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RiverMan

The "best" wood sealer

23 posts in this topic

I am currently using a shellac to seal my baits but often wonder if there is something better. I am speaking of the wood sealer, not the final clear coat. I know there are a variety techniques taken by builders that include Devcon, lacquers, primers, etc. What I am wondering is if there is one sealer that clearly stands out above all others.

I think an experiment on the various sealers would prove useful. A guy could take say 5 different baits, number each of them and seal them with different types of products being careful to give each product an "equal" coating....say one coat. Each of the baits would then be weighed to the 10th of gram or finer. One at a time the baits would then be tossed into a pail of water for 10 minutes, towel dried, and then weighed again. This experiment would then be repeated for 20 minute, 40, and 60 minute intervals. The change in weight would indicate the absorbtion of water.

After all this I think we would have a much better idea of which sealer is giving us the best "protection" for our efforts. I do realize that there are other considerations such as ease of application, cost, chemical considerations, etc. Other things to think about are wood type and wood grain, more opened grained woods will likely absorb a greater amount of water and skew results. Variation in results could be eliminated with a larger sample size, say 5 baits per test instead of one.

I would expect that something like Devcon would prove to be hard to beat as a sealer but Devcon is certainly not the most cost effective or convenient product to use as a sealer. I like shellac because it's inexpensive and dries quickly.

Any ideas?

Jed

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there are sealers on the market meant for one purpose, sealing wood.

Our finish shop I work at uses a "water white" vinyl sealer.

Its sprayed on, looks milky like wet polyurethane but dries water clear.

speaking of that, polyurethane makes a good sealer.

Many old timer will boil thier baits in linseed oil to seal it.

My opinion is that epoxies like devcon for a sealer is overkill, but that depends on how durable a finish is desired.

if you do the experiment, Id love to see your findings.

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I use Devcon to seal balsa. The reason I do this is for

the strength it adds to the wood, not for the sealing

properties. On very hard balsa I have used 4-5

coats of shellac.

I have found on Western Cedar it has to be sealed

really good, not to keep water out, but to keep the

color in. It will bleed through over a period of time,

especially on a white bait. Kilz as a primer will

help the bleeding a lot.

Coley

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i often ask myself that same queston i mostly use polyurethane to seal my cedar plugs if i foil wrap them i put the foil i use right on the wood it's the kind i get from the local hardware store that has a sticky backing then i seal that with devcon 2 ton i apply the devcon as thin as possible then lightly sand it when its dry and shoot my paint colors

Jack

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I saw a folk artist on TV recently who uses exterior wood glue for a sealer/primer; he paints it on with a brush and when dry, sands it smooth and begins painting. Alot of the stuff he does is for lawn decoration etc., so it holds up pretty well in Kentucky's weather extremes. I've yet to try it simply because I don't want to add another unknown factor to the lures I've been working on lately...I like an epoxy, usually E-tex, but sometimes devcon for the thin balsa I've been using. If I were making a bunch of thru-wire saltwater lures like Bassmaster does, I wouldn't hesitate to use boiled linseed oil to protect the lures in places other sealers would have a difficult time reaching, whether in the center of the lure, or a little deeper in the wood to help keep water from penetrating tooth marks (for this reason, I'd also consider using it for pike/muskie lures). My everyday sealer for most woods and lures has been Minwax Polycrylic; I dip, it shake off the excess, put it on the dryer, then sand lightly and repeat this. Then I'll prime, or sometimes not; often I'll just spray a couple base coats of white and proceed with the colors. Just my two cents worth.

Dean

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I use stone chip then primer seems to work good. Years ago I played around with PEG not for lures, poly---- e--- glu--- it looks like bits of candle wax dissolved in water. Place the wood in it and by some scientific means it penetrates and replaces any moisture. Once dried it petrifies the wood.It is used in underwater archaeology when they bring old timber out of the water.I would look into it again but I don't have the space---I'm sure it's a great sealer though it will change the density etc

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I've been using boiled linseed oil mixed with mineral spirits 60%-40% and have had no problem with splitting or taking on water. I use it on thru-wired baits so it will get all the way into the thru hole. I just dip it for 30 seconds wipe off excess and hang for about a week to dry. Takes a long time to dry but works for me.

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Well if nothing else it looks like this post has stimulated some good chat. Some of the ideas you guys have are great....would be fun to see just how well each of them works. I agree with Jerry that Devcon for sealing is a bit of an "overkill" but at the same time is a shellac, exterior glue, or polycrylic enough? The test I described above would probably give us an answer to this question. I hope to put this test together sometime this winter and will of course share the results with you guys.

Jed 8O

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Sounds like a interesting experiment Jed...I also just dip mine in minwax polyacrilic,let dry and go.I'd be interested in seeing your results..Nathan

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I forget who posted this idea but it works for me what i use is plastic spoons melted in lacuer thinner Dip bait bodies 3 times then put in bills ,hook hanger and weights then coat with a thin coat of devcon 20min,paint and then top coat with e-tex or devcon so far i,ve had no problems. But i use balsa most all the time so weight has not been a issue

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I forget who posted this idea but it works for me what i use is plastic spoons melted in lacuer thinner Dip bait bodies 3 times then put in bills ,hook hanger and weights then coat with a thin coat of devcon 20min,paint and then top coat with e-tex or devcon so far i,ve had no problems. But i use balsa most all the time so weight has not been a issue

Here's that thread. I've been using that process on my stuff with good results.

http://www.tackleunderground.com/board/viewtopic.php?t=3180&highlight=

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Tally,

Yes, and I particulary like it for balsa lures for the reason that Coley mentioned--it adds structural strength. You also don't have to sand nearly as fine.

Dean

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Thank You-

Devcon is all I use to seal my baits, but this topic was making me wonder. I haven't tried the melting of plastic deal, but that seems like alot of extra work to me.

Tally

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I have used Devcon to seal my baits but I prefer Etex because it is much thinner. I brush it on lightly just after mixing and the wood sucks it up like a sponge. It does not create a coat like Devcon but actually penetrates the wood. It also does not add as much weight to the bait, this is a plus to me when making small top-water lures.

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Thank You-

Devcon is all I use to seal my baits' date=' but this topic was making me wonder. I haven't tried the melting of plastic deal, but that seems like alot of extra work to me.

Tally[/quote']

I'm not trying to convert anyone but let me say this; It doesn't get much easier to seal a plug than it is to dip it in plastic and let it dry. Once you rend the plastic, it's like dipping it in paint. Just my $.02

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Husky-

I was not downing what you do, as I said I have never tried it.

One of the post said:Dip bait bodies 3 times then put in bills ,hook hanger and weights then coat with a thin coat of devcon 20min.

This is the post I thought was extra work. dip 3 times and then devcon? If the dip works, forget about the devcon or if the dip doesn't work forget it and use devcon. Why both? :rolleyes:

Dave

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Husky-

I was not downing what you do' date=' as I said I have never tried it.

One of the post said:Dip bait bodies 3 times then put in bills ,hook hanger and weights then coat with a thin coat of devcon 20min.

This is the post I thought was extra work. dip 3 times and then devcon? If the dip works, forget about the devcon or if the dip doesn't work forget it and use devcon. Why both? :rolleyes:

Dave[/quote']

Were good. :D I didn't take it in a negative way. You can dip it in the plastic about once every 20 min (just give it enough time o dry) It's just for a basecoat and sealer. In my experience, The Epoxy or Etex is for that finish coat and deep luster, not for an additional sealer coat. If the lure isn't sealed, even the Epoxy will pop due to a poor foundation. Dipping gets it into every crack and crevice, IMHO. Even those who use Epoxy as a base, will also use it as a top coat for that deep finish.

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Good to hear it. Being new to this and hearing things that don't make sense to me make me ask questions which some take as negatives.

I read your post where you use 5 oz Solo white cups and a thinner with Methyl and Toulene. What is the name on the thinner and what is the mix ratio? how many cups to how much thinner? does it take 3 dips to fully seal the bait? How much weight does it add compared to one coat of Devcon?

Thanks, Dave

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Good to hear it. Being new to this and hearing things that don't make sense to me make me ask questions which some take as negatives.

I read your post where you use 5 oz Solo white cups and a thinner with Methyl and Toulene. What is the name on the thinner and what is the mix ratio? how many cups to how much thinner? does it take 3 dips to fully seal the bait? How much weight does it add compared to one coat of Devcon?

Thanks' date=' Dave[/quote']

It is just a strandard Lacquer thinner. I just posted those ingredients because that was what was in it. Just disolve about 10 cups into about 6 oz of thinner. A used olive bottle works great. When it has totally dissolved STIR it real well. Let it settle and then pour off the thinner that sits apart from the plastic and replace it with fresh thinner. You can also use white plastic utensils in place of cup. The Colored utensils didn't work as well as the white. The best consistency is that of watery paint so add thinner or plastic to get to that. 3 dips should do the trick but you might be able to get away with 2 dips. Check out my tutorial for a pic of the dipping. JMHO, but it is lighter than Devcon but I didn't weigh it. Anyone have a triple beam scale? :rolleyes:

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Thompsons is nothing more than kerosene and parafin wax. Won't hold paint due to the wax.

Has anyone ever tried any of the decking products like Thompsons Water Seal?

Jed

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