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this is my first crankbait.is their any way to fix it?

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i didn't weight it.but added all the hardware and hooks.then put it in water and it sank tail first.its made from poplar.about 2.5" long 3/8ths wide.i was thinking of adding something buoyant behind the hook.what do you think?it sank pretty fast.you can click on the picture.thanks :cry:th_1020.jpg

th_1018.jpg

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Never used poplar so haven't had the problem but if you want to lighten the rear of the bait, I'd consider drilling out an air cavity in the top back. When the lure is undercoated and waterproof, stick some tape over the hole and test float the lure with the treble hooks installed, enlarging the hole until you get the float you want. Superglue or epoxy a piece of aluminum from a soda can over the hole to seal it. You can sand the aluminum down to blend it into the body. Remember, your finish and epoxy clearcoat will add a little weight too (maybe .03-.04 oz). If you want to get frisky, you might add a glass bead to the chamber for a rattle, but beware of adding weight high in the bait or it may fall over at rest :)

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The lure sank because it soaked up water. It doesn't take long for the lure to become water logged. I would forget that lure and get some balsa. You can make lures out of hardwood, but you will experience alot of what you are going through now. Balsa is forgiving when you weight it, and you will have to weight it some. You can shape balsa quickly so when you make mistakes you can make another one and keep trying untill you get it right. You can seal a bare balsa bait with a clearcoat and test the bait. If it works then you can paint over the clearcoat and clearcoat the lure again and then you are ready to fish it.

Skeeter

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I don't understand why it sank. I have used poplar alot and it shouldn't have sank, even with a whole bunch of water in it, strange. Take skeeters advice and work with some balsa. If you can't get your hands on balsa you might try western red cedar (not eastern) which has a specific gravity similar to balsa. Pine would probably work also, it's very light and soft..try balsa first. Don't feel bad about having to toss one, if you stay with this hobby you will toss dozens. Each one you make it gets easier and you will get better, chalk it up to experience.

jed v.

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Balsa is perfect for someone just beginning, easy to carve, weight and finish, an makes one heck of a crankbait. Check around a local hobby shop to get ahold of some, usually if they don't stock it they can order for you. the hardwoods are alright, they are very durable and hold up to wood screws but can make you loose your religion when trying to get them weighted properly when you are learning.

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I'll send you mail but the bases of the answer is in the sise VS the type of hardwood. It sunk tail first due to the hardware VS amount of hardwood in the rear. I'll calculate it and give you a answer that will be on the money! Thanks for posting the picture -I see the problem already!

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