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fisheye56

Where to start?

7 posts in this topic

For a year I have been watching all of the people on this site. Getting ideas tips etc. I have been hand carving wood baits for a year. I think I'm ready for a air brush. All my baits to date have been sprayed with can type paints.Can a air brush be had cheep and still do all that I need. I watched a guy at wallmart in a booth paint signs it blew me away the details so easy all my details are so time consuming because I think because of the way I'm painting. The other problem I'm having is with the connection thru my lexan bils never clean pro looking like the ones I see on your photos. Thanks for any help you can give.

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You can usually pick up an airbrush in a kit with everything that you need for around $50 - $60 bucks. Believe me, it will take alittle time to learn to shoot. But it is definitely easier than a can. I would imagine that the guy at wal mart has been doing it awhile. And don't forget the the piece that you are shooting is much smaller. I assume that the lip problem you are talking about is in getting the wire through the lip. Search the web for micro drill bits and get one the diameter of the wire that you are using.

Skeeter

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Get ready for a little expense.I dont really know what your costs are like in GA.but to disagree with Skeete on an airbrush I would et the best one you can afford,I think its just like buying trucks,boats,fishin equipment...You seem to find something better once you purchase yours.You can get a pretty decent one around here for about 140.Now ou need a compressor.I dont especially are for the small ones set up for airbrushing,yes they are quiet and dont take up much space but they runn alot more and most I've seen just dont do a good enough job for the task at hand. As for paints seeing that you've read a lot of posts on here Auto Air seems to be the paint of choice, at around 5 bucks a 4oz.bottle it doesnt take long to rack up a few bucks.Clear coat is a matter of preference.Seems like from what I've seen Etex (environmental lite) or Devcon would be the go to.I use a product very similar to Etex and am getting ready to try some.Before I pass it up a lot of people use sealers,and or primers.Check on Tutorials for anything you're in doubt of.Yes this is a great site and I've learned a bunch since finding it.Everyone has always been very helpful,and more so willing to give input.I'm sure youll get plenty more response and you're lucky to have this site as I did not when I started.I might as well thow all my stuff away and start over.There are some great ideas on here.

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Even before the purchasing an airbrush, I'd recommend buying some info on beginning airbrushing, something like Barron's Art Guide- Learning to Paint or even get a copy of Air Brush- Action Magazine. In the rear of their mag, they have a Buyer's Guides that offers specs for airbrushes and comparisons on features.

Once you get a grasp of what you'll need to begin, have BearAir send you a copy of The AirBrush Bible (www.BearAir.com). You can do some price shopping at that point.

Other than that, I wouldnt suggest rushing out and buying the first cheap brush and compressor you come across...I would shoot for a setup in the middle of the road, not too cheap not too expensive.

Best of luck and let us see your work once you get rolling.

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Drilling lips - one thing that works well is a Dremel tool. Take a short piece of the same wire that you're using for the line tie and use it as a drill bit in the Dremel. Run at 15000 or 3000 rpm, the wire will neatly drill/melt through the lip and you'll have the exact diameter you need. I do this with both stainless and .040" brass wire.

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I've looked at a lot of sites and catalogs. www.dixieart.com seems to be the best to me. As far as research, there are a lot of art sites that offer good help. The one I use most is Wet Canvas. hope this helps.

Carver Guy

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I think we all start with aerosol cans, then graduate to the airbrush.My advice...research first, as there are plenty of options. Purchase some training aids, to get a better "feel" for some of the different methods...then decide what type would suit your needs best.

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