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RiverMan

paints and overspray

19 posts in this topic

RiverMan    10

I have been having a considerable amount of hassle with the white paint from Wal-Mart overspraying on to the sides of my baits when doing the belly of the lure. Changes in pressure haven't helped and changing the way in which I hold the bait doesn't seem to make a difference either. I always seem to end up with a thin white "fog" over the sides of the bait that really ruins the finish. If I lay a stencil over the side of the lure I get a clean white line instead of blend like I want. If I try to wipe the paint off after painting I again end up with a "white line" that looks unnatural.

I have noticed that the particle size with the white paint from Wal-Mart is larger than many of the other paints and wondering if this could be the problem. The fluorescent orange is the easiest to spray by far, can blend this stuff at any pressure and it's so easy to put down a perfect line with it. What I am wondering is if a higher quality paint like Createx in white would help me....looking for answers!

Anyone have some thoughts on this?

Thx.

Jed

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Coley    8

Which brand of white paint is giving you the problem??

Walmart has more than one brand of white craft paint.

The one I use is "Apple Barrel Colors", #20403, white

in 8 oz. bottle and have no problem with it.

Coley

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Lure--Prof    11

Hmmm, Jed, I've sprayed some of that white as a base coat after sealing and had no problem, but haven't used it for any detail...I know I had to thin it considerably...One thing about Createx, is that you can take a damp rag and wipe it off, even after it has dried, until you heat set it...but I will say that since I've gone to Createx almost exclusively, and have taken the time to mechanically shake the paint, I've had fewer paint problems of all types...it is no big secret that cheap paints are cheap for a reason, and that it is only through trial and error with the cheap stuff that you can find out what works and what doesn't work as well...I'd say that if other colors are spraying well, you've eliminated any problems with the brush or pressures, so it comes down to the paint. I expect you are thinning and mixing/shaking it the same as the colors that are spraying well?? I bought a can of Krylon primer-sealer recently that I shook and shook, and when I opened it found I had a can full of something very much resembling wet cement, so quality control plus cheap pigments could be at issue here for sure. It wouldn't have run through a garden hose, much less an airbrush. Past that I'd say throw some masking tape a little past your fog line and carry on. Just some thoughts here, I know there are more painterly guys here than I...

Dean

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RiverMan    10

I just looked Coley and its Apple Barrel 20503...probably just a "tint" different that the one you are using. Thx.

Dean..

I think your idea with the tape may be my "best option" at this point. Funny I don't have any problems with other colors just the white. It could be too though that the amount of white I am throwing on is causing part of the problems, not sure. Sure finding it discouraging though, can't seem to get it resoved, will keep trying.

Jed

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i have the same problem with a red plasti-kote, what you can get from the automotive industry is foam edged tape, it has a slightly tacky side and round foam on the other you can run it along the edge of your lure to stop if hazing up the sides, the only thing you have to watch with masking is if you put the paint on abit thick you can get a hard edge which looks terrible, i've also been dabbling with spraying the paint through cardboard with a rectangle shape like a letterbox in so as the card will pick the overspray up and not the lure, it kinda concentrates the spray

just a thought

john

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kellure    1

Jed are you using a shield over the lure's side? If not, try holding the shield about 2" away from the bait and pull your brush back 1'-1.5' back from the bait and shoot it.

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ckarren    0

Jed, you could cut a stencil of your bait pattern. Put a penny under the stencil and spray. The penny will lift it enough that it will let some blending happen just at the edge.

-Corey

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RiverMan    10

Kell,

When you say a "shield" I assume you mean just like a piece of cardboard. I haven't tried what you are saying but I'm a liking the idea! I am assuming that this approach will still allow for a "feathered edge" while keeping the overspray off the sides....yes?

Off to my "real job".

Thanks again guys.

jed

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Mallard    1

I was having a similar problem with the florescent Apple Barrel paints. I picked up some Createx airbrush paint at the craft store found it to perform much better. I always struggled with thinning the cheaper craft paints but I can use the Createx straight form the bottle. It is six times the price and does not go as far, but the reduced aggregation is worth it.

I still use Wal-mart craft paint 75% of the time but I switched to Createx for pearls, Fluorescents and metallic. I will probably use Createx 90% of the time once I use up all my Wal-mart paint.

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RiverMan    10

Once again you guys have proven to be the "best". I plan on putting into action the suggestions you have provided me this evening.

Thank you very much.

Jed :lol:

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jaime    0

hey riverman,

white is a difficult color to use when trying to blend it, especially on a photo finish lure where you want the white to blend to the photo. what I do is I hold the lure in one hand with the exacto knife handle attached to the lure start the spray (off on to the side) and pull the airbrush back until there is a fine mist of paint coming out. now with the paint flowing, direct it above the portion of the lure you want to spray, follow the lure contour and let the overspray cover the lure. it takes some practice and i've painted and re-painted many lures to get the desired effect. I've also tried the other methods mentioned but they still seems to have a hard edge.

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RiverMan    10

Jaime,

What you are describing sounds interesting but I can't follow exactly what you are telling me. Are you saying that you are using the overspray to do the painting? And yes you are right the line where the photo and belly meet is a difficult spot.

Thank you.

Jed

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KcDano    0

If all else fails, you could back tape the edge, which will allow a feathered or tapered edge to the paint. Fold the masking tape back over itself as illustrated in the picture. Good Luck!!

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jaime    0

that's exactly right Riverman! use the overspray to your advantage. you'll need to learn, by trial and error, at what angle and distance you need to hold the lure and the airbrush. I start off airbrushing on a scrap piece of paper and moving the airbrush back until I get a fine mist of spray then while holding the lure at about an 80 degree angle, I'll pass the airbrush above the lure following the contour and let the overspray do it's magic. I learned this technique from my airbrush instructor who taught me that overspray is not necessarily a bad thing and can be used to your advantage. the key is to apply light coats of the overspray until you get the desired effect. you've seen the foilded tiger lure i posted in the gallery. I used the same principle with great results. Try it on a paper cut out of a lure, preferably something black so that you can see the results, and use the white paint you've been talking about re talking about.

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RiverMan    10

Jaime,

So is the paint like "raining down" on the bait then? How far are you holding the brush from the bait? It seems like it would take forever to get the coverage you need by doing using the overspray in this manner.

Jed

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kellure    1

Jed, I cut & use shields made of several different types of harder plastics & actual thick stencil material thats edges are shaped to the bait contour. Apparently Jaime and I use basically the same technique...angle and repeated lite sprays following the bait shape are the key. Gives a nice, soft tapered edge. Good luck

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RiverMan    10

Kellure,

I cut some shields last night in the shape of the baits I'm painting and laid the bait on a table and held the shield just above the bait on one side. I then sprayed the belly and back in. It did a really nice job, no overspray at all. Once I had what I wanted I did go back and smooth out the edge a bit with one or two passes. I am sure with time I will begin to develop my own technique as a result of your suggestion.

Thank you.

Jed

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kellure    1

Cool, glad that tidbit helped. BTW, you've got some great looking baits on your site. Cool bait design as well, bet they will do a number on schoolers.

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