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Any idea how to make this? Creme Lures at Walmart

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Creme has a proprietary process they use to make those from what I am told. I spoke to a gentleman that used to make worms for creme years ago and they would get them in a base colour and then create that colour after the fact. The would not divulge how it was done though. 

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In general, dyes won't penetrate cured plastisol.  I can think of several ways that might work, but, never finding that worm or pattern all that effective I have not tried it.

Perhaps starting out with the mold, then pouring the base color.  Then airbrushing a gradient onto the inside of the mold, placing the worm back in, then heating the mold to about 300 degrees to just soften and reset the plastic.  Not an efficient method, but, it might work.

I know this is not how it is done, but perhaps molding the base, then airbrushing the bait.  Then dipping in clear.  It would take out some of the surface detail, but it would work.

I bet other methods can be thought of as well.

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On 10/17/2019 at 4:02 PM, keakar said:

its done with a sprayed on dye i would imagine

That would work initially but dye doesnt sit still. Over time the dye would migrate and the worm would become one color. My guess would be some sort of core shot that can only be done with on a mold with a sliding gate.

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2 hours ago, McLuvin175 said:

That would work initially but dye doesnt sit still. Over time the dye would migrate and the worm would become one color. My guess would be some sort of core shot that can only be done with on a mold with a sliding gate.

Info I got is "That is a special process Creme does. We made the bone colour worms and shipped them then they dye them somehow with a non bleed pigment. Would never tell me how"

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Thanks for all the replies so far.  What a well kept secret they have.  I think it looks awesome and I can imagine all the different colors you could make with this fading color.  AWESOME!  The fading colors are perfect and consistent too!  Good job Creme. 

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Short answer, that's actually two colors. It's called a core shot. The base color, the creme is shot first at a hot temp, then the red is shot immediately after and ran at a lower temperature and pressure to allow for the "fade". Similar to the zoom core shot of red/black on thier trick worms.

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17 hours ago, Matt crawford said:

Short answer, that's actually two colors. It's called a core shot. The base color, the creme is shot first at a hot temp, then the red is shot immediately after and ran at a lower temperature and pressure to allow for the "fade". Similar to the zoom core shot of red/black on thier trick worms.

While we all do appreciate your experience on the production side, the quote I posted above came from the gentleman that actually produced these worms for Creme for years. 

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Ill

 

'll give this a shot. Try a twin injector with one color per side and the plunger bridge off. With the blending block in place start injecting the first color then start the second color while stopping the first color and finish out the push. Just MHO.

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It's dyed after the fact guys. According to one of their manufacturers Creme would get the worms injected in a bone colour and create the colour after they received them. If they were injected the final colour the head wouldn't be a solid colour, you would see the tail colour through the centre of it. 

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Alright, here's some questions I have in my head while I'm reading this...

1.  If it was a "core shot", then wouldn't you see the bone/ yellowish color in the core/middle of the bait?  Bass-boys posted a picture of a cut up Creme worm (thanks for the picture by the way @Bass-Boys) and the core is not a different color.

2.  If it was "dyed" after the fact,  wouldn't the dye spread throughout the worm, eventually turning it all red?  Say it's a non bleed dye, wouldn't the core be that bone/yellowish color?  How do you explain the consistent fade?  I've only seen airbrushing do that kind of fade and I doubt that's how they did it. 

I like what @Basseducer said but the measurements and how much you inject would have to be PRECISE.  It's not impossible though.  I might have to give it a try and experiment. 

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3 hours ago, Bass-Boys said:

the pictures are of Creme 

Oh. I thought it was yours. No wonder it looked just like a Creme. Personal preference but I like a good core shot better.

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On 11/4/2019 at 1:51 PM, DaveMc1 said:

It's dyed after the fact guys. According to one of their manufacturers Creme would get the worms injected in a bone colour and create the colour after they received them. If they were injected the final colour the head wouldn't be a solid colour, you would see the tail colour through the centre of it. 

Placing the worm head on a white chip for a day or two should reveal bleed from the dye used. I imagine the bleed is so slow most people dont notice it. Hang on to a worm for a year or two and if it turns all one color then theres more proof. From a production stand point it would seem you have to have these made up well in advance to achieve the right look before sending them to market. Sounds like a hassle to me.

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On 11/6/2019 at 6:24 AM, McLuvin175 said:

Placing the worm head on a white chip for a day or two should reveal bleed from the dye used. I imagine the bleed is so slow most people dont notice it. Hang on to a worm for a year or two and if it turns all one color then theres more proof. From a production stand point it would seem you have to have these made up well in advance to achieve the right look before sending them to market. Sounds like a hassle to me.

I manage a fishing department for a sporting goods store and we have some packages on the wall.  In my area, they sell slow, very slow, and I know I have packages well over a year old.  There is no evidence of color migration when comparing the new packages to the old.

After seeing the creme cut up, it must be a process similar to what Basseducer suggested.  Once the production machines are set up, the results would be repeatable and completely predictable.  

All dyes bleed some, some more then others, so the dye used in making the worm would stain a white chip.  This test would only show that a dye is used to color the worm, and we already know that.

 

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