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Mallard

Has anyone used Minwax wood hardener

18 posts in this topic

http://www.minwax.com/products/woodmaint/hardener.cfm

I bought some of this to repair some decaying wood in a door jam. Apply it to the weakened area, repair with putty, seal with BIN primer/sealer and paint, worked great.

Since it claims to seal and harden soften wood I though I would try using it to seal some plugs. I am using WRC, I dip the plugs in the solution and leave submerged for about 30 seconds, let dry for 5 minutes and repeat. 2 or 3 coats seem to do the trick. I then sand and dip in BIN oil based sealer. The BIN appears to adhere just fine.

Only draw back has been the wood hardener causes the soft part of the wood to contract making the grain more visible. I have been compensating with extra coats of BIN.

Anyone else try this product? What are the chances of the primer separating from the sealer? I think BIN would stick to a greasy skillet but I not sure if time and temperature changes might cause air bubbles.

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Mallard,

As a side note and not really a response to your question....the WRC has a terrible tendency to show grain whenever you put something wet on it. All woods do this to some degree but WRC seems to be one of the worst. I do like this wood because it's nice for shaping and provides a very lively action but for the most part I try not to use it for the above stated reasons.

Jed V.

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I have heard of structural epoxy that in effect does the same as the product you mentioned. I believe it is a 2-part system. It would seem to be just the ticket for bait builders.

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I normally use Etex thinned with lacquer thinner. I brush it on, let it absorb into the wood then wipe off the excess. It does not enhance the grain pattern, it actually fills it in a little bit. The wood hardener is much easier since you just dip it couple of times, I am just afraid it may come back and bite me in a few months.

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Have you guys ever tried raising the grain. I have done this on finishing some furniture but it was made of oak and being stained. The process is pretty simple you just take a damp cloth and moisten the wood, let it dry and then lightly sand the grain down with 220 grit. The moisture is what raises the grain up some from the surface of the wood. Make sure you only sand the raised grain down (don't get to aggressive sanding). I have never dealt with the Western Red Cedar but assume that doing this may produce similar results.

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Minwax actually suggests that approach on their web site. The problem with western red cedar is not so much a raised grain like basswood or oak but that the veins are made of much harder cells the matter between them. One of the things I had to learn is the more you sand WRC the worst it gets. A quick sanding with 100 or 150 grit and you're done. It can be quite tricky to work with, but once you get the techniques down the action it gives a bait makes it worthwhile.

I do think the grain issue will make the Wood Hardener and WRC a poor mix, but see promise with other woods. I may look into the structural epoxy KcDano mentioned.

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Mallard you right on.

Almost all coniferous (AKA soft) woods have extremely soft summer wood and much harder spring/fall wood. When you sand these woods it is very easy to sand the soft areas away leaving the hard ares creating the felling of raised grain. Coincidentally there are a lot of "soft" woods are harder than a lot of deciduous or hard woods

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I tried the Minwax Wood Hardener last fall with some mixed results on balsa baits. The problem I ran into was with my epoxy sealer not adhering to the balsa if it had been treated with the MWH. It certainly makes for a nice base for the epoxy but had quite a few baits that the sealing coat of the epoxy seperated from the bait after heating up in the sun on the deck of the boat! I reverted back to the old way of thinning down some epoxy with MEK and rubbing it on with a clean rag. No compatability issues doing this.

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Cheesehead,

Good point, WRC is a soft wood, but it is harder than Balsa that is technically a hard word since it is deciduous. Did I get that right?

Blackjack,

What is MEK? I have been thinning Etex with Lacquer Thinner that specifics it will thin epoxies, I got it at Ace. Should I look for MEK?

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why doesnt anyone use lacquer sanding sealer. its great seals and doent raise the grain. a quik scuff and your ready to prime

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I have had alot of experience using the structural epoxy mentioned above. I would not recommend this stuff for several reasons. 1.) expense- this stuff can cost upwards of 100 dollars a gallon. 2.) odor- it is very smelly, and in enclosed spaces can make you ill, some people develop allergic reactions to it over time. 3.) This stuff is made to bond concrete together. It does not dry clear, or very hard, as it is made to be semi-elastic.

You can try this stuff if you want, but do it in a very well ventilated area, be carefull how you mix it (gets very hot) and good luck!

By the way, I used this type of epoxy in an industrial setting, for it's intended purpose of structural repair.

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When I was looking for a good sealer I actually talked to a Minwax chemist about using that product like we do. He couldn't recommend it for lures. He couldn't guaranty that it would hold up to that kind of possible moisture exposure. I have been using thinned Flexcoat for six or seven years without a problem.

I loved the comment about BIN sticking to a greasy fry pan. Very funny. You are right. BIN and Coverstain. Great stuff!

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kzimmerman,

The product you speak of isn't the same!! This epoxy is used extensively in wood boat restoration. Claiming that if properly applied the repair area will be stronger than the original wood.

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