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Paul Keltner

cleaning your air brush

7 posts in this topic

I was just wondering how some of you guys clean up your air brush, I have been having some problems that I think might be coming from me not cleaning the brush right. I have a badger 150 that tends to spit a lot and sometimes blobs the paint out :censored: . I am using AutoAir with the same pressure that I have been using in the past with no problem. Anyway can't say I have ever seen this topic thought it would be interesting to see what others did.

thanks,

Paul

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I find the same thing with Paasche. From my experience brushes are alot like women, you just never know what the next minute will bring! My brush will work perfectly one night and the next I fight it for two hours. The brush looks exactly the same near as I can tell, the tip is clearn, and I am using the same paint...go figure. It would really be fun to work with someone that airbrushes for a living and see just exactly how they keep the brush working perfectly nearly all the time. I still think much of the inconsistencies we experience are a result of the paints.

Jed V.

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Paul...There are alot of guys on here that can probably answer your question better than I but, I will tell you what I do. Also, there have been some excellent posts regarding airbrush cleaning. First of all, I use waterbased paint and I have found that if I flush my airbrush when I'm finished with Windex, it eliminates about 90% of my problems. If I experience problems while I'm painting...I just put my bottle of windex on....backflush and spray it about 10 seconds...put my paint back on and keep painting. Also, I think I remember reading that you should not soak your airbrush. I used to be guilty of that but, since I've started using Windex, I haven't had any problems. Hope this helps!

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Paul,

I use a badger for my fish and bird carving almost exclusively. I, too, use Windex (with ammonia) while painting and after form cleaning. Also after each project I soak the metal pieces in lacquer thinner for 30 - 40 minutes before I put it back together. I use the 150 and a couple 100's. A good supply of pipe cleaners and Q-tips is also good to have handy.

Carver Guy

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One other question for you Paul. What type of air compressor are you using? Is it an oil-lube or oil-free type? If it's an oil-lubed compressor, oil might be carrying over and slugging your airbrush. Change the filter element on your filter/regulator. You can also buy a desiccant snake air dryer by DeVilbiss through Eastwood Co. for $20. You'll really want to put it in-line after a filter, but before a regulator/filter because they have a high pressure drop so you feed it 90psi, then use the second regulator to drop the pressure down to 35-50psi (or whatever your paint recommends). The desiccant snake will definitely improve your air going through your airbrush.

I have a large 60gallon 3HP oil-lubed setup for my garage. After my tank I have a course (50 micron) filter, then I have a 10 micron filter/regulator and a quick connect fitting. When I run my airbrush, I have a quick-connect fitting on the end of the desiccant snake and the other end is fitted to a moisture indicator and another mini filter/regulator that feeds my airbrush. This way I'm only drying the air to my airbrush and I can still use my compressor for other tools without burning through the desiccant snake.

Of course, all of the air prep is worthless if you don't keep the airbrush clean...

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Throughly flush the brush after using, then take it apart to clean the insides. I use a set of airbrush cleaning brushes to get all of the crap out of the brush after each cleaning session. Also inspect the needle and other small parts. A tiny dent or ding can create problems.

Andrew

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Also, I was reading an article in "Air Brush Action" and in one of the How-To articles, the author mentioned that paint that was too thick will cause sputtering and splattering, so he said to make sure to use well thinned paint and several coats.

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