mark berrisford

shaping hardwood lures sander or dremel or router

16 posts in this topic

Hi guy's,i make gliders out of hardwood(mahogany or meranti)and currently shape em using a file and sandpaper and are getting some good result's however time is limited and was planning on getting a bit of help originally by getting a bench sander but realised i would struggle to sand tight inside curves.i then thought of a table mounted router but after reading up on past posts i realised they are a potentially fearsome piece of kit which i have no experience of.finally i came across the dremel and router bed which look's ideal but was wondering how it copes with hardwood's i don't want to buy something and find it won't do the job.comment's on all the above tool's would be greatly appreciated thanks Mark

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If the Dremmel "looks" ideal then I'm thinking you are seeing it doing what you would like to do in your mind. With the proper bits it will handle any wood you put it on. Some like the belt sander for initial takedown and then on to the dremmel for fine detailing. I've used a dremmel for years on everything you can imagine...it will do it!

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rotary tool is great like CrawChuck says, tons of accessories. If ur're looking to do details too, a flexcord is good, really saves ur hand holding that 20,000rpm beast in ur hand.

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You could also use a standard bench grinder. These things pack a lot of power and only cost about $35. You can grind wood with the standard wheels that come on them. No need to change to sandpaper wheels, just use the regular ones you would use to sharpen lawnmower blades. The technique requires you to hold the bait against the wheel and rotate by hand. Just find a grinder that has the metal shroud around the wheels that acts as a tool rest. That way you can brace the wood bait against the metal shroud while you rotate. This is how I make all of my baits.

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If the Dremmel "looks" ideal then I'm thinking you are seeing it doing what you would like to do in your mind. With the proper bits it will handle any wood you put it on. Some like the belt sander for initial takedown and then on to the dremmel for fine detailing. I've used a dremmel for years on everything you can imagine...it will do it!

Yes, +1000

Luremakers must have a Dremel!

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For the record, I still use a bench grinder sometimes. But only for certain body types and wood types. Now I agree with the others that dremel type tool is better in almost all situations. Good to see the old threads again. Glad everything wasn't lost forever.

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I've been designing router tables and router jigs during the last year. For anything smaller than a dinner plate they are NASTY.

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finally i came across the dremel and router bed which look's ideal but was wondering how it copes with hardwood's i don't want to buy something and find it won't do the job.comment's on all the above tool's would be greatly appreciated thanks Mark

If you are talking about the router set up that dremel has(?) I doubt it will do what you want. Only you know what you want to do or how you would do it, but here are some thoughts. The dremel router bits are very small shanked, which means they will not allow alot of preasure do to bending. Also, small objects and a router are extremely dangerous. I have a dremel router and table and I never found a way to use it for routing a bait. Good luck on your trials and lets us know the outcome.

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I just bought a Dremel Stylus. It is the cat's a$$! It fit's in your hand like a pencil, and let's you do very fine detail with ease! I would highly reccomend it to any lure maker!

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in the end i bought a router and mounted it into my bench and have to say it works very well,i make glide and jerkbaits that range from 4 to 9 inches,the wood has changed to beech for 90% of my lures.i also bought a dremel but don't find myself using it that much as i dont find it that good for large areas though i may start using it for detail in the future

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Hi Mark

Just like me you are making mostly flat sided lures. I use an angle grinder at the moment with a flat 5" sander attachment the type you velcro pads to, and also a dremel type multitool with a flexi attachment thingy and I can knock out a beech body from start to finish in around 15 mins, however I have promised myself a belt and disc sander when I get a few spare spondoolies together, I have seen one in action and they are awesome, the beauty of them is the belt will lift from flat to vertical so you have that round edge of the belt sander for those tricky internal corners and if you want a real tight internal corner you could always turn to the dremel drum sander.Follow the link to an example.

By the way Mark I got the envirotex lite and have finished 2 lures with it doing nothing different from what I was doing and they have turned out 100%, I'm not claiming success yet as I don't want to give it the kiss of death but I'm hopefull my probs with that are over, many thanks.

philB (Leeds)

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/CHARNWOOD-W407-Combination-Belt-and-Disc-Sander-NEW_W0QQitemZ200071171239QQihZ010QQcategoryZ20782QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

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Hi Phil

made up that the e-tex has worked out for you.i've got a belt and disc sander and your right a great piece of kit,keep your eyes open for offers at aldi or netto they have some good deals on at times for tool's i got mine from netto for £25 had it about 6 month's now and you can't fault it

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I use a sanding drum mounted in my drill press. It works like a poor man's spindle sander. Nice thing is it allows one tool to do double duty, or if you want a dedicated sander you can get by with a Harbour Frieght cheapy drill press ($40 on sale). It also takes less space than the spindle sanders and it is so easy to chuck up different size drums.

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