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Weighting and water temp.

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Testing some baits in the pool today and I got some baits I had made this spring that did'nt work out (they sank) now that the water temp is up there floating( I understand temp relate's to water density) So my question is how do you guy's get that happy meduim on weight, since I consider myself a shallow fisherman most of my cranking is in the spring and fall should I try to weight for cooler temps and if so how will this effect be in warmer water ? thank's I know your probably getting ill of all these questions :oops: the baits that sank did'nt sail to the bottom they just stayed down once cranked there

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This is a good, but tough question. Of all of the woods that I have tried, I would say that balsa is the most forgiving. It is so bouyant that you can really vary the weight in the bait and still have it work properly. I have had the same thing that you are talking about happen to baits that I have made out of hardwoods. So first I would recommend that you make the lure out of balsa.

To make an "All Season" crankbait, I would take the water temperature in a test bucket down to about 60 deg. Drill a hole about 1/4 inch dia. in the belly of the lure. Just slide the lip in the slot of the bait. You don't have to glue it in....just sit it in there. Put a weight in the hole and set it in the water. You want the water line to sit at least half way up the bait. The tip of the lip has to be under the water line so that the bait will start to dig as soon as you start the retrieve. Push down on the bait and watch it rise. If it comes up fairly well then that will work. If it comes up slow then I would lessen the amout of weight. If you are going to throw that bait in 40 or 45 deg. water, then it may suspend or come close to it. You want a good medium steady rise. If it comes up real fast then add some weight. You can do this without the wood being painted or protected. What many people don't know is that balsa does not absorb water. It is used to line welding tanks for that reason. It does get alittle heavier due to the water getting in the pores of the wood, but it will not get wet to the core like other woods will. As you do this remember that you will be adding the weight of the clearcoat to the bait. So if the bait is real close, then the weight of the clearcoat will change the baits floating ability. Cold water is denser than hot. This is the reason for the change in the baits floating ability. Regardless of how you weight the bait while doing it in the colder water, the bait will rise very quickly when the water hits the 80 to 95 deg. mark.

Ask all of the questions that you want. That is what we are all here for.

Skeeter

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