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TwoBits

Help with compressor

24 posts in this topic

TwoBits,

What you should compare is the volume (Cubic Feet per Minute) of air the compressor can deliver verses what the requirements of your airbrush are.

The description that is given in the add is quite vague. I would get more details before making a decision about this compressor. A standard bicycle pump can deliver 70 - 100 psi but I wouldn't try one on an airbrush.

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I don't have an air brush yet, I've been looking around at compressors first. I'd probably buy a Paasche VL.

What other uses do compressors have other than operating air hammers and such? I see them at Lowes packaged with a pneumatic hammer, but thats not a big deal for me. I would spend more money if a larger compressor could do more around the house than just operate an air brush.

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TwoBits

Things for your compressor to do:

dusting, inflating tires, toys etc. Vacuum clamping, pneumatic nailing & stapling, spraying paint, sanding, drilling, impact wrenches and air ratchets die grinders, etc.

A compressor is a tool that you may use every day or very seldom.

Just about any tool that is available in electric power is available in pneumatics.

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If money is an issue.. that compressor is a decent deal for $40.00 ( I dont think you can find a more inexpensive unit that can do a decent job) and it will service an airbrush just fine! I think it will be ok as a starter... but down the road I can see you thinking of moving up in size. Its not good for much more than an airbrush and blowing things up.., it just wont have the umph behind it. I have said before that my $79.00 air compressor from Home Depot does just fine and works well. Its a little bit larger than that, so again it does me just fine. Cody

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P.S. Pneumatic tools dont bother me... so having a larger compressor was out. AS well as the size of them. You can get a Dremmel tool for the compressor as well, they work just fine. As mentioned its a tool that a lot of tools can be used with... and it can get costly! Cody

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I would pass on that one.

It is a diaphram model with a small tank.

Good for putting air in tires.

They do not last that long, been their done that.

With that small tank it will be turning on and off all the time and your air flow will vary all over the place.

Motor running is very loud and the power draw is high.

I would wait and save a little longer, and get a piston model with a larger

tank.

Just make shure it has a regulated flow, not just a pressure switch that turns the tank on and off at set values.

You can get them at Habor feight for under $100.

My 5hp 20 gal. model is 16 years old and I run it all the time.

Air tools for every thing.

Last spring I had to get the motor rewound and they supped it up to more like 7 hp, cost $68 to have redone.

Only other thing to do is change the oil, I now run it on synthedic.

It will most likly out last me.

I have five dead diaphram models in the attic waiting till I can figure out how to repair them.

Then E-bay maybe.

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Hi there, I think that Craftsman compressor with the cast iron sleeve and oil lube would work good. I bought one of those small piston type compressors oil-less and it failed already. It had an aluminum bore and the piston scratched the bore and its shot already. I contacted a repair shop and it would cost almost as much to fix as I paid for it. He recommended not using a oil-less compressor if your going to use it alot. I may go look at that Craftsman today. Good luck. Ken Schmitz

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This is the beast I bought at the recommendation of Chip and it has worked fine. I bought it at HD for about 125 dollars.....I think. Once the tank has filled (about 3 minutes) I can spray continually for about 10 minutes before it kicks on at which point I am startled to the point of having an H-attack! I put a cardboard box over the top of the thing to quiet it down a bit (tried the same thing with my ex-wife but she kept taking the box off) but it still scares ya half to death (so did my ex). I have no idea if it's a piston type of pump or what but I do know if you push that little black button on the top it comes on.

Hey Rich, if your compressor outlives you can I have it?

Jed :D

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Jed,

Sure can but the shipping is going to be killer.

Weights like 200Lbs.LOL

Get a longer hose and move it as far away as you can.

Makes it lots quieter, nicer to work.

With that motor cover it is hard to tell.

If you need to check the oil , then it is a piston pump.

Is that one giving you the steady flow of air that you need?

If not you can put a tank in line and add volume.

You can make a tank out of 4" or larger PVC pipe.

2 end caps a drill bit and a tap, and glue and your almost done.

Regulater on the out end will cost than the pipe.

10' long and weights about 4lbs, just make shure you get all the little drill shavings out before running it.

It will kick much les often.

Or crank the radio up so you do not hear it....................

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Two Bits, the Craftsman will service you well for airbrushing and is a good deal.. BUT that particular model is ( or should be) $99.00 or somewhere real close around there. I visited Home Depot and bought an almost identical unit in fetures; style and size and its made by Husky for $79.00. I was kind of torn between the two units and eventually, the $20.00 savings became important to me. That was $20.00 more I could use for Fishing Tackle! :D Remeber though the Craftsman return policy. Thats another big reason to at least consider Sears. You can return it anytime if it fails on you! I have a 4 brush manifold system that can have four airbrushes running at the same time hooked up to my Husky. It works awesome and I have had no problems with it. Either of the 3 mentioned here will do good for Airbrushing. After I bought my Husky last year, Chip did a great post on his Husky that is pictured above, that is a little bit larger in Size and storage space and some not so powerful tools can be operated off of it. I almost took it back and moved up in size, but I am quite comfortable with my compressor, its a nice size and I can move it easier with out killing myself! Remember that MOST of the Airbrush companies sell their own airbrush compressors and for the most part a lot of them are the Diaphram version AND they are very costly. They are also set on a specific PSI that can rarely be adjusted unless you modify it. You can get a better rated compressor at Sears, The Depot or Lowes for less money than an Airbrush Company Brand, and they are decent quality products. But I use mine from the Depot, and I reccommend it, and for $79.00, it was well worth it! Just my Honest opinion though! Cody

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I wouldn't use pvc pipe for an air tank. Most compressors deliver upwards of 125 psi pvc isn't meant to handle this kind of pressure. While this may work I wouldn't want any one to get hurt.

Harbor freight has a 7 gallon portable air tank with a regulator for less than $20. I would just install one of these inline to add tank volume.

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Cheese head,

3" Pvc shc 40 is rated to 260 psi.

PSI is the same in water or air.

4" is near that also, do not have a hunk to read it off on hand.

So I can give you fact not opinion.

There are different grades of PVC out there.

You must buy the pressure rated not the vent line.

I have my entire building 3 stories, garage, and yard piped for air.

All is PVC with brass fittings and over 10 years old, not a falure yet.

No rust in my lines to screw things up.

I have pressure tested it up to 200 psi.

I also have been present when industial chiller lines I was having installed at the Harley Davidson corp. office were pressure tested to 600 psi.

This was Sch. 80.

So the myth that plastic will not work is just that.

Better at 1/4 of the cost.

I can put together a 4 fitting manifold with all brass quick connects for under $10.00.

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Richoc,

I stand corrected. After reading your post about the tank I immediatly thought of foam cored vent line.

I agree that using the proper pvc is probably better than steel as is will not rust out causing a weak spot. Thanks for the idea. I am going to explore putting a pipe tank above the rafters in my garage.

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Now your thinking.

That is exactly what I was think of telling Jed to do.

End cap adapters will cost the most.

Get your threaded end quick connect fittings at Harborfreight.

5 packs all brass under $5, sale $2.99 at times.

Please use CLEANER, then PRIMER, and the HEAVY DUTY glue.

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Can you guys elaborate a little on how you are building this extra "tank" and also the deal where you can hook up four airbrushes? I am still getting my shop set up the way I want it and by the way this sounds, this method could help me alot if I build it this way in the beginning. Thanks again.

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Hey Five Big Fish, I bought a Brass 4 way Quick Connect Air Manifold System from Home Depot or E-Bay ( I cant remember which ) . Curently E-Bay is selling the 2 way and 3 way connectors pretty cheap, ( for under $5.00! ) So it isnt that much money by the way, like mentioned. Basicly that connects to the Compressor via a hose or the Valve itself. I have mine hooked up by a hose, cause I needed a coupler, and I had the hose that fit both, the compressor AND the manifold air intake. There are four quick connects that are on that. These are the same quick connects that the power tools use. I bought four Quick Connect hoses from Bear Air, www.bearair.com They are called Terry Hill Hot Hoses. They are the Bomb! :D A little expensive but well worth it. The Terry Hill Quick Connect hoses needed a coupler to fit into the manifold system ( I bought it at Home Depot for sure ) AND I have a quick connect system on each brush! I basicly have quick connects everywhere! :D I can take the brush off the hose for easy cleaning, I can take the hose off at the manifold etc. The set up mentioned and the Terry Hill Hot Hoses are the best darn System for running more than one airbrush at the same time and or using it for more than one color fast and easy. I definitely reccommend having the 4 way manifold system as well. I think all told it cost me around $20.00 for the complete manifold and couplers ( since I needed step down couplers) and around $20.00 each for the Terry Hill Hot Hoses. You also need to specify which Brush you have so you can get the Quick Connect to fit your air brush! It makes it REAL EASY!! Plus you get to run with more than one brush at a time! Cody

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Ok, got a camera in my hands.

This a 800 micron air filter, made form pvc.

They just drilled and tapped in a fitting.

A 10' section will make a good aux. tank.

You can just buy the fits to do this also.

This is my manifold set up.

You can make it have as many connectors as you wish.

I have conections all over the lines.

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Here is regulator/water separator.

Had a guy bust the filter once ( dropped it).

Other than that it has been in use since 1985.

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Wow, I have been going thru some compressor blues myself lately. You see some pvc jobs go thru on ebay from time to time, but if I were to do it myself then I would use a propane tank (the ones on gas grills) instead...or just a regular air tank like they have at walmart in the automotive section for under $20.00. I just aquired a new compressor myself and spent a month researching before making my purchase. I have few pnuematic tools but wanted to be able to use it for more than just airbrushing. I went with a Porter-Cable 2 HP 6 gallon pancake compressor, its max psi is 150 and will move 2.6 CFM @ 90 PSI which would push oatmeal thru my Iwata Micron if I wanted it to. When it comes to Compressors it seems like Craftsman is the loudest...locating mine outside was not an option for me so I built a "sound cabinet" to dampen the noise. My sound cabinet is the the left side of a closet which I built a double walled box to hold the pancake compressor, I used eggcrate and newspaper shreds inside 2 inch foam board walls to deaded the sound, sealed it with screws and silicone, I used none hardening caulk for the lid so I can get to the compressor to drain the moisture, remove it for work somewhere else, etc. Remember to vent the enclosure so it can draw air of course but keep the vents as small as possible. Couple of tips that made a huge difference for me:

Use screws and not nails, plywood creates a drum effect that works against you and sound-deadening spray-on coatings are availible at any auto parts store. Hope it helps, JIM

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The problem with using the metal tanks shows up in time.

Rust.

The inside on the tanks are nto coated in most cases.

The water collected during the compression/ expandsion processes makes it..

It will wreak havoc with you air tools, and air brush.

I used to use air at my work(in the new plant) to dust off, and cool off on hot days.

Was working in the old plant and blasted my self with rust flakes, they penatrated the skin.

PVC costs a 10th to use as metal pipe/tanks.

It doesn't rust.

You can cut in to it any time and ad on any thing you need.

1/2" sch40 is what I use to pipe it all through the property, 400 psi.

You can pipe your entire garage with fitting every 5 feet, for like $30.

Not counting the price of the brass conectors.

Mine has been flawless in service since 1999.

I add to it all the time, need a spot /add it in.

I have my 5 hp 20 gal. compressor in the 3rd story attic.

I only get water in the collector in the cooler wet months.

To make the volume tank will cost less than a new propane bottle and will be about 3 times the volume.

There are also large sizes of pipe, but not readly sold to the public.

That can mkae a renice tank.

At 10 feet long you can lift it with just one hand, weights about 8lbs.

Also I will only use brass fittings.

The pancakes(i have one to travel with) are great for running like one roofing nail gun at a time.

Strugles with keeping up with the framers.

Air tools for the car will have a very hard time.

You need volume for that.

I can not swing a hammer now since 94.

And I still do contracting when my body allows it.

All tools that can be are run by air.

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