally 12 inches long. I used my Dremel with a cutoff wheel to cut out a piece of steel to shape into a blade.

Gene

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