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Basseducer

Farewell to the lead arts

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Hello fellow Leadheads, It is with a sad heart that I quitting all production of lead baits. My doctor finally said that I have reached my saturation point and would be in my beat interest to quit. I will be liquidating the wire bait portion of my business. I will start posting equipment and component list in the classifieds soon. I am OK health wise. I don't glow in the dark or have uncontrollable twitches. It's just time to move on. I will continue following the soft plastics forum as I will still be producing plastic baits.

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Ramiro,

    Well I'm sad to hear. You have been on hear a long time and have contributed help to many here. You have helped me many times in the past as well. I hope all is well. Good luck in your future endeavors. Stop by and say hi to us here.  

Ted (Cadman)

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Basseducer It is wise to heed your Dr's advise.

It is hard to close the door on something creative that has given years of pleasure if there is still juice or  a desire to do so. 

It is how ever fortunate that our craft of tackle making allows for so many other creative and challenging areas for creativity.

It is also a huge reminder for all of us to practice our craft as safely as possible.

That being said  best of health and  good luck with opening new doors for your creativity energy. 

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Thanks smalljaw and canuk 2, it is hard to walk away from something that I have toiled over and perfected over just long of 40 years. Back in the day is was what precautions. Now I can't emphasize enough the need for them. I'm lucky, I got out in time. 

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That’s an idea, for sure. That said, Basseducer you are the only person I have heard of that has had issues since I’ve been here. You have much more experience than I and prolly most here after pouring and using lead for 40+ years. Can you share with us and give us guidance on lead usage based on what you know now? What you may have learned? I think most guys and gals, me included, only know what we have read here in that the perils of lead usage and ingestion are hand to mouth but In my mind, I have always questioned that.

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I thought about lead free, but my market would not tolerate the expense or the weight difference. Everyone wants smaller/heavier.

I found that you could lay an ingot of lead on your hand for 20 years and not get contaminated. It's when you work it by hand and rub it till your fingers are black that you can absorb it into your system. When you transfer this black residue to cups and eating utensils or touch  your mouth you can add to your contamination. The melting methods we as hobby pourers or even small business operators don't get the lead hot enough to be a problem. Lead does not vaporize at those temps. It's when we use dirty lead that smokes or when we flux that residue becomes airborne. Not to mention what's in the smoke from other contaminants.

It is always a good idea to wash your hands anytime you come in from the shop or just take a break. If you notice that black residue on your hands wash them first in cold water as hot water tends to open your pores and let some lead into your system.

Wear your protective stuff because it is always better to er on the side if caution.

You can find some really good info on those bullet casting sites.

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Fortunately my custom caster has not had any problems so far and he gets checked regularly. I'm amazed that it is so,  since he smokes constantly when working. Being from an area with LOTS of natural lead mines, I think lead gets a bad rap in a lot of cases. 

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That is too bad , in the early 70s I helped my father deliver gasoline to service stations and farms all over east Texas. I washed my hands in leaded gas all the time. I washed my tools and equipment with leaded gas, I even sat on top of his gas tanker with fumes all around me. I have never had a problem with my health, I guess it can happen, or maybe I am just blessed. I hope every thing works out like you want it too. The people have always helped me when I need help on this forum that is the great thing about Tackle underground , it is the people.  

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Sorry to hear that you have given up on lead-based tackle.

I'm guessing there's something in the methods you use your hygiene practices, or somewhere in there that is causing you to have high lead levels.

I once worked in a lead/zinc mine and was covered head-to-toe in the stuff.

Had my blood drawn every 3 months to check for lead.

While my lead levels did go up I never got to a point where I was taken out of the mine.

After a year-and-a-half I took a transfer to a job with a better schedule, better pay and less responsibility.

Since then my blood levels have dropped significantly and I'm currently sitting at 1 mg/dl as of last month even though I cast hundreds of pounds of it every year. And yes my hands have been black from lead many many many times while cleaning up lead jigs, sinkers, down rigger weights etc.

Proper hand-washing and good hygiene practices have kept me safe.

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wow, just saw this topic. So sorry to hear that you got sick from this stuff. Thank you for the list of precautions. I do a little lead pouring and use wheel weights. I do this during nice weather when I can do it outside and upwind of any breezes. But I never paid attn to the residue from handling the lead. I will from now on. Good luck and stay well

 

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If you pour a great deal of lead baits-

1- An adequate exhaust booth is mandatory when pouring indoors

2- Know  THE TEMPERATURE OF THE LEAD IS WHEN POURING- some  types of small pouring/ladle  pots will heat the lead over 900 degrees. Spend the $ on a pyrometer

3- Have your lead levels checked annually- never assume your levels are normal!!

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