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LaPala

Not all Colors are created equal

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I have bee lookin thru a DuPont Mastertint System paint mixing manual for auto paint, from the information of the base colors(tints) used to create all the other color here's an example of what I found out (from the manual descriptions):

Color Red

AM55 (Light Red): transperant red tint, saturated yellow tone at all angles.

AM58 (Deep Maroon): Equal to AM55 but redder, bluer, dirtier

AM62 (Transperant Red): Clean blue toned red

AM64 (Magenta): Blue toned red, transparent tint, more saturated & more transperant than AM66 the most reddish red tint at side on angle

AM66 (Red Violet): The most desaturated blue toned red

There are like 100s more including metalics & pearls, not to mention u mix these mastertints to create other colors inbetween. But in a nut shell, red is not red and so it goes for other colors. Blue can have greenish or yellow tint, etc etc.... The effect of these colors are not the same when viewed at different angles relative to the light source direction & viewing angle.

Perhaps something for u guys to ponder when getting ur next paint :D Would the fish like a blue with green undertone or a yellow undertone?? or If my black really is black afterall, Dang this is confusing LOL.

NOT ALL COLORS ARE CREATED EQUAL it all depends on the manufacturers and what type of based it's mixed(created from), I think this is part of the reason why some similiar color schemes with one catching fish & other not as productive -- different paints!!.

PS: I for one will want a AM8 Graphite black for my black from now on ---- Transparent Black, gives a satiny yellow-red appearance in head on and side on angle. Or I'm gonna get that auto paint guy to create me a black with red tint and blue undertone B)

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Again, a good post LP. When looking for paint I have noticed the same thing about colors. Some manufacturers will detail the head-on and undertone colors pretty good while others never mention it. You can actually creat the effect by using transparent paints. Some blues over yellow will give a blue look head-on but show blueish/green from the sides. By playing around with colors, you can create effects by using a different base coats. One example is transparent orange. Over white it is orange while over grey it looks like a dirty orange and will change colors depending on angle.

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I cannot answer for all fisherman or all species of fish, but I can say that from my rather lengthy experience with musky fishing, color is VERY big deal.

I know of a few colors that I'm pretty sure make them hurl. :D They despise red in my area at least, and I'm pretty sure I've heard them laugh out loud at gray.

That said, when the wood dust settles and the overspray clears, I find that I still paint what feels good for me.

Muskys suck anyway. :P

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SpoRoller: U're embarassing me with ur compliment :oops: I'm sure u guys are more knowledgeble in this area than I am. I'm just sharing some tid-bits I found out.

Since then I've been talking (bugging actually :D) a local artist who mixes his own colors and boy it's like taking a degree course again. Color Theory, product knowledge... damn I wish I was ignorant & can just pick up a spray can labelled red & spray my red throat. Now that I know, well it just opened up another Pandora's Box on colors for me.

Fatfingers: Love what u did with the plastic lure & the paint color. Any theory behind your copper orange combination?? Orange is a killer color for a few species over here as well. But now I know there's more than just plain orange that's the trigger.

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Lapala, yes, I guess you could say I have a theory or idea about the copper/orange color combination.

My fishing partner and I have had outstanding results with muskies when using a color called orange tiger in the 6 inch floating grandma bait. We've raised and caught fish on that lure in the color at times when nothing else worked and a few of the fish were giants, one was a 50+ inch fish. About two weeks ago, I picked up that particular grandma and whipped it out about 25 yards, twitched it twice and a 43 incher about removed my favorite rod/reel combination from my hands.

So I have, for quite some time, tried to duplicate and modify that color and pattern in other baits styles.

I also had an bait called an Eddie glider in a similar color that also produced when other baits produced only follows or no results at all.

The Eddie was more of a copper colored bait and on three occasions I connected when I threw the bait as a last resort (because it was rather ugly in fact).

The copper pearl is a color my brother turned me on to and I've used only over a black base coat so far. It is very subtle and requires about 20 to 30 coats to get the effect that I'm trying to achieve. It is a fun color to use and it is pleasing because it changes hues in direct sunlight.

The problem with musky fishing is that the species often feeds in spurts; you may at times get only a 45 minute window each day when muskies are truly actively feeding and even then you have to be at the right place and quickly try a variety of baits to see what is working and what is not. So, trying a new color pattern becomes a function of luck and intuition and luck with copius quantities of good fortune thrown in for good measure. :wink: But that is all part of the fun/twisted sick futility/addiction of musky fishing I guess.

I am trying to come up with a color scheme that fades the copper into a burnt orange and then into a brilliant pearl orange, then yellow which fades into a white pearl belly. The mind can imagine it if the well-worn fingers of mine could only execute more efficiently. :D

Here's a cigar style glider that was yet another attempt at the same...

OTcropped2resized.jpg

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Thanks for sharing that info fatfingers.

This makes somethings connect for me. Been a while since I've settle down to the Rapala ShadRap Crawdad (CW) & Goldfish (GF) color pattern as most productive for Jungle Perch. Incidentally, CW is an orangish brown & GF is bright gold based fluro orange..... I might try ur formula & combine the two :D Maybe then I don't have to decide each time which lure to throw first then B)

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