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badfish03

Air Brush Basics for Dummies :D

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I would like to try my hand at repainting some old cranks so am thinking about buying a entry level airbrush.

Whats the difference between a single stage and double stage gun?

Which is the better type for this application?

Any recommendations for airbrushes to start out with? Probably between 60-90 price range.

I have a old badger compressor and hose from when i used to paint model aircraft but my old airbrush is long gone.

Robert

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basically...

Single action brushes let you control pressure, but not paint flow & mix air and paint externally. Kind of a finer version of a spray gun. Double action brushes mix paint internally, and control both air pressure and paint flow with the trigger/button. I think most of us are probably using and prefer double action brushes, typified by the venerable Paasche VL or the Iwatas. Gives you more control for color blending and detail work.

Should be able to get into a Paasche for about $50-60. Iwatas will be quite a bit higher, some swear they are better and worth it. Will also need some extra needles and cones in the various sizes. I would go ahead and pick up some of the rubber trigger washers also...if one of those goes out you are out of business until you replace it. Good set of cleaning brushes helps if you are going to shoot Createx or the other acrylics.

A good compressor set-up will make a world of difference. The acrylics require the ability to run some fairly high psi's at times. I have used a TC2000 from SimAir (see Dixie Arts) and really enjoy it...quiet, foot switch, good moisture trap, will push paint with multiple brushes attached and all valves open using a manifold. Shoots well from 15psi to 50+psi.

Good luck and enjoy the challenge!

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After reading through several pages of advice in the archives, after sending my question :rolleyes: I dont think my little compressor is gonna work too well. I also started looking on ebay for several brands and styles of airbrushes.

In my usual impulsive and impatient style :lol: I picked up a Badger 155-7 Anthem on EBay. Couldn't refuse for the price with shipping and all it only cost me 40.00 and its from someone my wife has bought from in the past. Sides its new and 20-25.00 cheaper than Dixie or West Coast Air for the same model and set.

So what else will I need to pick as far as spare parts etc. to get going. Anything different from what Dave posted?

I've got a 35.00 dollar Sears credit thats been eating a hole in my pocket for a while so I will probably upgrade to a small 1.5hp 3 gallon portable that they have on sale right now. So what do I need to go with the compressor to work this gun off of?

Also what kind of paint will be best to begin with? (I know this is a subjective question but at least you guys have shot more paints than I)

Robert

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that compressor you got is fine for that brush, I used a two gallon for years and only recently got given a four gallon. the one you got is more than enough it;s only a airbrush not a impact gun, once you fill the puppy up and start painting it will come on to get pressure up rarely

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I just want to clarify that Single-Action brush is not the same thing as an external mix brush--My Badger 200 is a not inexpensive Single action Internal-mix brush (compared to the extrernal mixers). The difference between my brush and a Dual action brush is, with the dual action, all the mixing is controlled on the trigger. With a single action internal mix, the mix is controlled by manually adjusting the needle setting. In other words, a single action accomplishes the same end as a Dual-action, it just gets there differently, like the difference between an automatic transmission and a manual tranny. By comparison, an external mix brush would be like a single speed...Hope this helps.

Dean

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IF you're at this subject i have a question too! What model of Paasche is the one on cabela's? It only says Paasche Aribrush. I tried to find the exact model on their mother site, but there are to many models that are very similar. I really need to know.

Is it true that you can shoot lines as fine as 0,3mm or something like that. For me it seems almoust SF.

I use a single action airbrush, and i'm kinda regretting that i didn't buy a dual action, but i think it's a good way to start....

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You can definitely shoot fine lines with a Paasche, even with the #5 tip. Mostly an issue of paint viscosity, psi, and practice. Shooting fine lines is probably the hardest technique to learn. Helps if you move across the bait quickly (preventing build up and splatter) and keep the brush close to the bait.

The Paasche brush at Cabelas is a VL, double action. Not a very good price on that set. Should be able to get into a complete VL set for $50 to $65 USD. I prefer the Paasche Millennium (needles, cones, tips same on both brushes) but that has more to do with the size. If you have small hands or are going to paint for several hours the VL is kind of a beast.

Lots of love/hate on the VL's. From email and PM's I've exchanged, a lot of guys get down on the brush because they try to make it do things they should not. Especially when shooting C-tex, a lot depends on viscosity and psi...get either dialed in wrong and the VL will just hiss and spit at you, get both right and you will shoot some super baits.

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Had some more practice today with the airbrush. I'm ghetting better with each bait. As i mentioned i have a single action brush. I can make very thin lines with mine too, but need to move it fast across the surface, exactly like dtrs5kprs sayd. I thought that with those dual action ones it goes somehow different. I'll have to practice even more, so i can work on details even better. It's a pitty that i can't keep my hands as steady as i want them too, and that's a problem when shoting thin lines.

Thanks dtrs5kprs. It's good to know that i could buy e cheaper one. Now if you could tell me(us) where i coul buy it from(future project), other than E-BAY, because they don't really like to deliver in romania.

I would like to try other paint than acrylic, because it gets build up very fast on the needle(dryes very fast). I can't get my hands on c-tex(yet), so if you could recomend me something else.....I think i'll start buying automotive paint, and see how it goes.

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Createx. Good colors, widely available, can get some really nice effects. Compatible with devcon, e-tex, and flex coat. Also a good hazard free paint.Biggest issue is due to its thickness. Most people who have told me of troubles have not been thinning enough, not shooting enough psi, or trying to shoot thru the wrong needle and tip assembly.

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So do I need to use an extender with the createx or will just adding water work for thinning it?

Also is Createx likely to be available locally and if so where?

Robert

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You can thin createx with water. Extender is actually used to increase transparency and reduce the color. Plain transparent medium wil do the same thing. Both will have a thinning effect, but you will still need water to thin the paint. If using medium or extender you will also want to use retarder to keep the tip clear. Not really as complicated as it looks, just have to play with it.

Best places to find createx are mostly on-line. Can sometimes find it at Michaels Craft Store and similar, Dick Blick stores usually have some in stock. An auto paint store (or cycle detail supply shop) may stock the Auto Air colors.

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Hi dtrs5kprs I just started using createx i have thinned it with water but it seems that i can only put very thin coats on or it will run. I am using a badger 150 with psi between 10 to 20. The paint just seems to run alot. Am i thining to much or wrong tip, psi. What would you recomend. It also seems like i am getting alot of over spray. My brush maybe my problem i have shot alot of vinyle paint and acetone through it. Thanks for your help.

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If you can consistently push C-tex at 10-20psi you probably have it thinned too much. I use 10-20psi to get a splatterback effect on rootbeer baits just because it won't fully mix the air and the paint at that pressure. There are lots of references to thinning c-tex to a milk like consistency, but I have had no success with paint that thin...maybe milk with lots of chocolate syrup is more accurate.

Try backing off on the water and run your psi up to at least 30. An example: tonight I am shooting phantom or ghost craws with very thin and extended createx (for the see thru effect) at about 40-45psi. Paint is going on flat and dry, unless I foul up and trigger too much paint flow. I am blow dring between layers of color. For sides, bellies, and blending you want lots of air and very little paint. You can do this with the trigger, lots of air, but release minimal paint. Try shooting on a nice white basecoat...should be able to see the paint leave the gun and hit the bait in a dry, flat finish, a light strip of color with each stroke. Subsequent strokes will build the color to the value you want, can't do it all in a few strokes.

If your paint looks wet when you shoot it, it may be too thin, too much paint being released by the trigger, possibly wrong tip & needle (but a medium is usually fine), or a psi problem. You also need to trigger the brush and move your strokes right along...moving slowly will cause excessive build up/overspray/runs. I also like to blow dry the bait after the first layer of color...makes the next layers cover better and lets you identify areas that are weak in coverage. If you've been shooting other liquids I would certainly break down the brush and clean all components thoroughly.

Overspray is a fact of life. Best results will come when you plan on it and use it to your advantage. Example: Shooting sides on a base coat and belly color...to avoid overspray on the belly color, work from the belly up in light strokes leading to heavier application of color. This way your overspray will end up in the middle of an area that you are going to make the same color anyway. Keep a second brush or cup with your belly color ready to blend the color change.

Try to think of using an airbrush as shooting color not paint. When everything is dialed in correctly that is what you will be doing. Color will jump out of the brush and cover the bait, but you should not really see "paint" in the liquid sense on the bait. Shooting vinyl or lacquer kind of puts that bugaboo in your head, but it is not helpful with the acrylics.

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Glad I could help, that's what we are all here for. Feel free to email or PM if you have more Q's or problems.

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One of my hobbies used to be building/painting model aircraft. While I'm just getting serious about making my own baits, I've been using airbrushes for quite some time.

I have a Paasche VL which was my first airbrush, I like this but only use it when shooting large surfaces as color changes and clean up can be a little involved.

I also have a Thayer&Chandler(now owned by Badger) Omni 4000 which I love! Single needle, gravity feed, easy to cleanup and change colors.

I've seen mention of Createx paints being used to paint lures, I can't find it locally is it something BearAir or Dixie would carry?

Also what other types of paints can you use? I know model builders use laquer's (though I haven't and to be honest I'm afraid to, not becuase of health reasons though I have a good spraybooth and 4 stage respirator).

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Dixie carries c-tex, though I think they are a little slow, and seem to have out of stock issues. Also available at Dick Blick, some Hobby Lobby/Michaels, airbrush-depot.com, and etc.

I think cullin8s is shooting an auto paint. Most of us are using one or the other of the acrylics.

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AC Moore also carries the C-tex paints, about the same selection as Micheal's. You can also try stopping by your local nail salon and asking them where they buy the airbrush paints from.

Don't worry about the funny stares you will get from the nail techs as you walk in, that is normal! :lol:

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