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landor

Using jewelers wax

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Artbrush, you wrote a reply about 1 or 2 years ago detailing how to make a 4-part mold and using jewelers wax to make the master, key sets and carving each half so that you end up with 2 empty shells. I have some green jewelers wax (Ferris File-A-Wax) it doesn?t carve very well with a carving knife (a lot of chipping), using carving chisels and small gouges does a lot better as well as using a burning pen with the heat turned way down, and heating small spatulas with an alcohol lamp, a Dremel tool also works. Basically what I am doing is making molds from Durhams Water Putty using generic body shapes carved from wood. Then casting the jewelers wax to become my master blank, pouring several wax blanks and using these wax blanks to experiment with by carving different details in them before deciding on which one or ones to make a mold of using Mold Max 30. As much as a round about way of doing this seems, my reasoning is that it is easier to repair a mistake in wax than in wood, plus the wax can be melted back down and used again. It also eliminates having to cut out wood blanks because of carving mistakes, my carving skills are not all that good.

1. Do any of the other waxes (Ferris Fil-A-Wax Purple or Blue) carve any better with a carving knife? Or what would you recommend?

2. Have you used Alumilite Clear to pressure cast clear bodies or Smooth-on Crystal Clear 202? Any recommendations?

3. Which Smooth-Cast series would you recommend or would one of the Smooth-on Task series be better?

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Bob

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Hey Bob,

1. Do any of the other waxes (Ferris Fil-A-Wax Purple or Blue) carve any better with a carving knife? Or what would you recommend?

The waxes come in 3 hardnesses green (hardest) blue (mid-grade) & purple (soft). The blue is supposed to be more user friendly as it will hold good detail and won't snap as easily as the green. I've not worked with any of the waxes yet, but I've got some purple to try. A jeweler recommened it as it's more carvable and won't chip... it's kinda plyable so it's less apt to snap. Make curved rake tools and spatulas to get the bulk down quick then the wax can be smoothed with a little heat.

2. Have you used Alumilite Clear to pressure cast clear bodies or Smooth-on Crystal Clear 202? Any recommendations?

I've not done any pressure casting or used alumilite products. I've tested crystal clear 202 for diving bills and lure halves with good results. Pressure casting was lacking but the parts were tuff. Parts must be baked in the oven to full cure. A gloss finish on the model will help reduce the need to polish the finished parts. The guys at smooth-on tell me task is even tougher if ya don't mind light amber tint.

3. Which Smooth-Cast series would you recommend or would one of the Smooth-on Task series be better?

Works got me busy as heck so I haven't been able to put much time into the 4 part lure molds. (Currently working 2 part / featherlite) For 4 part molds I'm using Smoothcast 300 for lure halves with the diving bills in crystal clear. Lures with the diving bill attached to the lure half can be done in crystal clear or task for transparent lures. Both are good products.

Gotta perfect a few tweeks b4 a tutorial can come together.

Post pics of your work bud!

Tight Lines,

Shawn

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