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CoreyH

Piano wire question

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What would be the reason(s) for using piano wire over standard stainless steel wire for things like spinnerbaits or buzzbaits?

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Sounds like a physics question.  @Vodkaman will probably have a great answer haha.  Or put this in the wire baits forum?

  It probably has to do with elastic deformation? I think I used some piano wire once and it will bend and vibrate, but spring back more than SS wire.  I'm just guessing.  I've had large spinnerbaits with SS wire and if a fish thrashes on it and it bends, it stays bent (plastic deformation) When you bend it back it seems to weaken that part. I've had several large muskie ones break at the middle bend because they don't handle 'tuning'.   Perhaps Piano wire can handle this better as well?

Edited by eastman03

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14 hours ago, Vodkaman said:

It is a Young's modulus thing :)

Dave

And that is...?  And how does it apply to sst wire vs piano wire?

 

Edited by mark poulson

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Young's modulus is a measure of elasticity, generally expressed as a graph that demonstrates the springiness and yeald point in a material.

If you take a piece of spring steel, you can bend it, and it will return to the same position. Bend it a little more and you get the same result. But, bend it beyond the yeald point and the material takes a set, it is permanently deformed.

If you perform the same exercise with SST, it will take a set with minimum force. The Young's modulus of SST is way too low for applications that require maintenance of form such as wire spinner baits.

Of course, design is always a compromise. One must weigh up the corrosiveness of spring materials with the long life of stainless materials.

Try to make a twist eye from spring steal and you will be there all day, and hurt your fingers. But, SS is like butter in comparison.

Young's modulus is the technical expression of what we all know.

I sucked you in didn't I :)

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman

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3 hours ago, Vodkaman said:

Young's modulus is a measure of elasticity, generally expressed as a graph that demonstrates the springiness and yeald point in a material.

If you take a piece of spring steel, you can bend it, and it will return to the same position. Bend it a little more and you get the same result. But, bend it beyond the yeald point and the material takes a set, it is permanently deformed.

If you perform the same exercise with SST, it will take a set with minimum force. The Young's modulus of SST is way too low for applications that require maintenance of form such as wire spinner baits.

Of course, design is always a compromise. One must weigh up the corrosiveness of spring materials with the long life of stainless materials.

Try to make a twist eye from spring steal and you will be there all day, and hurt your fingers. But, SS is like butter in comparison.

Young's modulus is the technical expression of what we all know.

I sucked you in didn't I :)

Dave

Hahaha  You sneaky devil!

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Thanks for the replies.  I've seen some spinnerbaits being sold and they seem to tout the piano wire as though it is inherently better, so I wondered if that was the case or not.  I don't think it will sway me one way or the other when looking to purchase.

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20 hours ago, Vodkaman said:

Young's modulus is a measure of elasticity, generally expressed as a graph that demonstrates the springiness and yeald point in a material.

If you take a piece of spring steel, you can bend it, and it will return to the same position. Bend it a little more and you get the same result. But, bend it beyond the yeald point and the material takes a set, it is permanently deformed.

If you perform the same exercise with SST, it will take a set with minimum force. The Young's modulus of SST is way too low for applications that require maintenance of form such as wire spinner baits.

Of course, design is always a compromise. One must weigh up the corrosiveness of spring materials with the long life of stainless materials.

Try to make a twist eye from spring steal and you will be there all day, and hurt your fingers. But, SS is like butter in comparison.

Young's modulus is the technical expression of what we all know.

I sucked you in didn't I :)

Dave

That's the explanation I was expecting! Thank you!

The first one left me a little disappointed...but you didn't let me down.

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