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Can you get a smooth Epoxy coat without encompassing the entire lure?

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Greetings.

      Hello! A little background for this topic... I design and 3D print my own lures using ABS. Afterwards, I dissolve and smooth them (to some degree), wire, then airbrush and clear coat them with devcon expoxy 2 ton. I have made quite a few and got the process down pretty well. I make lures from 2" to 8" for various types of freshwater fish. 

 

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      However, the five 6 inch glide style lures that have two parts are a brand new design from me. (The lures without eyes) They are version #1.0.0. So one thing I didn't account for is the thickness epoxy adds which is a problem when it comes to the tail wiggle - a primary function of this lure. I will fix this in the next version. But for these five, my question is, can I apply an epoxy coat only in the areas that do not hinder the wiggle action? For instance, from the head to the back, but not where the three slots are or that part of the tail. If so, I could polyurethane those other areas as that poly is quite thin. But working with epoxy is tricky!!!

     I ask because I have lost two lures to a poor epoxy coat application. If it is too thin it'll create holes and blobs etc instead of a nice smooth coat as seen on the two 8 inch lures in the image. It seems like its required that you encompass the whole bait to get that smooth surface. I just thought I'd ask before I lose a lure. :D

     Thanks!

 

Edited by datguy.dev

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Wow , I have lost more than 2 lures to a bad coat ( my fault ) epoxy can be temper mental ( just about any top coat )

1. measure and mix properly

2. few drops of denatured alcohol to thin, mixed 

3. use a decent brush ( better brush helps me )

4. learning curve hurts sometimes, just learn from your mistakes.

D2T is pretty forgiving if you got everything lined up and ready to go, you might want to find some older/trash lures to practice on so the learning curve does not hurt so much.

be meticulous.

IMO.

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12 minutes ago, azsouth said:

Wow , I have lost more than 2 lures to a bad coat ( my fault ) epoxy can be temper mental ( just about any top coat )

1. measure and mix properly

2. few drops of denatured alcohol to thin, mixed 

3. use a decent brush ( better brush helps me )

4. learning curve hurts sometimes, just learn from your mistakes.

D2T is pretty forgiving if you got everything lined up and ready to go, you might want to find some older/trash lures to practice on so the learning curve does not hurt so much.

be meticulous.

IMO.

You missed the question. Let say ... have you ever tried to epoxy coat just half of the lure? In my experience, where the are edges, the epoxy won't create a proper bonding. That is what I'm asking about but these lures aren't one piece. So if I paint a thick epoxy coat from the head to the mid section, do you think it will dimple or make weird formations? 

Edited by datguy.dev

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My experience has been that you should do the entire lure. For sharp edges, you can just touch sand them enough to take the sharp edge off. 

Skeeter

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with any top coat if you start with it, finish it. why are you putting on so thick?

D2T does not have to go on thick. IMO.

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I don't have any direct experience with the baits you have created, but the only problem I think you will face is the paint not staying in that jointed area.  The other aspect I think clear coat does is sealing the lure for any potential leaky areas.  Not sure how your bait is built and if that would be a concern for you. I don't see why you couldn't do what you are asking, but as you indicated, a re-design would be better for an overall quality bait.

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You need to encompass the entire lure for protection and durability otherwise water will find a way to get in under the epoxy.

1. Only handle with Nitrile gloves to eliminate any possibility of surface contamination.

2. Use 30 min epoxy to allow more time to be able to use it and for it to flow out.

3.Use a brush and put on a thin coating.

4.Put on a lure turner until dry.

 

Instead of 30 min epoxy , a product I really like to use is Enviro Tex Lite from Michaels, AC Moore, or Amazon. (tip.50% Coupons can be used at craft stores)

Check out SolarBaits (a member here) video on how to apply.

 

 

Edited by fshng2

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You can't apply general practices to abnormal circumstances ... I appreciate the suggestions and info, but it doesn't really help with coating these unique baits. I'm working on these today so I guess I'll just have to try and sacrifice one, but probably two or three, of them to R&D.

 

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41 minutes ago, datguy.dev said:

You can't apply general practices to abnormal circumstances ... I appreciate the suggestions and info, but it doesn't really help with coating these unique baits. I'm working on these today so I guess I'll just have to try and sacrifice one, but probably two or three, of them to R&D.

 

Yea keeping epoxy or polyurethane out of the slots and other areas of concern is going to be a challenge as the resin flows until it cures.

Have you thought about using a thin coat of UV curable resin in those areas?

Once the UV resin is applied it can be cured in 10-15 seconds.

https://www.solarez.com/product-category/fishing/fly-tying/

Check out solarez fly tie formulas (thin, medium or hard)

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When I used to coat my jointed PVC swimbaits with epoxy, I would coat the inside faces of the joints with D2T, using a brush, and lapping the epoxy out onto the lure section's face 1/4".  I brushed it on thinly, and rounded the edges of my bait sections so the epoxy wouldn't pull away from them.

Then I'd hang them over my workbench so I could keep an eye on them as they cured, and remove any drips that might accumulate.  I used paper clip wires passed through the screw eyes of my hinge to hold the pieces more or less level as the epoxy cured.

Finally I would assemble the lures, put them on my ferris wheel style turner, and coat the faces with E tex, passing it onto the 1/4" strip of D2T to insure a good bond.  I would leave them to turn overnight, and then put on a second coat of Etex the next morning, which I let turn all day.

I never had a problem with the D2T in the joints, or the Etex that was lapped over it on the faces.

Here's a picture of some of those baits:

 

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15 hours ago, fshng2 said:

Nice carving and paint on those swimbaits Mark!

Thanks.  I used a dremel with a sanding drum.

I just looked at the date of that post.  It was 10 years ago!  How time flies.

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Well, things turned out alright with just epoxy.... It turns out, my best assumption, is I had a problem with my application of the epoxy. Moreover, the brushing of it? I found that if I brush an area of the bait more, despite the amount, but with an adequate amount, it doesn't want to pit/dimple as much as I have experienced in the past. I liked to go thick because it was a safety net. But apparently it wasn't as much. I'm still learning.... 

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Edited by datguy.dev
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It’s all about completely wetting out the epoxy on the surface. I formulate adhesives, including epoxies, for a living and this is one of the main things that creates a poor coating surface. The epoxies made for clear coats have good surface tension and will not fish eye aka dimple on their own. If you’re seeing dents or bare spots it’s just because you didn’t spread the epoxy to that spot and allowed it to wet out the whole surface. On occasion it can be something on the surface, such as an oil, that is messing with surface tension and it’s easy enough to use alcohol to do a light wipe down prior to clear coating if you think you have debri on the lure surface.

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