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Brett

wood filler

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Been toying with a few ways of filling in holes and such for ballast weight, screw holes, etc.

Tried different wood fillers. Will be using epoxy as I want extreme durability.

Anyone have any experience they wish to share with other materials?

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APB turned me on to a new filler that is working great for me. It is the plumbers epoxy product in a tube from sLowes or Home Depot. It is a putty like product with both parts together in a roll. You pinch a piece off and mix it between you fingers. Goes on like wood filler but sets up in a few minutes and is hard as nails. I take alcohol on my finger to smooth it out because it is real hard to sand. Filled with metal particles. Paints gret and is harder than the wood.

Jerk!

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Jerkbait, sounds very interesting, just the kind of tidbit I was hoping to learn.

Sawdust trick is great as well, should have thought of this as my dad does this with white wood glue on his,,,,, interior wood crafts.

Thanks,,

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The same type of filler mentioned by Jerk is also made for wood.Called Quik Wood. The only place I've seen it is Rockler.Its sandable although hard and no metal shavings.Set time is about the same.BTW they also make it in plastic repair.

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Yo Brett they are all good ideas listed. Unfortunately some things that are tuff as nails can make shaping, molding and sanding difficult! EVEN with my Dremmel tool! I use Devcon to epoxy in my weights. I dont completely fill the hole with the epoxy! Once the epoxy is set and dried I will fill in the remainder of the hole with a latex wood filler. This is VERY easy to apply, sand and shape. I get the latex wood filler from home depot and a small 6 oz container is under $5.00! Once I shape and sand, I seal it with Devcon! See what I wrote to Terrydabassman in Flatsided Cranks II. Hope that helps! Cody

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I find epoxy too hard to sand so I use just enough to hold the weight but not fill the hole. Once the epoxy is dry I use Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty to fill the hole. It is a powder that you can mix to any consistancy you choose. It drys very hard but is quite sandable, especially if you catch it before it has fully set. Also, it does not shrink like some of the other putties I have used.

I can not find Durham's at Lowes or Home Depot but the ACE in my area carries it. A can goes a long way so it is a good value too.

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Durhams would be a good choice as I have some from making molds. I think the original request was for a filler that would be hard to knock out. Most wood fillers are either brittle or softer than wood. One good bite or bounce or hook poke and the surface is compromised. The epoxy paste, if smoothed while setting, requires little to no sanding (good thing too) and is ready for paint in 5 minutes. Been using it on my musky gliders and cranks and the areas where I add weight are almost invisble. I will try the Durhams tonight and see how it does.

Jerk

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The same type of filler mentioned by Jerk is also made for wood.Called Quik Wood. The only place I've seen it is Rockler.Its sandable although hard and no metal shavings.Set time is about the same.BTW they also make it in plastic repair.

are you talking about guick wood epoxy putty stick?. kbkindle

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Jerkbait,

Thanks for this tip, just tried it out,,, exactly what I was looking for,,,, the stuff is amazingly hard,,,,

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I tried the Durhams and it is good but is so hard it can be hard to shape once it's dry. I use plaster paris, cheap and works great. Make sure you mix it kind of thick so that it doesn't "settle" too much in the holes. Let it set up over night then sand to smooth.

jed v.

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I weight my crankbaits before I finish shaping them so,I just epoxy in the same diameter wood dowel a little longer than needed. Then all you have to do is trim the excess with the band saw, and hit it quick with the disc sander.Then do a final hand sand Good as new.

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Lots of great tips here. I was looking for something that would stand up to lures being dragged through a boulder field on bottom at 5 mph,,, this stuff will do the trick. Yes a little tricky but like anything always a few tricks to learn. I'm really impressed with how hard it gets.... I file is able to work out anything you couldn't smooth down.

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kbkindle here i use auto body filler the water prof kind a guart is about #8.00 will last you about 10 years its real heavy bodied and you mix a paste like hardner to it. will not come out and easy to sand kb

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Jerkbait

I bought that plumbers epoxy product a few years ago and never used it. I'm going to give it a try. After reading your previous post, this is exactly what I'm looking for. I was using 5 minute Devcon which worked well but I think this plumbers epoxy will be faster, easier to work with, especially using the alcohol on your finger to smooth out. I have tried latex and other fillers but had some problems with cracking and chipping out just like you were saying. Thanks. Jim

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