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Big Epp

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I'd never heard of a "Huddleston" tail.  Learned something new! Thanks @mark poulson

Also, I tub tested it without the boot, and it still had no action (predictably), so I added a lexan lip to it, and now it swims great!

IMG_0507.jpg

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On 3/6/2020 at 4:11 PM, Big Epp said:

Check this out!  Somebody makes a boot-tailed hard-bait:

Hardbait Boot Tail.PNG

That's a KO blank of an old lure.  JDM company Fish Arrow teamed with Ken Huddleston back in the day and this was originally called the Fish Arrow Huddle Jack.

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Check out JW Lures Backlip 

It's a single piece boot tail design but you can see the boot comes off at an angle. Maybe some inspiration if you're still trying this concept out. 

 

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If you could get a lazy S motion like a jointed glider, but with the body roll of lure with a backlip boot tail, it could produce a very interesting action.

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Yeah, it's an interesting action for sure!  I started cutting up the old paint roller handle last night, so we'll see where this goes...

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The video works great! Your explanation is great throughout your whole design process and the action looks amazing! Cheers!

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man that's so cool! Now go catch a fish with it! The action alone should draw some eaters!

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25 minutes ago, seakarp said:

Looks pretty good Epp.

I just chanced upon someone else having a go at essentially the same thing .

Here it is:

Screen Shot 2020-09-02 at 7.28.06 AM.png

Not really close to the same thing because that Teckel Sprinker frog has hooks on top and it's basically weedless while the tail is like a whopper plopper tail and creates the same topwater action.

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The way that the tail is connected, if it where to be placed a bit under water, I think it would

have a good chance of wobbling to and fro, pivoting on that one connection point like a feathered treble, or not.

Just something to play with.

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So... I took it out to some real water today, and if I real with any speed, it spins around quite like I'd imagine the tail on that frog thing does.  I'll try it again with a deeper body and more strategically placed lead.

Design, Build, Test, and Improve!

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I looked into the whole theory of rotation mechanics of lips, but I stopped when I reached a full A4 page of text and still hadn’t got to the point. So, I am going to dispense with the engineering explanation and just make the suggestion. It all comes down to how much you are prepared to experiment.

I suggest making a prototype, a tail with a slot to soft-glue in a Perspex or polycarbonate lip. This way you can experiment with shapes.

A rectangular (parallel) lip will have less rotation thus giving a higher threshold before spin. Better still; a lip narrower at the bottom will reduce the rotation further. To keep the same waggle speed you must keep the average lip width the same.

Alternatively, use a double hinge so that both segments are forced to roll, this will give more resistance to roll and so more force available for waggle.

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman
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Good advice Dave 

I think I mentioned in this thread or some other about using a system wear I used different lexan tails. I did that with my old paddle tail lures. Nothing fancy just two small eye screws is how I secured them for testing 

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I agree with Dave's suggestion about using a double hinge and I would also add some more weight to the front section of the body as low as possible to add more stability. Either that or know you need to work it very slow and methodical. Big fish don't like to chase if they don't have to.

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