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bladesandbaits

Sunny Side Up

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I posted a pic in the lure gallery and hit the submit button before I was finished typng LOL.Maybe the pic will show up in a couple days.

Here is the "code of the west"on this one if anyone is interested.

Note 1: This pattern was originally done on a rogue for a guy in Tenn.

The violet "flops" under the pearl when fished shallow like a a rogue runs.The yellow pearl really gives alot of flash of when the bait rolls.

A shallow jerk bait in this pattern is super deadly on smallmouth and spotted bass.

I really did not see the reason to paint the pattern on a crankbait that runs 10 feet but the one in the gallery was for a customer.and the customer is always right! :D

Note 2:All of this is in Lacquer.

Colors Needed:

White

Pearl White

Chartruese

Yellow

Yellow Pearl

Black

Violet Pearl

Luremaster Strike Orange

Red

Instructions: (in this order)

White all

Pearl All

Yellow from belly turn- to shoulder turn (heavy)leave belly middle and back middle unpainted

Chartruese belly blend to yellow

Yellow pearl all

black back fade to sides

Violet pearl over black

strike orange cheeks

Net - pearl white scales

Remove net- pearl white down back carefully blend to top of net line

Note: be sure not to get too happy with the pearl white,if you get the pearl white to heavy the vioet pearl will not "flop" under the pearl white .

After all is dry good stencil black the marks

Red accents

Blades

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It appears that the "black back fade to sides" is done very softly, that is, it appears tha very little black is applied and that the violet pearl over black" sort of fades and tones down the black quite a bit?

Am I right or on track?

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http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b258/bladesandbaits/goodssup.jpg

You are correct fatfingers.Make the middle of the back dark and just fade it down the side.I use a lot of retarder to cut down on the overspray.I usually have to make 4 or 5 shots with black because i retard it so much.The first shot looks very transparent. Just make sure you let it flash dry a bit before adding another layer.

On this one i was jacking around with some different mesh I had around the shop.If you just lightly shoot the pearl scales on,then they will dissapear at certain angles and just the faded violet shows.

When you fish this rogue in clear water,and are able to look at the bait when twiched or jerked,the pearl over the violet does some funky stuff when the bait rolls and the light reflects from it.

I started doing this pattern on Lucky craft Stacy's and Pointer minnows.The guy's that used this one on those baits say they have called some smallies up from some pretty deep water.I believe the flash this thing gives off from the pearl over the violet is what draws there attention.

Yell if you need more.

B&B

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Scoop,a little of both.I may not explain this right but retarder can be considered a type of thinner.I really cant speak for water base paint as to what retards the drying process.

In respect to acrylic lacquer I use PPG lacquer retarder.In this case I cut the paint with about the same amount retarder as I do primer grade thinner.(keep in mind I am using a 2 oz siphon jar)

The best way to explain how much retarder to start with is to already have the paint thinned to the consistancy You want to shoot.Then add a little retarder and do a test shot.

You are actually thinning the paint more when you do this.I guess I am kind of like a "jackleg" chemist. I always have a bottle of retarder handy any time I am painting.I add a little here and there just by feel and experience.

lacquer starts to dry the instant it leaves the gun! If you use a "fast thinner" then it is very fast to start drying.Depending on the humidity,you get some very dull effects and a hell of alot of overspray.

Retarder sort of "lubricates" the paint and gives it an oily appearence when it is sprayed on.

When you are able to control the the drying you can control overspray.Of course it is important to have the paint thinned properly and get the technique of aiming the gun and rolling the bait in order to aid in controlling overspray.

There is a product called (Zylene SP) or (xylene SP) that can be used as a retarder.I believe it is available at lowes or home depot now.I used it for years and it works especially well on Luremaster chartruese and all the colors like strike green and orange.

If you use water base paint I am sure there is a way to retard it as well.I am sure there are others here that would share this information.Sorry to ratttle on here but hope this answered the question.

If not pm me I can go into more detail.

Fatfingers,thank you.This is why I love painting.The possibilities are endless.Believe me for every one that you come up with that works,there are a ton of them that would make you puke to look at LOL.

Thanks,B&B

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