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Growler

Bassword lure undercoat

17 posts in this topic

I've been woodworking as a hobby for many years, and kept meaning to make some lures. I finally ran something off my lathe today, and ended up using water based artists aryclic gouache as an undercoat - mostly because it was handy. I'm going to be hand painting with acrylics.

However, tonight I was lookng around the web for info, and read that a sealer coat should be used before the undercoat.

But all the exterior sealer finishes I have are oil based - and apart from not wanting to use them with up-close work indoors, I'm not sure putting acrylic paint over oil base is a great idea.

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Just use a white base coat of the same paint. You don't need to seal the wood. If you use a high quality clearcoat that is tough and you apply it right then you will be just fine. No water will get to the paint or the wood.

Skeeter

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You know I always seal my baits with a shellac before painting but I am beginning to think Skeeter is right. If water gets past the etex or devcon and to the paint I really think you are done regardless of whether you sealed the bait. My experiments on baits have proven this to be true.

Jed

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I'm planning on using a 2 part epoxy clear coat over the acryclic.

My concern is that in actual use, chipping might occur that would break through both the top coat, acryclic and undercoat and get to the wood. Using a penetrating oil sealer soaks into the wood and provides a depth of protection - rather than just surface coverage. I use that on outdoor furniture but would prefer to avoid if I can. It requires a mask for proper protection when applying.

I would not consider using shellac, as it's not water resistent. I have used Binz shellac based undercoat [it's a special base caot that can be used to seal smoke and water damage prior to painting] on some furniture made from paper coated plywood that was soaking up the finish and oil based primer like a sponge. It's incredible for that, but that was for indoor furniture.

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If you use balsa then you can do a clearcoat of epoxy and just scuff it a little before you paint it. After painting clearcoat again. The reason this won't work with hardwoods is because the epoxy will add too much weight to the bait and makes it hard to weight properly. Basswood might take the epoxy. I would try it if you are that concerned about it. With balsa it will also add stregnth to the wood. Other than that Riverman is right. If your clearcoat is not put on properly or is some wimpy stuff like Envirotex, then you could have a problem and there is really nothing that you can do. Use the Devcon and make sure that your bait is completely coated and you will be just fine.

Skeeter

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Just my 2 cents, but I'll put my disolved plastic concoction against anything. Plus, aside from sealing and waterproofing, it gives a great platform to paint on.

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Husky, is your melted plastic method described in another thread somewhere?

Nevermind - I found the monster thread on the subject.

Search first - ask later.

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A couple questions for Husky:

I use Etex as an undercoat to keep the cedar from bleeding through and it does create a smooth base to paint on. I like Etex because it is thin enough to penetrate the wood an it does not add much weight.

I am thinking about trying your plastic sauce receipt this weekend.

Do you think I could get by with one dip in order to create a very thin, light coat?

Have you tried letting the bait soak for a little while for better penetration, or do you feel that would be unnecessary?

Thanks!

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I undercoat basswood cranks, not to waterproof for fishing but so the wood's grain will not raise in any of several building processes. I float test my cranks before installing belly weight, plus I use a water based wood filler and acrylic paints. Any of these will raise grain if not undercoated. I use quick dry polyurethane on basswood and Devcon on balsa cranks (to undercoat and fortify simultaneously).

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A question for BobP or Coley, I just did something different on this next batch of Balsa lures Im making. I followed Coley's tutorial on inserting belly weights into a small Balsa wood lure except... I actually used a Water Gremlin Dipsy Swivel Sinker in two of the lures. The first is in the 1/8 size second is 3/16ths ouncers. I epoxied in the Water Gremlin and the Epoxy of course did not completely fill in the hole, it sure held the dipsy swivel in place.. so thats good! The question is, Is a latex wood filler acceptable in filling in the remaing amount of gap? I usually use a Two Part LocTite wood filler that is hard as nails. The problem is when you go to shape and sand, that stuff is so hard that the balsa and that become shaped and sanded differently. When I am completed with the lure from sand and shaping, as prescribed by the Bait Doctors here, I will epoxy the lure for added protection, then base coat! Give me some feedback, is this acceptable? Thanks Cody

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Bass, I've been using the off the self cheap wood filler and have not had any problems. It sands real smooth with 220.

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I use a material called Micro-Fill, it's light as balsa and sands

like balsa and is same color as balsa.

Coley

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A couple questions for Husky:

I use Etex as an undercoat to keep the cedar from bleeding through and it does create a smooth base to paint on. I like Etex because it is thin enough to penetrate the wood an it does not add much weight.

I am thinking about trying your plastic sauce receipt this weekend.

Do you think I could get by with one dip in order to create a very thin' date=' light coat?

Have you tried letting the bait soak for a little while for better penetration, or do you feel that would be unnecessary?

Thanks![/quote']

Mallard, don't pay the ransom, I escaped! :rolleyes: :oops: Never saw this. 'til now. I use it mostly for foam, but have uses it with my balsa models. If you let it sit in the stuff for a few seconds, it should be enough. With wood, you may want to sand with very fine paper, ie 600 or higher. (THANKS TALLY). You can recoat very quickly, but I'd give it a day to totally evaporate out before putting a finish on it. I'd stick with 2 dips, minimum.

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I?m with husky.....

Since I followed his instructions and found the correct point of his "magic" formula, I never used anything else.

I?m happy with 2 dips for wood (balsa or cedar) and 3 dips for foam...... A very important point is to let the bait settle for at least a day and light sand them prior to the next dip or paint........

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I use Elmer's white wood filler that comes in a squeeze tube at the home center. It's water soluable and dries quickly. It is not especially durable but durable enough, and the Devcon clearcoat takes care of any fragility. It's easy to sand with 400 grit paper - very like plaster. I push it in the hole and build it slightly above level, then put a few drops of water on my finger and pat it down. This latter trick levels it out nicely and there's almost no sanding to do later. I usually put my weight (and the filler) ahead of the belly hook hanger, which is an area that doesn't get much banging on a lipped crankbait. I do waterproof the bait beforehand with polyurethane so the grain won't get raised. If I were making musky or saltwater lures, I'd consider a durable solvent based filler with fibers but the Elmer's has worked fine for me on bass and striper baits.

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