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finlander

thru hole diameter

14 posts in this topic

What size drill bit do you use when trying to put a thru-wire thru a bait? Is too large a hole bad for the balance, too much epoxy to fill the gaps? :rolleyes:

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I split my baits when using through wire construction so I can put in the line tie and both hangers as a single wire unit. Glue up the halves with 5 min epoxy. With hand tools, or even with a drill press, I can't conceive I'd be accurate enough to hit the nose from the tail, or vice versa. However, to answer your question, I'd use a bit that's only slightly larger diameter than your wire. You aren't going to get 100% glue coverage in a long hole unless you have a way to pump epoxy from one end to the other. I don't know a practical way to do that. IMO, the smaller the better.

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You guys are one step ahead of me. My next question was to be how many large lure makers split the lure in half. A small lure, 8", I am finishing now has a slot cut with my rotary tool and a h.d. cutoff wheel. I am finding out now that a few big lure mfgrs do split theirs and glue after the wire installation. Some split theirs horizontally too. Thanks.

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I use a 1/8 hole because that size drill bit is readily in available brad point and long shaft bits. Brad point bits make drilling a straight hole much easier.

I seal the hole when I seal the bait. I use thinned Etex to seal so the added weight is minimal and I can pour it down the hole.

I use a nose and tail grommets so there is virtually no gap to seal. Once the wire is in place I use Devcon to secure the grommets, cover the wrapped area of the wire and seal the small gap between the wire and the grommet. Everything is then top coated with multiple coats of Etex.

At this point I feel the gaps sealed and balance is actually better than using the screw eyes. Even with the grommets, this system is stronger and lighter than screw eyes and since the weight is linear through the center of the bait I feel balance is better.

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I work with smaller lures! Made some larger ones, but not larger than 4". I When i use thru-wire i usually use 2 pieces of wood that i glue together, so they are as symmetrical as possible. At first i cut the profile, then glue them together with some hobby glue. I get the final shape, and split them again, where they were glued together, and make the thru-wire structure. That is if I'm using thru wire. If not and if i'm making flat baits i use a small drill, get the holes done, and make some hangers just like in the hanger topic, and just epoxy them in.

I believe that drilling an entire bait for it to have thru wire is totally unnecessary. It ads weight to the bait! And it's hard(at least that's what i believe) to poor the epoxy the way you want.

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I work with smaller lures! .

I use this technque for baits as small as 2 inches. Almost all my baits are 4" or less.

I believe that drilling an entire bait for it to have thru wire is totally unnecessary.

Probably' date=' I tend to over engineer my baits. I personally think wire thru is easier and requires less parts inventory.

It ads weight to the bait!

Actually no, a thru wire and two grommets weigh less than the three eye screws and two disk washers I used to use. I use a barrel swivel for the belly hook, but that allows me to reduce my ballast weight. If I want a very light bait I just twist a double loop from a piece of the thru wire and ust that in the belly.

And it's hard(at least that's what i believe) to poor the epoxy the way you want.

There are lots of ways to thin Etex and get it through an 1/8 hole. A pipe cleaner makes easy work of ensuring an even coat and cleaning out the excess.

It's really a matter of personal preference and matching a technique to the desired outcome.

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I was reading just the other day about a guy that drills by hand a hole from one end of the bait to the other...no kidding. They said he simply looks down the bait and starts drilling. I like the idea of glueing the bait together, shaping it, and then splitting, great idea! Think I will stick with screw eyes, too much work, lol.

jed

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I Tried to through hole drill a number of lure blanks and failed badly, An 1/8 drill going through 9 inches of hard wood just is not practical unless you are going to turn the bait using the holes as centers, I tend to cut blank blocks of wood and then draw the pattern on one side, decide where the front eye and the tail eye will be and mark themThen i clamp the lure blank to a squared block and use the table saw to cut a groove to the right depth, my saw cuts a slot of approx .130 of an inch, then I continue with the band saw to cut the blank to shape, I also cut all scrap pieces of wood with the table saw to 1/8 (.125) .When the lure is nearing completion I make the wire spine & hangers all in one piece insert with epoxy into the slot and then before the epoxy sets epoxy in the 1/8 strips so they sit proud of the finished shape when all is set remove the excess wood and the job is complete (during this process I also install most of the weight required)

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It's easyer to shape the lure without having the thru-wire insertion in it. After shaping it, the rest it's a piece of kake. I use a five min epoxy do glue it together, and i'm sure it'll never fail.

Don't think thi proces is recomended for a balsa bait, because you will distriy the lure when you'll whant to split it, where it was glued, because of the softness of the wood. Didn't try this stuff yet, so i can't be certain. Folk just sent me some, and i'm waiting for it to arrive.

I will deffenetly stick to this metod of thru wireing. It's as easy as that. I kind of faild with my first large jointed by using screw eyes! It has a leak somewhere, because when i first started fishing it it was a floating device :wink: , but after about 2 hours it started sinking, so the device :censored: started filling up with water. I guess i'll have to let it dry for about 2 months or so, beore making something about it.

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After my failed first attempt, I cut a slot in the belly, and ran a wire thru the lip to the tail, with two hangers made separately. I had tried drilling from both ends, on a 12 inch body. Missed by 3/16 or so. 2nd try came out better as I was able to run a wire completely thru with some difficulty. I first cut a slot with my rotary tool, then tried to widen it with a heavy cutoff wheel on my hand drill. Then went to sand paper, and finally pushed the wire in the slot by hand and with help of a needle nose. I do not own a table saw. I have a band saw, router, compound miter saw. I think I tried cutting a slot with a hand saw a year or so ago, but it strayed alot. Another tool I have looked at is a narow belt sander. Anyone use one? Will the belt give abit as you push the lure body against it, or is it rigid? Thanks for the help guys. I seem to get into these lure making phases before I go to Ontario to fish for muskies. I'll post pictures as soon as I learn how. :(

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The way a lot of saltwater plugs are done is to drill a 1/8 inch hole from the nose to the tail. This can be done on the lathe after the plug is turned. Drill part way from one end, then the other. Use a longer bit in a hand drill to finish the hole. A hole is then drilled in the belly to intersect the thru-hole and a swivel is used as the hook hanger for the belly hook. The hole is left open. Prior to priming the plug is dipped in a boiled linseed oil/mineral spirits mix and left to dry for several days. Prime, paint and clear coat as usual. Once you get it down it can be done real quick and you have very few misses.

Andrew

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Bought a set of brad tip drill bits. From 1/2 down to 1/8". They're about 11 3/4" long. I still have to drill from both ends. I drilled a 1/2" belly hole about halfway down the bait. The holes that came from the ends did not meet. They were on oppasite sides of the 1/2" belly hole. I'm drilling thru cedar, with a hand drill. Am I still at the mercy of the wood grain? I even tried using a 3/8" bit from the tail, figuring it would use the existing hole as a guide. Nope. It went off on its' own, ending up ABOVE the 1/2" belly hole. Any suggestions before the drill bits go to EBAY and I finally go to slot cutting as the last method I will use? :rolleyes:

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Finlander;

I have not tried to drill through a 12" bait, but I can still offer some tips.

First, brad point tips are the way to go.

Second, it is much easier with a drill press. I draw lines on the top and side of the bait that correspond with the hole I want to drill. I then put the lure in a drill press vise and adjust its position until both the lines are perfectly vertical, that way I know the bit will follow the path I have planned.

Third, a faster turning drill bit tends to track straighter.

I think if you had a drill press with at least 6" of travel you would have no problem.

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