fatfingers

Polycarbonate polishing...

15 posts in this topic

Does anyone know of an easy way to polish the edge of a bait lip to eliminate the fine marks left from cutting and sanding polycarbonate (when making a lip for a bait)?

If I recall, Lapala once describe rubbing the edges on a piece of carpeting until the sides were as clear as the flat portions of the lip. I know commercial outfits do it, but I don't know how its done.

Cloth buffing wheel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This appears to be auto compound. Me thinks a bit on a buffing wheel make take care of your needs. Got it From LB 101.

Doesn't work on SS, ;)

commandant.jpg Everybody is troubled by it. You built a beautiful crankbait, but the lexan lip is very dull and scratched. Not a pretty sight indeed. And since we are all perfectionist, we can't stand it.

Here is the solution. Simply polish the lip with a little commandant and it will be clear and shiny. The scratches are gone. Be carefull though. Don't polish the crankbait itself. You could damage the paint. Commandant is used on cars to polish away little scratches in the paint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The simple solution, without using any aditives is to fine sand the poly, and rub it very hard on the carpet for example. Rubbing it on artificial fibers gives a better effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use dremel with a felt wheel plus plastic polishing wax, never said anything about carpet LOL Sanding with fine grit 300 and then use a "flame thrower" on the sanded part works too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You can use Brasso to clean scratches off plastic lenses used on watch faces.

Really?! What about glass faces?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fatfingers,

I have also used Weldon 4 (acrylic glue) is aka: methylene chloride on a Q-tip to polish edges of Lexan Bills. It evaporates extremely fast, and the fumes are bad so use in well ventilated area. It really clarifies the edge, and will remove the sharp edges.

Thanks,

Maypo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fatfingers,

Funny you should talk about that....I just bought some stuff on ebay called Koala Lexan cleaner/polish. I haven't got it yet but will let you know how it works. I have the Novus1, 2 and 3 plastic/lexan polish and it doesn't work very well..... The commandant 4 I've heard is great, but try and get it....it is dutch made and you can't get it in the states.

Rod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys.

As usual the guys at TU have the answers and are more than willing to help each other.

Got to love that!

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that the guys that build the acrylic computer cases use a small torch and quickly run it over the edges. It is a practiced art not to hold it in one spot too long. I don't know it it would work on something as small as a lip though. I'll have to give it a try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Really?! What about glass faces?

Not sure about the glass watch faces. Never used it on any but plastic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks guys.

As usual the guys at TU have the answers and are more than willing to help each other.

Got to love that!

:)

And I know you'll give each one of them a shot and report your findings, here.:yay:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a little rectangle foam block women file and polish fingernails with. It has four colors one each side and the sanding coursness starts at about 800 and the fouth is about 2000 grit. Awesome little gadget to use on epoxy boo boos as well. Cost about a buck!!!! My wife still can't find hers.:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have smoothed off the edges of lexan lips using heat. I have a small hand-held butane torch. Camel1918 is correct, though, you must be super careful. If you hit one spot too long you might get a burn or a bubble. Hope this helps. Please let us know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried allot of different things and what works best for me is sanding from 220 down to 800 then a quick touch with the buffing wheel on the dremle tool with some rouge they really shine nice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now