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TackleTester

Airbrush or...?

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Hey guys! Sorry to keep asking all these questions, but I am just getting started into this luke-making thing, and I am only 14 so I unfortunately do not have the experience that some of you do. But anyway, 14 I don't have an unending pile of money to spend on this hobby. This is always something I have wanted to do since I was 4, yes 4, but I thought it was something that would never happen until I found this site. I was wondering if there were any other ways to paint other than an airbrush because I know all of this can get expensive with the compressor and everythink. Also, if someone gets a chance, if they could possibly compile a list of items I will need to begin this process (very specific if possible.) This is something that I have a great passion for and do not just want to do it halfway. I want to go all out, and with Christmas coming up and assuming I get the job I applied for at Gander Mountain, I think I can make it a reality. Thanks a lot, and no rush. Just whenever you get a chance. I greatly appreciate it, and one day I will find a way to make it up to you.

Catch em up

Brian

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Brian,

For xmas you might think about having someone buy you the cd series that Lunge put together on making your own baits...you can buy it on this site.

If there was one tool I think it would be difficult to live without I would say it is a bandsaw. You can cut your baits out with a coping saw by hand but it's much more difficult and almost impossible to get a straight enough cut for the bill. You can buy one for about 100 dollars at Home Depot or similar type stores. You might look around and find one used too for half that amount. The other thing you will need is a drill...you will need it to drill holes for the weight in the belly of the baits and also to drill holes for the hooks. The drill I have is cordless but any drill would be fine. A flat sanding belt is a very nice tool too, it lets you shape baits after they have been cut out on the band saw. I would also get one flat wood file, this will be used to round the edges of the bait off after you have cut it out. Yes you can paint your baits with rattle cans...I did for a very long time and they work fine. Learn to cut out stencils from plastic milk jugs, playing cards, and other such materials that will allow you to make the gills, eyes, bars, and other such details on your baits. After that you will need to build some type of machine to turn your lures while they are drying. You can do this by hand with Devcon but it's not much fun. I would do a search on this topic and see what you can come up with. Keep asking questions and in a years time you will be an expert!

I attached a picture for you of a bait my 14 year old made a few weeks ago.

Jed :D

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Wish I was 14 starting out making lures,the missus says I act like it when I'm in the middle of some new exiting ( to me) invention.What Jed's telling you seems good advice I'd just differ on the band saw get yourself a GOOD scroll saw less danger and less space and you could also finish your lures with two part laquer,no need for machines turning to dry.Lastly I'd say go make friends with someone who has a router table so when you've cut your shapes he could (JUST) round of the edges for you.

good luck hope you know what your letting yourself in for.

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All of these were done with rattle cans or with foil and rattle cans.

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So while it's not the best way to go, it fits well into a 14 yr olds budget and work area. Just keep the stink OUTSIDE.

WELCOME ABOARD AND GOOD LUCK.

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From a guy who is still using a hand scroll saw, & old fashioned :) start small with handtools, when you've got the hang of it & the $$ go for the machines. Nothing like good elbow grease for a start & like Husky says, rattle can when used properly can produce results too. When you've exhausted the capabilities of your hand tools, you'll know when to go for machines. KIS - keep it simple for a start.

Have fun.

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Just keep at it, patience and time will pay off. This is from a spray can. Like Jed said, ?Just use a stencil.?

Good luck and keep us posted on your progress. The only dumb question is the one you don?t ask.

-Corey

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Brian,

You've got some very good advice so far and more to come I'm sure. For us older guys it's real easy to just buy the tool you need when you need it, especially if you're impulsive. That said, being 14 has it's advantages - you don't have lots of money to buy every tool you need. What you can do is be resourceful.

Talk to your high school shop teacher and see if they will let you use the school's woodshop. Take a woodworking course. Start a woodworking club or better yet a fishing club - you'd be surprised what companies will give you, that's right GIVE YOU when it's for school clubs and especially childern/young adults. It keeps youout of trouble and they know that you'll eventually buy components from them when you have the money.

Check yard sales and flea markets. Ask neighbours who mighthave some of those tools. Cut their grass, shovel the snow, whatever - help them and they'll help you.

Start small and buy the RIGHT tools. If you buy quality tools, you'll buy them once - so research before you buy. Ask us, check the net and ask your school's shop teachers. Get some hand tools, heck even a pocket knife will work, although it is more limiting.

Like Corey said...ASK, ASK, ASK!

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Oh yah ... Jed thanks and you better watch you're teaching your 14 year old or the BB Co.'s gonna get some competition. That's some nice work they did!

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When I started making cranks at age 14, I used just a few hand tools.

I worked with bass wood.

Bass wood blocks

#2 Pencil

Cooping saw

Wood carving set

A few wood files(1 flat fine, 1 rounded)

Sand paper

Pocket knife

needle nose pliers

a 4" c-clamp

egg beater type drill

Couple of small drill bits

Stainless steel wire

Devcon epoxy cement

split shots for weighting

broken drafting triangles (for the lips)

Small paint brushes

Testors model paint

A bath tub for tuning

A issue of fishing facts that had a article about small crank baits for monster crappies is what got me going.

There was no mirco crank baits out there at the time ....

So I made them.

And there has been no turning back since.

I wish I had a forum such as this to consult back then or any one for that matter.

The baits I made in the winter caught fish in the spring and I was very happy.

Good luck with this, feel free to ask ?'s.

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I started repainting and making lures when I was about your age and I still have some of the lures I worked on. I used spray cans and testors brush on paint. I got into airbrushing in High School but did not stay with

it, now I wish I had.

I realize funds are short and there are alot to buy, but airbrushing is neat skill to have and you can use it for so much more than lures.

Harbor Frieght has an airbrush for $10 that they put on sale for $5 every couple months. You can get a water trap and regulator for about $15. You can hook this up to an low end compressor, I have even used a Black & Decker Air Staion. (Now I know this is not a preferred way to work, but it will work and is a very low cost option to learn with). This will give you a taste for what an airbrush can do. Also, look for a used airbrushes at garage sales, flea markets. Tell the person what you plan to do with it and I guarentee they will give you a better deal than any of us old foggies would get.

I think a drill press is a extremely valuable tool, and they can be found very cheaply too. I have ruined a couple lures with my hand drill, the drill press makes it perfect everytime. I bought a set of sanding drums and I now have my drill press doing double duty as a sander.

Good lick and have fun.

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The boyscouts are a way to get started, get together a group of parents that are willing to drop a few bucks for materials and you are on the way to making some lures and earning some badges. Plus chances are some of the men leaders will have the tools and be willing to help out. If that doesnt work for you, get some wooden dow rods from Lowes or Home Depot and start carving topwaters with them, they are inexpensive. Ask for a dremel for Christmas. One of the best things I can suggest is to stop by a local woodshop, cabinet maker, any place like that and ask if they have scrap wood...they all do, typically they trash it, and most of the time you can get it for free. Last thing...study the dimensions and characteristics of shelf lures & draw, draw, draw.

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Thanks to all of you for the responses. It has really helped. As I get everything put together it sounds like my dad is going to let me get whatever I need because he supports this also. By the way, I started a fishing club last year at school, but our moderator never does anything, except once a year. Thanks again.

Catch em up

Brian

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