allstate48

Gravity flow airbrush

6 posts in this topic

I'd like to get a gravity flow brush. I've got two bottom feeds, but can't get the fine pattern I want. Maybe it's me( probably is) but I can't get the fine lines I want. I don't use one that much, so do't want to spend much. Thanks Doug

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Paasche has the Vjr, which I have, and badger has a low priced one as well, I just don't know which on it is, try Bear Air or Dixie Airbrush

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I have a Paasche VL and an Iwata gravity feed HP-B Plus. I don't believe gravity feed will make a finer pattern. That's a function of the tip/needle/cone used in the brush. The Iwata comes with one tip/needle/cone that shoots a very fine, very finely atomized pattern that is suitable for fine line work to general coverage work with acrylic paint. The VL and similar brushes have much larger apertures, even using their finest spray sets. I never got my VL to freehand fine lines (maybe some guys can, but not me). The HP-B solved that. Alternatively, you can stick with the VL and use friskets to get the fine details done. More than one way to skin a cat! BTW, my HP-B has the smallest 1/8 oz gravity feed cup, which has turned out to be plenty of paint to shoot a few crankbaits. Makes it easy to clean, too.

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Thanks for the replys.BobP, I was thinking with a gravity feed, you wouldn't need as much air pressure. But, I understand what you're saying also. I think a Iwata is what I need, and want. Thanks again for the help. Doug

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Less pressure and finer lines are not the same thing.

Less pressure can be used through a gravity feed,versus a siphon feed given the same viscosity paint.

Finer lines will be a result of a smaller nozzle / needle combo.

Paint viscosity will be the governing factor on smaller nozzle needle combos. Thick paint wont spray through these.

If you spray at high air pressure with a reduced paint, I have found that you lose control of the paint and it begins to spider web.

So when reducing paint or thinning the paint. The brush that sprays with the least amount of air pressure will win, hands down! This will always be a gravity feed brush.

Iwata Gravity feeds are impossible to beat!

JMO

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Yes, I use 10-15 psi on my Iwata HP-B for lines and 35-40 psi for general coating/shading. It's very adaptable. They are hand tuned at the factory for spray pattern and you can really see a difference when you run water through the Iwata versus a Paasche VL. The VL is a heavy mist; the HP is almost as fine as smoke and more uniform. I still use a VL and a Badger Crescendo for color basecoating and shooting coarse hobby acrylics. They are still great tools. But the HP opens a new level of precision. Fine color gradation and details that were definitely beyond my very average airbrush skills are now now within reach - or at least feasible with more experience and practice :)

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