tightliner

stencel making, how do you make a good one?

29 posts in this topic

hi fellers, I've been painting my own stuff for a few years but I'll be darned if I can create a good stencil beyond making gills and spots. I've tried the stencil making material from the craft stores and it works fine but when it comes to making one for the body on a curved bait I have a real problem. Since its going to be spring soon I wanted to make a craw fish pattern on some wiggle warts I have so I wanted to ask some of you guys how to go about it before I screw up another paint job. PS> do any of you guys use a special holder for the bait, like a fly tying rig when painting. Many thanks, Ed.

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Riverman great looking bait. But how do you get the designs soeven. Surely you dont freehand the designs on stencil paper and then cut out the designs with a exacto knife. I need to make some stencils but also dont know where to start.

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That's how I do it, with an exacto knife. I lay the plastic down on a payne of glass after I've drawn or traced a pattern. Then cut it out with the knife. It's the cleanest way I've found.

I've tried burning and using a bit on the dremal, the knife is just easier in the long run.

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my main question is where or should I say how do you come up with the patterns and do you have many because of the different size of lures.

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I drew mine out on a piece of cardboard......it was from the side of a cereal box, Wheaties I think, lol. I then cut it out very carefully with a sharp pair of scissors. The trick is to go slow!! Take your time.

RM

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you couold try using a plastic gallon bottle. cut out your stencil. i personally use very thin lexan and cut my stencils. some stencils are 10 years old.

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I haven't reached the stage of spray templates as yet. But, as an engineer I am big on jigs.

I will be making my templates out of acetate sheet as used by overhead projectors. It is very cheap (everyone knows someone who works in an office). A dozen sheets of A4 will give you enough sheets to last a lifetime. They are very easy to cut with a sharp modellers knife.

They can be mounted onto curved frames made of stiff cardboard.

presumably, the lure is held in the same position each time by a clamp system of some sorts. If the free standing acetate frame has a couple of pointers, one for the nose, another for the tail, then the frame could be positioned in the same location every time, without error or hassle. the pointers don't touch the lure, just position both ends of the lure. Thus you control height, width, depth, distance and angle relative to the lure and gain repeatability without any effort.

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try this....put the acetate sheet into thinner, or acetone. It won't melt but it'll make it really soft, and after that make a 3D template of any lure u wish. How things r going to evolve from here it's up to anyones imagination

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That's the point of this site. Bring on the ideas, no matter how wacky, then we can choose the best that suits us individually. There is rarely one best solution that suits everyone.

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I've just put the vernier on a piece. Thickness 0.13mm or 5 thou' in American money.

It is very thin but not as floppy as you would expect.

When glued to a curved former or frame it becomes quite stiff, certainly stable enough to handle for spray templates. It takes to super glue if you rough it up with fine emery.

A single frame could be manufactured and the templates made interchangeable, by hanging on pegs or velcro. I'm sure more ideas will come to light.

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To be honest I try not to use stencils as I find the look of stenciled paint to be very "unnatural". But some patterns just look better with a stencil and there is no way around it. I like vodkamans idea of using a curved frame.

RM

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I tried a couple of types of adhesive stencils and none worked very well. Even the "light tack" stencil will lift recently sprayed and flash dried acrylic paint. Or it will leave adhesive residue (just as bad!). I still use it but now just don't take the backing off. It's nice to have a more durable stencil that won't wear out after 3 baits. Otherwise, it's too much hassle to carve them. But it needs some pliability to conform to round baits. And I prefer a stencil made with a non-slick material so overspray will stick to the stencil and not run onto the bait. Maybe cereal boxes are ideal :)

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Thanks for the replys guys , I didn't realize so much help was out there. I'll post my first craw pattern when I get'er done> Ed

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P.S. Forgot to mention that after u get the stencils out of the thinnes(te acetate....) they will harden again.

@maximusgunn it's exactly the stuff vodkaman was talknig about.

Another option r the aluminium boxes u get fast food to go from some restaurants.

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I like blank clear stencil material, such as found in the craft stores or in craft sections of wal-mart, etc. I cut it with a stencil cutter--same as a wood burner with different tips. Draw your design on the stencil and place it on a sheet of glass. Make each cut without removing your tip until finished. use small metal objects, or templates for guides for making smooth lines and curves. Yes it takes some practice, but I have stencils I've been using for over 3 years with no end in sight, using water-base paints. They clean with a damp rag wipe and are ready for the next lure, or the opposite side of that lure. I hold mine with clips in front of the lure usually not touching the lure for soft edges. For harder edges I'll increase paint flow and hold closer, or directly on lure, often with a gloved hand. Because these stencils are transparent they allow easy exact placement on the lure, which I consider a big advantage. You can also tape-off portions for different or different-sized lures, or just to modify the design.

Dean

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The links below are my solution to hands free operation.

It has not een built, but I made a cardboard version and it worked fine.

The stensils 'snap' into place past the pegs and lift out from the front or back with ease. The stensil is held quite firmly using acetate sheet and it will work with any material that tends to spring back to flat.

I think the pictures are clear enough for construction, but if anyone wants more info, I am prepard to draw it up with instructions.

http://aolpictures.aol.co.uk/galleries/folicallychalled/1de0uAWn7u0u-R-x0SDQCJxquoXFbCnLzvgfv4xQp5Fd3Ig=/large/

http://aolpictures.aol.co.uk/galleries/folicallychalled/1de0uAWn7u0u-R-x0SDQCJxquo1y7ErXS8y5v4xQp5Fd3Ig=/large/

There are lots of possibilities for improvement. Many more ideas could be incorporated, but I decided to keep it simple for discussion purposes.

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Should work good! This could possibly present a problem, air from the airbrush going under the stencil were the is a force fit (stop pins) and being lifted from the frame.

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The back of the pins could be notched at the base, or replaced with a rail, chamfered at the base. That should hold it.

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