bassinjody

splitting wood

20 posts in this topic

i just split two crankbaits. i first drilled pilot holes could it be dull drill bits or the wood to dry the holes are for the belly weights . any information from you experts would be great.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d197/bassinjody/000_0041.jpg

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d197/bassinjody/000_0041.jpg

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d197/bassinjody/000_0041.jpg

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Dull bits could be the culprit, but by looking at the photos, it looks like the wood has some wild grain which is more likely your problem.

mind if I ask what type of wood that is?

When selecting wood, look for cuts with the straightest, most uniform grain pattern & keep the grain running from nose to tail when you carve.

You do have some chipping of the wood around the ballast holes also, so its most likely a combination of the 2, dull bits & poorly chosen wood.

Don't give up, the carving job looks pretty darn good, get ya some fresh bits & straighter grained wood & you should be good to go.

definitely predrill for your screweyes or you might split em again.

If you're set on salvaging those, glue & clamp the splits, then use some type of putty (wood/joint compound/bondo) to refill the damaged areas.

It might not pruduce a perfect result, but I know its tough to lose the work you put into it. Making a little extra effort to repair the bait is good practice & they might even go on to catch ya some fish.

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That's a big hole in i tiny piece of wood.

Try clamping the bait in a vice before drilling. surround the wood with material to keep the pressure on over the full length (and to protect the carving). That should work.

I would also suggest drilling a hole that size in a scrap piece of similar proportions before committing that amount of time and effort, easy to say in hind sight, probably made you feel worse.

I usually drill a test piece because my hand held drilling skills are notoriously bad.

I assume you are not using a pillar drill.

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If you want to avoid splitting wood try using Forstner bits in place of regular drill bits. They are several times the price of the regular wood bits, but worth every cent. Good Luck, Joe

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its a peice of a picket fence that was laying around. im not sure what type of wood it is. it was drilled with a small drill press.:oooh:

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I bet you are using a standard twist bit, applying too much preassure, and not clamping or holding you stock securely.

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I drill all my weight holes with a Forstner bit in a drill press while the stock is still square. Never a problem.

Rod

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all great advise with the forstner bit but also it looks like you are drilling with that size bit 1st you should start small and then work your way up. If I am wrong about that then its just the fact that your bits are very dull.

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For a filler materal for the holes, you can use Marine Epoxy. It is a two part stick epoxy, sold at Walmart in the Auto Dept. with the paints and fiberglass. It will be on a peg boad. Dries quick, and sands very easy. Used for small fiberglass repairs. Dries very stong.

When drilling if you are having a problem, try running your bit through a bar of soap first. This might help. Good Luck.

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I really like the tip using forstner bits. I going to start using them, it would seem it would assist in centering the hole also.

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More than likely the wood is a real coarse cedar that they use for fencing. The stuff is real tough. I may have been pretty weathered. I will have to agree with Red. You could probably use some new bits. Another problem with that type of cedar is what Red said about grain. That stuff has the toughest knarliest grain in the world. That grain will really rise out of the wood once you get it wet with anything. (sealer, paint, etc) Go get some better wood. White or red cedar would be much better. You can also make good crankbaits out of pine also. Go to Lowes. They have craft wood already cut, sanded, and square. They do it in both pine and poplar.

Skeeter

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went out and bought some new bits, got a little vise, cut two baits out clamped them in,drilled both baits and luckly they did not split. i have two more pieces of that picket fence stuff , and then off to lowes i go. will post a picture sunday of the new baits.thanks for all the help guys :yay:

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If you have an A.C. Moore or Micheals craft store near you they sell blocks of basswood fairly cheap. The best part is every week they have a 40% off coupon in the paper, so you can get wood dirt cheap :)

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If you want to avoid splitting wood try using Forstner bits in place of regular drill bits. They are several times the price of the regular wood bits, but worth every cent. Good Luck, Joe

Forstner bits, IMO, are indespensable for this hobby and most anyone who picks up a drill on a regular basis. I agree with Skeeter that perhaps the grain/weathering is to blame first, then perhaps the bits used. Splits almost always occur due to weak grain patterns.

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I bought a set of four forstner bits in a case, off the dremel shelf of a large hardware shop in Sweden. 3/32" 1/8" 5/32" & 3/16". So they are available.

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You might want to try getting some basswood to use. Most hobby shops have it. You can get a blank wall plaque (8" X 10" X 3/4 " thick) and draw out your patterns. As said before, you need to make sure your drill bit is sharp. I usually always start out drilling the pilot hole with a small diameter bit. Then go back and use a larger bit. I sometimes use three different size bits if I am drilling into narrow pieces (to avoid splitting). Also as said before, make sure your wood grain runs horizontal and straight. A good sharp drill bit will almost pull itself through the wood. Keep reading these posts. There are many talented builders that post. I have learned many lessons.

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I think the main culprit is the wood. Both the choice, and the grain. And you do have to use Forstner bits. They have a centering pin, to keep the bit from drifting, and a spur at the outer edge to cut the outside diameter cleanly first.

Then the recessed cutting edge removes the wood from the hole.

You can buy a cheap set at Harbor Freight that will pay for itself immediately.

I use one to make recessed for my eyes, too. I predrill my blank all the way through where I want the eyes while it's square with a small bit, to be sure the eyes are positioned the same on both sides of the lure, and then use a Forstner bit after they're shaped, letting the centering pin ride the thru pilot hole. A denser, straighter grained wood is much easier to shape, tool, and weight.

Diagonal grain, and grain that's too far apart, makes a weaker foundation to start with.

People used to stare when I'd go through all the hammers on the rack to get one with the best grained handle, but I didn't break hammer handles.

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forstner bits are the way to go it almost looks like you tried to use a spade bit.If you did use a spade bit but it back in the toolbox.

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