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Principles of lure design?

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Hi everyone,

I'm trying to create my own original bass and muskie/pike baits. My problem is that I don't really understand what goes into making a good (fish catching) bait. I'm wondering if anyone can give me some pointers. I own "The Complete Book of Lurecraft", but I still don't understand everything. I think I'm trying to make it too complicated when I start bringing fluid dynamics and engineering principals into play.

Thanks in advance,

Brock

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Take a real good look at the forage species in the areas you are fishing. Specifically, take note of the size/shape and coloration of the local forage and how they swim. Thats what I do when trying to design a new plug. I want to match what they are used to seeing.

Andrew

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As like above there is some good ideas. I think also you want it to look like a wounded fish swimming along as for an easier target for a lager fish to take advantage of. if you are fishing for muskie and pike a slow rolling side to side action works well. I know from experience that jointed lures work well in this appilcation. And they also like the look of real bait fish. And with these big fish you lure size will have to start at 12 inches at least to be in the range of these monster fish. Big fish like big meals so as they don't have to work as hard and waste energy.

I hope this helps you out a little.

Robby.

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You are right to a point Robby. Some folks just see to make things more complicated than it needs to be. You don't need to be an engineer, but there are things that we all have learned along the way that we still apply to our bait making today. What questions do you have about design. What in the books have they told you that you are having questions about. Let us know. We would be glad to help. The firs thing that I can suggest to you is that you select either a bass or muskie bait and stick to it untill you are happy with the way that it works. Select only one and stick with it. You will learn alot of priciples by doing that. Those same priciples will work with the other styles of baits in one capacity or another. Jumping around to different types of baits only complicates things. Concentrate on making one bait well instead of making several different baits half @$$.

Skeeter

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Only thing I can add is to sketch and draw alot. Ideas begin to take shape once its on paper and out from between the ears. Get a solid sketch, use quality wood, parts and components and you're on your way.

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Read Joe Bucher's "Cranbait Secrets". You'll learn a lot from this resource. As for fluid dynamics they obviously come into play, but you don't have to know all about the principles to make a bait that catches fish.

Fluid dynamics really come into play when you're designing a bait with a lip. If you're cutting a lip yourself make absolutely sure it's symmetrical. One of the biggest failures will be with uneven lips.

Expect to make a lot of firewood before you make a GOOD bait.

Nice paint jobs will impress fishermen - just look on this board and watch the kudos we give each other and usually very well deserved, but a bait with the right action will impress the fish regardless of the paint job. Some of my ugliest (wouldn't sell a bait to a blind man) baits have caught the most fish. Us, we like the pretty ones.

Lastly, DON'T give up - persevere and you will succeed.

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Hey Brock,

I didn't realize it until now but you are about 30 miles from me. I was raised in Walla Walla and now live in Pendleton. I will be driving through College Place tomorrow evening for work....small world eh? I would be happy to stop by your place sometime to talk about baits. Perhaps you are involved with the college there?

Listen to what the guys are telling you, it's all great advice. Skeeter is right too, pick one bait and stick with it until you figure it out. The other piece of advice I would give is to pick a bait you like and make one somewhat similar. Home depot has a great selection of woods to choose from.

jed

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Jed,

I would be glad for you to come by sometime to talk about baits. I'm going to warn you right now that my house is a mess with me always bringing my lure making supplies into the living room :D I actually attend Walla Walla Community College right now, but my mom works at Walla Walla College's book store.

I would really like to see the setup you have, especially how you make your baits! I actually have all the pictures of your BeerBelly Glider's and your Turmoil Gills on my PC so I can look at them, and hopefully some of your talent will rub off :wink:

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Some of my questions about design are as follows:

How do you make a lure that will dive to a specified depth?

How do you create a wiggle in a lure? Tight versus wide?

What does the shape of the diving plane effect?

Those are just some starters.

Thanks,

Brock

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Brock,

Do a search on these topics...you might specifically do a search on "skeeter" as the author as he has spent a great deal of time in the past discussing bill angle, length, etc. There are some great minds here just keep asking and keep looking.

I received my first degree at WWCC many moons ago. I was raised in Walla2 and spent a million hours chasing smallmouth on the surrounding rivers. Get ready now and you will be ready for some serious smallmouth action on the Walla Walla in about a month.

Jed

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Those are the soundest advice you're getting from the old pros there Brock.

However contrary to what you want to do in designing new lures, my advice is for u to copy a fish catching lure that you know how to fish it in and out. By learning this way, you set yourself a target as to what that lure is suppose to do; if your lure doesn't cut it you'll be able to study the original lure & thus learn why your lure doesn't tick. After you've got that one lure and the variations (change lip angle/shape, vary body profile/width, taper the tail etc etc) studied to death, you'll find making/designing you own lures then comes naturally.

PS: When Jed (Riverman) comes visiting, make sure you get a place ready for him to sleep over and then drain his brain as much as you can. You've got a great teacher there so used him thoroughly man :D

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Brock,

Do a search for skeeter's post (around 400 of them) and read through them all. This guy knows balsa crankbaits, this will get you started in the right direction for bass lures.

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