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woodsac

Lathe Tools

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I'm thinking about picking up a mini lathe. After reading all the feedback, a Grizzly seems like a good choice.

Looking at their site, I need to know the difference between a turning set and a chisel set.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?ItemNumber=G9247&viewtype=accessories&gid=B6D36891-3D28-4EEF-91FF-9DC765A49C14&site=grizzly

I'll be turning fairly large stuff, 7-10". Any recommendations for tools or accessories I might need?

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Hi Woodsac,

You will want turning tools (also called lathe chisels). I would suggest a roughing gouge, a parting tool and a skew chisel at a minimum. If you will be cutting any small coves; a small spindle gouge would be handy.

Buy the best ones you can afford. Cheap lathe tools lose their edge quickly and require frequent re-sharpening.

Hope this helps. If I can be of further help to you, shoot me a PM.

Count Draculure

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Woodsac,

The Count is right on. Basically the major difference between the chisels and the turning tools is the length of the handle. Longer handles will give you more leverage and are generally safer to use. Good luck.

Volp1

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Man, some of the chisels are more then the lathe 8O

I found a place to get the Delta 46-730 8 piece set for $90. I know it's not the best, but I just can't fork out $150 for a set right now. :( Any objections? Or better yet, anyone know where to get a good set for less?

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My first lathe cost $200 many many years ago, the tools for it, cost another $400-$600. The lathe was a base model adequate but not fancy, the tools were top of the line. I would say that would be normal to have the tools cost more, for general turning work. For fish lures you don't need that much of an assortment, but you want something with good quality steel that takes an edge and keep it.

My current lathe is worth around $3000, top of the line, European made copy lathe running at 220v. I'm still using the turning tools I purchased 20 years ago to replace them now I would expect to pay $2000. I have a British made chuck and accessories for doing small and special work - that cost $500 - more than my first lathe. Total overkill for making lures. In fact my first lathe would probably be better, the current lathe's copy attachment has to be moved out of the way. But when I go big time and want to turn out 1000's of lures a day ... LOL

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:D Hi there, I have a craftsman 8 piece turning tool set which I hardly ever use. Its a good set but I made a tool I ground down out of an old file that I use 99 % of the time. Files are very hard and hold a good edge. I use a water wheel with a power leather strop to sharpen my tools to a razor edge. That machine for sharpening the tools was $800.00 You can hand strop with leather and its not very hard to learn or they have a small leather wheel you can put in a drill for power stropping. It takes a little practice but works awesome. I have a small sharpening shop so I do all my own saws, tools, planer knives, dado heads, and router bits. If I can help anyone out to learn how to sharpen something I'm all ears and would be glad to help you out. Thank you. Ken Schmitz

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.

Buy the best ones you can afford. Cheap lathe tools lose their edge quickly and require frequent re-sharpening.

YES YES , this is very true , I went with the cheap ones at first and they di well for a little bit but didnt hold and edge as well and are harder to get a good edge back on .

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OK, so I just learned that Growler has tools that I will never, ever be able to afford.

Ken is willing to help teach me how to sharpen cheap tools, and Toby agrees to buy the best ones I can afford.

But, nobody answered my question :( Can I go with the set from Delta? If the Delta set is no better then the Harbor Freight HSS (which I highly doubt) then I won't waste the money.

To be honest, I am the type that would rather make a small investment to start out learning and decide if I want to continue with the hobby. Then if I decide I'm interested, make a good investment in the future. Why spend good money for something I might get rid of and lose money on the sale?

Thanks for all the help so far with my lathe questions!

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I just bought a used lathe from my friend who is an experienced woodworker, he has thousands of $$$ worth of turning tools. His favorites are the ones he made himself. He suggested I purchase the set from HSS to get started then acquire better tools as I progressed. He also told me to expect to sharpen them often.

Also, his comment on the Grizzly lathe is their quality is not what it used to be, they have a good reputation but no longer use the same components. He felt it would probably be fine for lures, but there are better options. His mini lathe is a Jet.

If you can wait a little while on the lathe you may look into picking up used one. Most areas have wood crafting clubs, you can check to see if they have a turning group. It may be worth inquiring about used equipment as well as classes. I have found wood crafting clubs to be very helpful to newbies and it seems wodd crafters are always upgrading their equipment.

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Hey Woodsac, I'm not telling you to buy cheap tools. I am telling you not to buy a whole bunch of tools you might never even use. Buy the best you can afford. What I was trying to get across is that you can make a few tools yourself and they will hold up as good as any expensive tool. I have never used any real expensive tools Just trying to help you save some money. Even good tools need to be sharpened alot if you use them alot. Leather puts the best possible edge on them. Leather can maintain or bring back a real sharp edge if you don't wait too long. Eventually any tool will have to be ground. Heat is the worst enemy. Thats why I use a water wheel. An old timer once told me when you take chisels or turning tools to a shapening shop, if you see sparks flying grab your tools and run. Good Point. I hope this helps and if not email me. Thank you Ken Schmitz

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Thanks Ken :D I think I'm gonna start with a couple of simple chisels from Sears. When it's time to sharpen I'll be pulling on your ear :wink:

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:D Hey Woodsac, I felt someone pulling on my ear, was that you?? I forgot to tell you when you buy a new chisel they are not very sharp. I didn't say they won't work. If I wouldn't have seen this myself I maybe wouldn't believe how sharp you can really get these. I would be more than glad to help you any way I can. Thats why we are all here, to help one another. Thanks and have a great day. Ken

PS one thing I forgot to mention which is extremely important. If you get one of those leather wheels for a drill or drill press You must make sure the wheel is turning away from the cutting edge instead of into the cutting edge like when you use a grinding wheel.

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Hi Woodsac, an answer to your question is the Delta Tools will work fine and have everything you will need to start. I am not a tool expert but have built a lot of saw dust. If you are a hobby builder the Delta tools may be all you will ever need. The secret is to keep them clean and sharp, don't open paint cans with them. A thin coat of oil will go a long way in keeping them nice, just wipe them down before using.

A lot will depend on the material you are working. Most of the woods talked about here will not be a problem. If you happen to build fishing rods the cork will dull an edge faster than almost amy wood so be extra careful.

Please see http://www.laymar-crafts.co.uk/linkn.htm for some fine pointers on sharpening tools and their care.

You don't have to be rich to own nice tools, just careful.

JR

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