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I have been building my own spinners for a little over a year and have used mostly smaller size inline setup but recently started making bigger sizes 6 and up but my question is 70% of my casts with the new built spinners the line wraps around the back of the spinner blade is it a balance problem? tungsten too close behind the blade? I build as bead, blade, bead,tungsten, bead,then hook

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It is hard to say without seeing it and a size 6 doesn't tell anything. Do you mean a size #6 hook or a blade? What kind of blade and wire diameter?  There are guys that make bass tackle and also musky tackle so the bass stuff would be considered smaller. The same thing as guys that make small trout spinners and bass spinners, one is smaller that the other, you need to provide some context. Are you making a 1/16oz size spinner with a #12 treble hook, or a 3/316oz with a #6 hook? Are you using a French blade or Swing blade and is it on a stirrup clevis or folded clevis? I apologize for asking the questions this way but you aren't going to get any meaningful help without a picture or a detailed description. Your description is vague because there isn't any standard on spinner sizes, most manufactures use their own system for sizing just so you understand why saying a size 6 doesn't help.

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I think it may be a center of gravity thing. 

If the blade is getting fouled on the case, the bait is probably tumbling on the cast, instead of traveling ass first.

Try adding more beads behind the clevis as spacers, so the body begins at the back of the blade.  That way, it should cast truer, like a spook with more weight toward the rear.

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I know Smalljaw will have a solution. My guess is wiresize. .035 is too large IMO. One other may be a spacing issue but Smalljaw can advise if there’s an issue.

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Just underneath the blade place another bead one size smaller with the one you have . can't see if you put one on top but if you did replace it with the smallest bead possible so that it does not interfere wit the tilt. Also a more side ways cast keeps the line from forming an overlap that might foul the blade . Especially if the wind is blowing  That is the only time an inline blade ever failed me on a cast.

 

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Don't put a bead on top.  Put a small bead after the spinner.  Size the wire so it is about half the diameter of the opening in the blade.  Put a larger bead, about half the diameter of the body on next.  Then put the body on last.

Mark is correct about the  balance and the extra bead to push the body back will help.  Toad is correct about the blade tilt being impacted by a bead on top, but that is why I said no bead on top at all.  

It is impossible for me to draw in the forum and I don't have a sketch to give you, but the blade angle when it spins can't hit the body or it will either prevent it from spinning alltogether, or it will tangle like you say you are getting.  Adding extra beads, not too small but not too big, pushing the body back, is the only I know that will fix it.

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There are a couple of small things wrong but nothing too bad. Apdriver mentioned one of them already, .035" on a 1/4oz in-line is too heavy, .028" is much better. The main issue is the blade is 1 size too big. The weight is fine for that size blade but it is Tungsten so it is a little more compact so you have the length of a smaller bait. If you look at a #6 Panther Martin which I think is 1/4oz, you'll notice the bottom of the blade doesn't extend past the lure body. In-line blades ride on the wire so the wire diameter and bead size determine how close the blade lays next to the body. If the wire is too heavy combined with larger beads then the blade sticks out further increasing the likelihood of it catching the line. Then the blade size being a bit too long just provides more area to catch the line when the bait enters the water. So before you make wholesale changes, try dropping the size beads first, then drop blade size and then wire. Start with the easiest thing first, good luck.

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I am using a #4 blade, .026 wire, 3/16 do it worm nose sinker and a  5/32"  bead behind the blade, and a #8 hook. Total weight is a touch over 5/16. I do the same for total weight of 3/16, but with 1/8 worm nose sinker and #3 blade. Messed around with many combos but these are the only ones that did not have any issues. These work great equally with slow and fast retrieves.

spinner.jpg

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Thanks everyone for the replies I will try each and see if it gets better The main reason I have been using a heavier wire is due to the debris I fish around in these tiny creeks I used a smaller wire at the beginning and had a ton of bent lures also with the current being so strong I have been trying tungsten to try and get my spinner in those deep holes faster I noticed last year using lead it was harder for me to get my lure down in the front of those deep holes current kept sucking it to the middle or end of the run I really didn't have all these problems with the lead though and the bead on top is something I tried this season because I saw some lure builder on Facebook make them that way and being the new guy at this I thought I was missing something, Again thank you so much for all the pointers :worship:

Edited by Slayermikefishingnmore
not enough info
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2 hours ago, Slayermikefishingnmore said:

Thanks everyone for the replies I will try each and see if it gets better The main reason I have been using a heavier wire is due to the debris I fish around in these tiny creeks I used a smaller wire at the beginning and had a ton of bent lures also with the current being so strong I have been trying tungsten to try and get my spinner in those deep holes faster I noticed last year using lead it was harder for me to get my lure down in the front of those deep holes current kept sucking it to the middle or end of the run I really didn't have all these problems with the lead though and the bead on top is something I tried this season because I saw some lure builder on Facebook make them that way and being the new guy at this I thought I was missing something, Again thank you so much for all the pointers :worship:

When you say you didn't have the issues with the lead are you talking about everything else being the same? Lead or Tungsten shouldn't make a difference as long as the weight is the same, I mean the difference in size might be better in the current but it shouldn't be a dramatic difference. I think your design will work but you need to make small changes and it might mean that you make a dozen lures to test out. Try the easiest things first and do 1 at a time so you know what change made the difference. The first change I'd make is going to a smaller blade, a size 4 would probably be better and also help your bait get down. If you don't have a smaller blade you can make your wire a little longer, about 1/8" but either change the blade or lengthen the wire, don't do both. 

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I think Mark Poulson nailed it. The CoG is too centered which will cause the lure to tumble in flight.

The same problem is encountered on hardbaits with fixed weight locations and shallow swimming lips that mess with the airflow (the equivalent of the spoon).

The CoG needs to be as much to the rear on the lure as possible (leading the flight).

Make the tungsten weight the last item, add a couple of beads at the front.

Consider darts; the resistance to flight (the spoon) is at the trailing edge, the mass (tungsten) is at the front, in flight.

The spoon, like the feathers of an arrow, tries to hold back the flight, the weight tries to advance the flight. Take a dart and throw it feathers first and see what happens.

Mark is probably the smartest guy on this site. You should all listen to what he says (sorry Mark, but it is true)!

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman
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16 hours ago, Vodkaman said:

I think Mark Poulson nailed it. The CoG is too centered which will cause the lure to tumble in flight.

The same problem is encountered on hardbaits with fixed weight locations and shallow swimming lips that mess with the airflow (the equivalent of the spoon).

The CoG needs to be as much to the rear on the lure as possible (leading the flight).

Make the tungsten weight the last item, add a couple of beads at the front.

Consider darts; the resistance to flight (the spoon) is at the trailing edge, the mass (tungsten) is at the front, in flight.

The spoon, like the feathers of an arrow, tries to hold back the flight, the weight tries to advance the flight. Take a dart and throw it feathers first and see what happens.

Mark is probably the smartest guy on this site. You should all listen to what he says (sorry Mark, but it is true)!

Dave

Hahaha  Clearly you haven't spoke to my three ex wives, or any of my kids.

I will say I've made a lot of mistakes (in lure making) and that, along with all the knowledge shared here on TU, has taught me a lot.

"Too soon old, too late smart" is truly the case for me.

 

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