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Illini Nate

Glider Frustration

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Well after more failed attempts than I can count I was hoping someone might be able to help me out getting gliders to run correctly. I'm hoping to get something similar to a magic maker type action. I think my problem is the weight placement in the baits. If anyone has any suggestions I'm all ears.

Nate

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If you could give some basic information like...type of wood, size/shape of glider, approximately where weight placement is...this would help.

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ha ha i suppose that would help. I am trying to get a shad/panfish type profile that will swing like a magic maker. I have been trying to add weight to both ends of the bait, and also to the center, but a lot of the time my baits are rolling completely over. If anyone has any tips ill be very appreciative.

Nate

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I am having issues also. I made a 6 in glider out of Red Oak. Weighted it with 2 ,1/4 oz weight s the front (between pull eye and hook) also put 2 inbetween rear and middle hook. The front 2 are sitting on top of each other. The back two are side by side. All it does in the water is lift straight up then sink back down. No side to side at all. I put the pull eye even with the point on the nose.I was going to try and move the pull eye down a little see if that helped? Seems to be alot of weight was required to get it to sink. My buddy Jeremy made 1 a little different with about the same weight set up differnt body style and it glides side to side nice? Does body design have that much say in how it glides?

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When I first started making baits I had a hard time figuring out how to weight a glide bait very similar to the Magic Maker. I had just cut out a piece of wood attached hooks and played around with weight placement with no luck, the bait would almost pull straight ahead with maybe a little lift. So I went back home thinking the same thing that it had to be weight placement. I looked at some purchased baits and could tell where they added the weight because they did not do a good job of sanding down the filler after they melted in the lead. The placement of the lead was almost identical to where I had placed mine and the bait weighed the same. I went back out to the garage fired up the router and put a radius on the edges of the bait. I went back out to a local park with everybody starring at me, cause I was throwing a chunk of wood bigger than any fish (Bluegill) in the pond. It glided perfectly after I put a radius on the edges. Conclusion, to some degree shape has a lot to do with the action of the bait. I believe the more you put the weight towards the center of gravity the more the bait will turn, but in my experience you can get it to turn to much to where it will turn 180 degrees on itself and will get caught on leaders and your line. Also I try to keep the weight as close to the belly as I can. Maybe you did the same thing and this helps. If not maybe a picture of your work would help others in determining the problems with your baits. I have not made baits out of oak (open grain looked to be a problem with sealing and painting) only poplar and maple so there are always going to be differences in weighting based on densities of the wood or other material being used. Hope this helps.

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