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So working on a new design for Lakers and pike its turning out really good action wise. Right now it’s just a wooden prototype but will be moulded and future baits will be poured.

I am thinking about adding a rattle when I start pouring them. My thought is to throw some BB’s in a plastic or metal tube and plug either end. Then suspend it in the mould 

First time adding a rattle and can’t decide if a metal or plastic tube is better? Louder or better attractant 

I can’t be the first to think of this 

 

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1 hour ago, bladesandbaits said:

.Empty .22 short cartridge with 3-#9 TSS Tungston shot.

Pull the end cap out a  #9 TSS shot shell to get the shot.

Regards,

Blades

 

I like it I get to do some shooting and solve my problem Win Win

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17 hours ago, bladesandbaits said:

.Empty .22 short cartridge with 3-#9 TSS Tungston shot.

Pull the end cap out a  #9 TSS shot shell to get the shot.

Regards,

Blades

 

Be sure the rounds have already been shot.  Otherwise, you can get a really loud, onetime rattle.  Hahaha

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On 5/19/2019 at 1:05 PM, mark poulson said:

Be sure the rounds have already been shot.  Otherwise, you can get a really loud, onetime rattle.  Hahaha

Not to mention trashing a good bait!:cry:

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For plastics, I use glass beads in a plastic or metal tube. If you don't want to make a rattle, they do sell them on DIY online tackle shops.

Edited by datguy.dev
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I like to make rattles that produce a lower frequency sound. There is plenty of scientific study available that suggest fish cannot hear the the higher frequency sounds transmitted by a rattle with BB's.

https://www.geoexpro.com/articles/2011/03/marine-seismic-sources-part-viii-fish-hear-a-great-deal

https://biasproject.wordpress.com/news-from-the-ocean/fish-and-sound/

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Spent .22 works great. I also use worm rattles occasionally. You can also drill a hole straight through and cap both ends with a countersunk piece of metal or plastic. Add some BBs. Circuit board sounds cool too. Play around with shot size, material, etc. 

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20 hours ago, goolies said:

I like to make rattles that produce a lower frequency sound. There is plenty of scientific study available that suggest fish cannot hear the the higher frequency sounds transmitted by a rattle with BB's.

https://www.geoexpro.com/articles/2011/03/marine-seismic-sources-part-viii-fish-hear-a-great-deal

https://biasproject.wordpress.com/news-from-the-ocean/fish-and-sound/

Since bass hunt a lot by detecting vibrations with their lateral line, maybe the higher frequency rattles are felt more than heard, and that's why they still work.

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I made some rattles using brass tubing they sell in short lengths at Ace Hardware and other hardware stores.  It is very thin wall and helps reduce the added weight of the rattle and still have the metal chamber.  I learned it here or on another lure tutorial site.

Cut the tubing with a hack saw the length you want the rattle chamber but do not cut all the way through.  Now cut the tubing off about one tubing diameter past your first two cuts.  Now you have one length of tubing with two cuts that are not quite all the way through.  Cut the two end pieces length wise so that you can bend the tubing open and flatten the two end pieces with a hammer or pliers.  Fold the flattened end piece over the end of your rattle chamber, put your rattles in, bend the other flattened end and you have your rattle chamber.

Hope that makes sense.

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On 6/5/2019 at 9:08 AM, barrybait said:

I made some rattles using brass tubing they sell in short lengths at Ace Hardware and other hardware stores.  It is very thin wall and helps reduce the added weight of the rattle and still have the metal chamber.  I learned it here or on another lure tutorial site.

Cut the tubing with a hack saw the length you want the rattle chamber but do not cut all the way through.  Now cut the tubing off about one tubing diameter past your first two cuts.  Now you have one length of tubing with two cuts that are not quite all the way through.  Cut the two end pieces length wise so that you can bend the tubing open and flatten the two end pieces with a hammer or pliers.  Fold the flattened end piece over the end of your rattle chamber, put your rattles in, bend the other flattened end and you have your rattle chamber.

 

I do the same thing with discarded aluminum arrow shafts.  The aluminum they use in making arrows is fairly hard and when used with a steel rattle makes a pretty loud rattle. The only thing is that you will have to heat it when bending over the end flap or it will break and overheating it will melt it. It's sort of a fine line with the heat, but once you get the hang of how much heat to use it goes well. 

 

Ben

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Many years ago I posted a rattle made from a brass tube. I think the pictures are lost so I am not posting a link.

Instead of cutting a flat and soldering a closed tube, I cut a thin spigot and bent it over. This retained the ball and made a 'ping' sound as the thin spigot vibrated like a tuning fork.

There is documentation out there that is conflicting about rattles. Some think that it scares the fish, others that it raises interest. I would be more interested in pursuing sound effects of movement than paint jobs, but primarily, I will stick to movement.

Remember, the fish's primary sensory organ is the lateral line, a long series of pressure sensors that convey information about small pressure variations. The fish senses movement, and with two lateral lines, it can also sense direction.

Fish also have a strong sense of taste through their 'nose'. If you ever hook a fish behind its nose it goes absolutely bonkers, this is because there are a lot of nerves in that area and it feels pain!

Water is not the best medium for sight sensing, but no doubt sight plays a part, especially close up. But for me, attracting a fish from 6yds will always be better than 6". Although having said that, the last 6" could be considered the most critical. But my belief is that after attracting from 6yds that the fish is committed.

Understanding your quarry is part of lure engineering :)

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman
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10 minutes ago, Hillbilly voodoo said:

Agree knowing the species you’re building for is huge

It’s Lake trout that seem to like rattles and the plan is to compare without and with a rattle on a few designs 

Exactly the right way to go about it; comparison tests. I am already lining up a team of fishermen in USA to test my new lure, if it passes initial tests. I have family who fish out there in SC who know nothing about lure design - perfect :)

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman
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