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IslandBass

How Do You Correct Lures That List?

5 posts in this topic

I would like to know, "How does one go about making adjustments or corrections to get the lure to sit in the water correctly?

This is first problem I have encountered on my first try with a non-minnow style crankbait. My lure does not stay upright in the water unassisted. When released, the lure falls and lies completely on one side in the water. This occurs with or without the lead weight installed.

I am not certain what the true causes are but my best guesses are:

1) The outer edge of the lure might not be perfectly square or symmetric.

2) The general curvy shape of the lure. Maybe my chosen shape isn't the best choice.

My thoughts to approaching this problem are to:

1) Reinstall the lead weight (to establish the lure?s center of gravity)

2) Sand down the ?heavy? side and ?square? the outer edge until the lure sits upright by itself.

I realize that this might be too much to ask as such knowledge might be a well-guarded secret. Previous posts in the forum dance around this issue. Any input, advice or guidance about whether I am going about this the right or wrong way or to steer my in the right direction is greatly appreciated.

The attached file contains a picture of the template I am using and also has other details. Thanks!

--IslandBass

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

ib_balsa_lure_specs3.doc

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Let me have a try here, I'm no expert but I've tried my hand in designing lures. :)

From the shape of your lure; yes it would lie flat on it's side because the shape has a lot of material on the lower half. More wood = more bouyancy so the front & end wouldn't want to stay down :)

I'm making some assumption here and please excuse me for redoing your lure profile (see attached pic). The gray area is where I'd suggest the lead weight to be & quite a lot cause the natural tendency of the shape in your design would like to go belly up. Try it - just a little bit of weight on top would make it float vertical (bellyup though). And I would suggest making the tail much slimmer as well; sort of tapering from the head towards the tail, that would cut the bouyancy in the tail part & the weight/balancing will have balance it to float something like what I have drawn. It doesn't have to be round, it can be flat-sided as well, just taper it.

Oh, one more thing, keep the weight as low as possible. This way you're lowering the centre of gravity, so the weights are at it's most efficient in pulling/weighting the lure to sit right.

Good luck with your design.

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I agree, your weight is going vertical into the lure as pictured on your diagram. Your weight needs to run in more of a horizontal fashion in, or as close to the belly of the lure as possible. This makes things a little more difficult than just drilling a hole in the belly of a bait with a drill bit. But, I think you will find this will cure your problems. If you are building the bait from a 2 piece design it will be rather easy to get the cavity that you need. If your are building from a 1 piece(solid)block of wood it may be more difficult. I dont build from a 1 piece design. Perhaps someone else on the site may help you. With a two piece design just chisel/cut/your cavity before glueing the 2 halves and wire together. I pour my lead after the halves are glued. You could also glue in a precast piece of lead if you prefer to do this rather than risking the burn effect on softer woods like balsa.

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Yep, what they said, more weight lower. You can also use lead worm weights or split-shot and form them to your needs in a vice. Also, with the worm weights you already have a centered starting hole for a hook hanger.

Dean

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LaPala, TBait, and Dean McClain,

Thanks for all of your valueable input. All of your suggestions

1) place weight lower and more horizontal

2) taper the rear or tail end

make sense and I will apply them. I have worm and egg weights on hand but I was wondering though if coiled lead is a feasible option. I bought it to use when I give drift fishing for steelhead a go for the first time this coming winter.

Also, I cut out enough blanks to try both a one piece and and two piece approach. I'll try both.

LaPala,

Your suggested graphic is awesome! You might say you're not an expert but you and the others are in my book! B) I will give that a shape you recommended a try as soon as I can.

Thanks again to all!

--IslandBass

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