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northbassman

SORRY, One last question.

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Sorry for all the questions but I have one more I forgot to ask. I heard alot of good things about the calhoun plastics, mainly on dels web site. IS this safe to melt and poor lets say in my basement without adding a ventilation hood or some other sort of ventalation mechanism? I want to do these plastics in my basement over the winter? AGAIN I thank all of you guys a ton.

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After pouring in my shed (in South GA) and not enough ventilation, I brought home a hepa filter mask. Filters out all the junk plus I put in a nice fan to circulate the air.

Plastic is nasty to breathe in and if you have any attractant cooked in, its even worse. Gives you a headache quick!!!

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Since it probably won't be recommended for me to do in the basement, how do you guys in the NOrth do it. I live here in Michigan and now it is cold so this is the time of the year I would like to make some baits for spring. I have a nice garage to work in but it is not heated so it is cold in there. But from what I have read that won't work because the glass I guess will break. So if anyone has any suggestions I would love to hear them. Thanks guys. Thanks a lot del for your replies.

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Northbassman, it gets plenty cold here in Nebraska too! I pour in my garage, using a kerosene heater to stay warm, and a 2 burner propane campstove to heat the plastic in aluminum cups. I do store my molds and plastics in the house until I'm ready to pour. I don't know what freezing temps would do molds or plastic.

Hope this helps, Good Luck !

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Thanks Pit bass, that is exactly what I was looking for. So in the winter you use the two burner cook stove instead of a microwave and aluminum cups instead of glass cups. Is there a certain kind of aluminum cup to use though or what exactly do you use. I was wondering could you use like an old soup can and bend it to get a spout???? But again exactly the post I was looking for from someone in my predicament. Again thanks for the info, very much appreciated.

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Northbassman, I use 4 oz aluminum pans from lurecraft. I actually started out using cut-down aluminum pop cans and a pair of bent pliers to grab the can for pouring. Seemed to work ok, but the lurecraft pans have a handle and are eaiser to use. I also have a larger 1 qt aluminum pan from MF for larger pours, but it's a little harder to pour with. I don't know how a soup can would work, but I tried a stainless steel soup-ladle that didn't work to well. It always scorched the plastic.

The only other problem I had was adjusting the stove to heat the plastic evenly and not scorch it. I use a small grill rack spaced-up above the burner and a piece of plate-metal between the burner and grill to disipate the heat. I had to play around with the flame setting and grill height to get the best results, but it's really not too hard. Good luck, pouring is a blast !

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I leave my plastic, coloring, and molds out in the shed all winter, no heat except from the burner when cooking. I haven't had any problems, I use the same cups as above from lurecraft. Just have to dress really warm when I go out. The good thing is the baits are ready to be pulled out of the first mold when your done pouring the last one. So it's a lot faster.

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I'll agree with Joe on that last point..Your baits cool faster and when your colder, you pour a little faster :lol: . Not that it gets cold in South Georgia but we have had the weather turn cooler.

Jim

Downside may be a little shaking on the pour from that cold north wind 8O!! I used to live in the Windy City...brrrrr!!!

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I just built a small vent cabinet with a bathroom fan. My hot plate sits in the cabinet as I work, it has an open front. The vent tube goes out through a nearby window. I made a board with a hole in it to fit the window.

The smoke from the plastic is nasty. So are fumes from a camp stove, or a kerosene heater.

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