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lucky_fisherman

trying to get started

9 posts in this topic

I was turned on to the idea of making lures by my friend. Since then I have been spending every free second I have had reading posts and tutorials on this site. Ive even began making a muskie size glide bait (I'm modeling it after a Hellhound). Anyway my question is what type of knife would you recommend for someone just starting out? I'm a college student so i don't have a whole lot of cash to throw around but I am really excited to make my own lures. So far I have been using a jackknife and it is a real pain. Thanks in advance for any help.

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Fishbooger is right. The Murphy knife is probably the best carving knife that you can get for the money. If you buy it from Smoky Mountain Woodcarvers, ask them to hone the edge for you. I think that they will do it either at no charge or for a very nominal charge. Also, plan on ordering a strop and some compound to keep the edge on the knife. Mac Profitt and Gene Webb will take good care of you. I've done a fair amount of business with them over the years and they will go out of their way to help you.

Gene

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Man I can remember those days! I can remember making 3 trips down to the hardward store to look at a small can of shellac that I wanted to finish a lure but didn't have the three bucks to pay for it......no kidding!!!! I think I would buy a coping saw (10 bucks or less) and a flat file (5 bucks or less) and some coarse sand paper, about 3 bucks....and "go to work baby". Next buy yourself a piece of 3/4" maple, cedar or basswood...pine will work too. If you go to the lumber yard they will often have a "junk pile" you can dig through for free. Lay your stencil on the board, trace around it. Now cut out the shape with the coping saw, take your time. Now round the edges over using the flat file and then go to the sand paper. I bet you could have ten bodies ready in a couple hours. More than anything, take your time and have fun. It is better to finish one lure you are happy with than 3 that are a disappointment.

Send me your address and I will mail you out a few bodies.

jed v.

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It all depends on WHAT type of lures you are making. I unfortunately have not used a knife at all. In that case for the lures Im making, I have to agree with Riverman on this one. Especially since your just starting out. I bought a Table Top Scroll saw to cut the shape out for under $100.00. A coping saw will do just fine for starting out though. Just take your time. Then as he stated, a File, I use a Rasp that is Coarse on one side and Medium on the other. It has a Flat side and a Rounded shape for both the Coarse and Medium and I believe it was under $5.00. If you are going to use the harder woods, I would suggest that over a knife. The rasp really does you good. Then sand it down from coarse to fine, and you are good to go!

For starting out, I used Balsa wood. For like $3.00 at the craft store I can buy enough balsa to make at least 20 baits. I also have used Poplar and Pine. A little tuffer wood material, but it is very manageable!

Cody

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But I also have to mention, when I first started out, I must have made 100 dissappointments until I came up with one that is worthy! :D But I certainoly enjoyed the process AND learnt! Cody

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Read, read, read, before you spend. It will make your dollars go much farther.

The guys on this site are really great about sharing ideas and methods, tips on tools, paints, you name it.

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I am also going to try a few bodies this winter but didn't know where to start. I have a bunch of Red Oak and Hickory, but I assume it is way to hard.

I already have the air brush and oil based primer. I also have some different files but I do not have a rasp.

What you think, is the oak and hickory to hard?

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Red oak is hard,hickory is one of THE hardest domestic woods.They can both be carved however,it just takes more time and a very sharp knife.One thing about red oak-it is a splintery wood.Hickory is very hard on tooling because of its inherent toughness.Personally,if I were going to carve a prototype it would be out of a more carver-friendly wood such as cedar or basswood.Basswood has been regarded as the premier carving wood by most carvers because of its characteristics.You could find out more by also doing a search on the topic.

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