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dvowell

Jann's lacquer paint

8 posts in this topic

dvowell    0

Greetings all,

After toiling around with soft plastics for a while now, I'm venturing out and trying my hand at hard baits. I have a question though (yes, I used the search, but didn't find an answer!).

I bought a set of paints from Jann's and they are supposedly lacquers. Well, I have lots of lacquer thinner already, but when I tried to thin the Jann's paint with it, it just gooped up, for lack of a better term. The Jann's thinner worked perfectly. This leads me to believe it is not really a lacquer?

If anyone out there is using something other than the Jann's lacquer thinner, could you let me know what it is? Thanks!

-D

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Skeeter    121

I would have to agree with you. I am definitely not the paint expert... but lacquer thinner regardless of the quality should not make lacquer paint goop up. I would contact them and ask them what type of lacquer it is. i.e. acrylic, urathane, etc. There are guys on this site that would be much better at answering this question than I am. Hopefully they will jump in here. But that is my 2 cents worth.

Skeeter

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dlaery    60

I am not an expert on paint. This is just my opinion.

I buy lacquer thinner for clean up. My paint thinner supplier says that I should not use that for thinning lacquer paint. This lacquer thinner I buy is the same stuff you buy at any hardware or WalMart. He (my paint thinner supplier) says that I need acrylic lacquer thinner for my lacquer paint. He also commented that there are different kinds of lacquer paint.

I never tired regular lacquer thinner for my paint.

I have been using acetone for my lacquer paint. It works ok but it really dries fast. That works good for me because I want to recoat as soon as I can. Also, I am painting leadheads through a small paint gun, not an air brush.

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cullin8s    0

the lacquer from janns is not the regular form of lacquer, it seems at least for some colors. Red is the worst, some of the paint seems normal others make the goop with lacquer thinner. I don't know what kind of lacquer they sell, but its not always compatible with lacquer thinner.

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Skeeter    121

dlaery,

It is my understanding that the regular type of lacquer thinner that most of us by from Wal Mart etc. is a real hodge podge of different types of thinners thrown together. It is not really a pure form of thinner. I have shot with it and it worked ok. However, there are more pure types of lacquer thinners. Professional paint shops should be able to help out and help someone select a good thinner for their paint. I use acetone like you do. However, if it is hot where you shoot it may be too "hot" of a thinner and dry before it hits the bait. This can cause a grainy texture to your lures. The reason that you need acrylic lacquer thinner is because you are shooting acrylic lacquer. The paint dude is right. There are different types of lacquers. I was told to use lacquer thinner to only clean with also. I had no problems using it to thin my paint. But that does not mean that someone else may not.

dvowell,

cullin8s does more painting than I do. He would be a better source for different types and brands of paints than I would. Personally, I would find a more consistant type of lacquer paint than Janns. Car paints are excellent but more expensive. I would get into that type of paint if you are going to use lacquer. When you get a good brand then stick with it and learn to use it. Jumping to all different kinds and brands of paints just confuses me. Keep records of how you thin your paints. The guy at the paint shop is an excellent source. He can definitely get you started correctly.

Skeeter

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dvowell    0

Thanks so much for all of your help guys...This side of things is all new to me, but the more I play with it, the more I find out how much I actually enjoy it. I'm on vacation this week and hope to get some serious lake time in, but there are also some storms predicted early this week...more time in the shop playing! :D

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Skeeter wrote It is my understanding that the regular type of lacquer thinner that most of us by from Wal Mart etc. is a real hodge podge of different types of thinners thrown together. It is not really a pure form of thinner. I have shot with it and it worked ok. However, there are more pure types of lacquer thinners. Professional paint shops should be able to help out and help someone select a good thinner for their paint. I use acetone like you do. However, if it is hot where you shoot it may be too "hot" of a thinner and dry before it hits the bait. This can cause a grainy texture to your lures. The reason that you need acrylic lacquer thinner is because you are shooting acrylic lacquer. The paint dude is right. There are different types of lacquers. I was told to use lacquer thinner to only clean with also. I had no problems using it to thin my paint. But that does not mean that someone else may not.

Dead on the money Skeeter!

dvowell,I am not familiar with Jann's Acrylic Lacquer but I would just about bet you that if you would go to the AUTO PAINT (not yelling) shop and buy some PRIMER GRADE LACQUER THINNER (not yelling )your problems would be solved.The stuff you buy at walmart and hardeware stores has way to much oil and impurities in it.It is not much better than mineral spirits.One gallon of primer grade thinner will run you about 7 to 8 bucks.Good luck B&B

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