whitaker201

Extending pot life of slow cure epoxy?

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I am using BSI slow cure epoxy for installing bills in my crankbaits and would like to know if there is a way to slow the cure time so it has a longer pot life. Right now I can only get about 10 baits before I have to mix a new batch.  So far I tried heat and that does make the epoxy thinner but only for a short time then it sets up faster. Would denatured alcohol help extend the pot life? Is there a different epoxy with a longer pot life that is 100% waterproof?

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Being able to coat 10 baits with epoxy is pretty good. Real good in fact. Denatured alcohol will indeed extend your working time by a little. You'll just have to experiment to tell how much to use. I've thinned epoxy until it was thin enough to spray through an airbrush and it did indeed cure although it took much longer than normal, I wouldn't suggest thinning the epoxy and spraying it with an airbrush for several reasons. The obvious reason would be ruining an airbrush if the epoxy sets up inside. Another is that you can only get thin coats applying it really thin and I believe that when you use too much DA to thin the epoxy it gets brittle when it cures.  None of these are good.

The only other epoxy that will give you an extended application time is a decoupage epoxy like Etex. If your able to brush 10 baits with epoxy I would try thinning it with DA just a bit and call that good. 

Ben

 

Ben

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He is not coating baits. He is glueing bills.

I f mixing on a cup, once mixed, pour it onto a flat surface and spread it thin.

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  If you are top coating with an epoxy consider no glue or a non-epoxy glue in the lip slot.  Your first topcoat will completely encapsulate the lip/lure junction with epoxy and capillary action will draw a considerable amount into and around the lip. Your second topcoat layer will build a nice fillet around the lip/lure junction providing more strength.

  I have made several musky lures without any epoxy added to the lip slot, just a friction fit to the painted lure body, then topcoat.  So far no problems with 40+ inch Musky and the tie wire is through the lip.  The tie wire also provides another anchor and adds strength.  If the tie wire is attached to the body it should work equally well since the only resistance it needs to withstand the resistance of water and an occasional underwater obstruction.

A couple pro musky lure makers  use this method and some drill a hole for a small pin from the top of the head and through the lip for added holding power.  

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Cooling the epoxy will extend pot life. Spreading it out a little keeps it from heating up as much as it goes off.  Also having it something that will act as a heat sink will help as well. Mixing in the bottom of an upside down can of beer or soda works well. No corners and the aluminum acts as a heat sink.

Edited by clemmy
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Yes I am using the epoxy to install the bill not top coating baits.

Thank you. I will try the suggestions of keeping it cool and spreading it out thin. I have some scrap pieces of aluminum I can put the mixed epoxy on.

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The plastic tops for salsa and guacamole are great for mixing epoxy on, and you can flex them after you're done and the leftover is set to remove  the hardened epoxy, so you can reuse the top.

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I like Rod Bond regular speed paste epoxy for installing lips.  The pot/work time is about an hour.  It gets fairly hard in 6 hrs, full cure 12-18 hrs.  Makes for easy installation, waterproof, 

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17 hours ago, BobP said:

I like Rod Bond regular speed paste epoxy for installing lips.  The pot/work time is about an hour.  It gets fairly hard in 6 hrs, full cure 12-18 hrs.  Makes for easy installation, waterproof, 

Do you need to clean off the excess immediately, or can you clean it off after that first hour?

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I think the reason spreading it thin works is that it reduces the temp. The heat from curing epoxy dissipates more readily - slowing the curing process. It is the reverse of what honeybees do to survive the winter. They cluster in a sphere - reducing the surface area of the hive-  to preserve body heat.  

Placing epoxy in a shallow tray in an ice bath would incorporate both suggestions. Doing this instead of using DNA has the advantage of not thinning it. Plus once the temp reaches normal, it would set more quickly. 

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