fatfingers

Quick Tips...take em all, but leave one of your own!

147 posts in this topic

Everyone fishing crankbaits--Keep the sharp edges off the lips! You can dress them with medium-to-fine sandpaper, or got to either your hobby store or cosmetics section of your favorite great big discount store with a large blue logo and buy foam-backed fingernail type files in various grades to soften those sharp edges, whether they're this way from the lure or lip maker, or have developed jagged little spots through use. Particularly when playing larger fish near the boat, and more particularly when changing direction while leading them around are you subject to drag your line over the lip under pressure, and heartbreak will be sudden and decisive. If you're lucky the fish will come back very quickly and throw the bait. I waited and got back many cranks while figuring out the cause. It will seldom happen with small fish. The same thing applies to guys throwing metal lips; always check for and eliminate any rough edges! Please avoid my learning curve, and apply prevention, or it will happen to you when you least want it to!

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Thats some sound advice, Dean. Several old baits incorporated several inches of wire leader which attached to the line tie on the bill.

I suspect their motive was to eliminate the aforementioned and to keep the toothy ones on the line.

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I agree FF. There's too much good information here for it not to be right up front! It answers a lot of typical user questions especially for those new to the site, or lure-building, and is also useful to those with more experience. Mods, please sticky this again!

Dean

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Here's a tip for those who are looking to repaint large jointed swimbaits and need a clean way to hold it.

Take a hacksaw frame, and run some short wire sections from the line tie and rear hook hanger to the blade holding tabs. Tighten up the blade tensioner, and you have the bait joints held apart and sturdy enough for easy painting.

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Here's a tip for those who are looking to repaint large jointed swimbaits and need a clean way to hold it.

Take a hacksaw frame, and run some short wire sections from the line tie and rear hook hanger to the blade holding tabs. Tighten up the blade tensioner, and you have the bait joints held apart and sturdy enough for easy painting.

I'd like to second that bassinfool99. This does work great, and hacksaw frames can be picked up cheap at garage/yard sales or flea markets. I now have several ( 4 ) and think I have $5-$6 tied up.

BTW I should have noticed this thread before I made my last post in hard baits about preserving Dicknite top coat. Just so I don't make this too long, you might check it out.

David

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I finally found a cheap way to do this. It's definitely a compromise but it works well for me.

You can buy soft suction catheters from a medical supply store. They'll know what you're talking about. You need size 10&12 french. A lot more of the 10 than the 12. The 10 fits inside the hole that's in the cap of the bottle. Cut that to length then cut about 1/2" of size 12. The 10 fits inside the size 12. Not so tight that it's hard to get in, but tight enough that it won't slip. Slide the 10 in about halfway. The 12 fits the intake on the airbrush perfectly. The catheters cost less than a dlooar each and you can make 3-4 tubes with each length of size 10.

Now, the compromises.........

The size 10 isn't super tight in the cap, but will stay. Some bottles will slowly slide down the tubing, but if you pay attention to it you won't have a problem. You could probably add a drop of epoxy or something to widen the tubing where it fits the cap. I never bothered. You can also drill out the hole so the 12 fits tightly, but I wanted to be able to close the bottles tightly.

The bottle isn't vented.......I just crack the cap to vent it.

The bottle isn't rigidly attached to the brush. Didn't bother me at all.

You can also search on ebay for 2 oz plastic bottles. You can get then with different types of caps...I bought some with regular caps and drilled holes in the tops so the tubing fit tightly enough that it wouldn't move. Then vent holes.

Remove the tubes from the createx bottles when finished painting and rinse them out. If you leave them in and the waint warms up, it'll come out of the tubing. (been there done that)

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If you use an Iwata gravity feeder, get yourself a small "stippling brush" from the craft store. It works great to clean out the paint down in the bowl below and on both sides of the needle.

I also use an acid brush, but the tiny stippling brush really reaches down in there and cleans out that area where the needle enters the forward channel near the nozzle.

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If you use a top coat and heat flash to help set it up do not put the heat too close,( Dang-it )

Do not put dicknite lure coat in a hard plastic container that is clear and used for paint, it will eat through it!!! and if you have a lure that was custom painted by someone that you just bought sitting next to it, kiss the paint job good-by ( Dang-it )

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Don't know if this has been talked about before but I got a tip the other day from a guy at the boat ramp on making Spook type plugs.He gets hardwood dowel rods from the hardware store.Get the diameter you want,cut to length,and taper the ends.I've haven't done this yet but he said it works great.I'm pretty new to this board and I will agree Fatfingers that it needs to be a sticky so Learners like me wont have to go all over the board for some great quick tips.You guys on this board sure make my 12hr. shifts go by pretty fast at the old drawbridge.Hope this helps someone.

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Storing Dick Nite Lurecoat. I decant a quart of DN into glass salsa bottles with the narrowed neck and flared top. Dick Nite says wine bottles work great if you spray or brush DN but I like to dip bass baits and 16 oz salsa bottles are just right for that. Tall enough for jerkbaits and just wide enough for other baits. Fill the salsa bottle to the neck where it gets smallest, about 2" diameter. Hold the bait with locking forceps while you dip. Screw the top on tight afterwards and cover it with tin foil. The idea is to minimize the surface area of the polyurethane exposed to air in the bottle. Thick & Chunky Medium Hot is my favorite :)

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Cutting lip slots :

While experimenting with the scroll saw, I noticed that a blade that I very seldom use was half the thickness of the lexan lip.

I have a Dewalt scroll saw and it has an allen screw adjustment to control the blade insert opening. (Your probably 10 steps ahead) Put 2 two blades side by side in this opening. When you cut the lip slot in the body of the crankbait, perfect slot every time.

Caution: This may not be an original idea. I am new at this and never know if the problem has been addressed this way.

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Drilling sectional baits.

I made my first triple fish knockoff, just to try to make a jointed bait. I used back to back screw eyes, and learned quickly about making sure your lure segments are longer than the screw eye. :o)

I also learned that there isn't as much room in lure segments for hook hangers, weighting, and hinge parts.

So I decided to use the hinge pin of stainless wire method, to eliminate one half of the screw eyes, and to make assembly easier.

I shaped the lure completely, then cut it into sections, and beveled the sections so they nested. >> About a 70 degree angle, actually, 35 degrees each face.

I made a jig for the drill press so I could drill the hinge pin holes after I'd made the segments, since it is so much easier to shape a lure that's all one piece.

It's just a 4X4 screwed to a 3/4" plywood base, with a ripping of 3 1/2" wide 3/4" plywood cut to the bevel angle of the male segment, and screwed to the side of the 4X4.

I put the lure segment up against the 4X4 where the plywood makes a corner, so the corner holds the segment square to the jig, even though it's shaped on the bottom, not flat. I hold the lure piece by hand. I position the jig so that the drill bit is centered over where I want the hole, clamp the plywood base down to the drill press table, and drill. I use a slightly oversized drill bit to drill most of the way through the lure segment, and finish the hole with a straight piece of the actual sst wire as a bit.

It's harder to explain than it is to do, and it works. If you drill the hole too far from the point of the lure segment, you can just sand the segment until the point is closer to the hinge hole. It won't matter in terms of looks or how the lure works.

I'm basically a lazy person, so, trust me, this is easy, and it makes shaping the lure easier because it's still in one piece.

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Mark, I may be able to offer an easier way for you to make your joints, I dunno. This is how I do it, here goes nothin'.

I get my profiles traced on my piece of 1x2, including my joints. Next I go to the band saw and cut each joint almost all the way to center line. I make sure there is still enough material left uncut that the wood will not move, yet. Now, since I have my segment angles marked, I then take it to the drill press and drill my pin holes. This makes it easier to have holes straight cause the wood is still a block, and the holes will offer no problems with forming bait. The next step is to form the bait. I sand down the profiles on oscillating sander, then get rounded form with piece of sandpaper glued inside piece of pvc pipe. When shape is almost done, I get down to the hand sanding to finish forming, then getting as smooth as I can. I then go back to band saw and carefully finish the segment cuts, and to belt sander to widen angle on female side of joint (to get maximum movement). Then use Dremel to dig out slots for eye screws.

Not sure if any of this makes sense, but will try to answer any questions. Just shoot me a pm and I'll give it my best shot. Kinda pleased with the way the baits come out, they swim just great. Now if I can only get a decent paint job on them I'll be happy camper er, fisherman. LOL

Just my $.02

David

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In order to keep track of the great ideas posted on threads like this, start a document (using MS Word, WordPerfect, or other good document processor) and pull the text, photos, diagrams, web links, etc.,

Use a numbered Chapter and Paragraph heading along with the Table of Contents (AKA: TOC) feature to a keep track of the subject matter. As you get better practiced, adding hyper-links, a Table of Figures (TOF), and a collection of data and information that will never stop growing.

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David,

That sounds like a great way. I'll try it next. I just hinged and weighted my first 10" bait, and it's out in the garage drying after the first coat of Miniwax sealer. Can't wait to see how it sits in the water and moves.

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Great thread.

Here's a few of mine ....

When's the last time you ever picked up live bait and the sides were smooth as silk? For most plastics, I tend to rough up the outside of the bait a bit wanting texture.

For hanging and baking jigs, get some strapping tape and bend it and pop rivit it into a base. Base's can be made of any scrap metal.

For baking jigs -- get a dedicated over and dont subject your family to lead and paint fumes in the family over or toaster over.

Rod Bond is a great two part epoxy that acts like butter when mixed and takes forever to cure hard so the parts can be moved w/o worry of the epoxy setting. I use it on everything.

Keep plenty of denatured alcohol on hand. Works great for everything from clean up, annual reel/rod clean up and maintenace and lamp burning for heating jigs before painting.

Use plenty of sunscreen and a good set of sunglasses when outside.

Scents in plastics work. Not to attract fish, but to make them hold on that additinoal time to allow the angler to set the hook.

Teach a kid to fish!

Be generous with your home made baits. It'll come back to you 10-fold in ways you'll never imagine.

Straw rattles inside tubes work. Avoid glass, since glass breaks and can fill the fish's mouth with glass.

Follow directions on the side of powderpaint bottles (on everything else too). I know, men don't need no stinking directions, but they are there for a reason.

Get a cheap set of nail clippers and epoxy an old shoe lace around them. Wear them around your neck to nip line - your teeth will thank you.

Become one with nature on your water. Not only will your trip be more enjoyable, the birds will direct you to where the fish are feeding.

I've never complained about my lead being to hot before pouring.

A home made tool is more satisfing to the user than one bought.

Become friends with your dentist and get some used picks.

The secrete to catching more fish is keeping your line constantly wet.

Happy New Year to all!

edit. A few more.

Drill small holes in spinner bait or inline spoons. This will cause a tiny bubble stream to trail the bait attracting fish.

Clip hooks off of store bought inlines, and upgrade them and attach with a #3 or 4 snap ring. This allows the hook to trail the bait 1/4" and gives more motion.

Tie feathers, maribou, flashapoo, onto trebels of inlines.

Kirb trebels before installing.

Replace hooks on store bought crank or jerk baits with better quality. Kirb hooks. Add tail to rear hook. Add red hook to middle hook.

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On reviving Powder Paint.

Sometimes I may go a a while and not use one of my many colors of Powder Paint.

Although I store all my powder in a refrigerator, in airtight containers, sometimes certain colors get a little "stiff".

Solution: Go to Dollar General and get yourself one of those miniature hand held food processors. They hold about a 2 cup capacity and cost under $10.00

Add your "stiff" Powder to the mixing cup and "letr rip"

Caution: Make dang sure you latch the lid down properly first.

I also do this to green pumpkin, watermelon and black everytime I use it regardless of how new or old it is.

Regards,

Blades

OH :eek: .......................... I almost forgot. Here's another one.

Never by anything that eats while you sleep :lol:

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Don't do your final touch-up sanding over a sink full of dishes. Those slippery suckers are just itching for an early swim!

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I can't get over the talent and the ideas coming from you Guys,, I'm kinda new to the site and have been building for a little over a year. I sure hope I can add to this thread with good tips. The only one I have for now is ,,, If your looking to make a drying wheel , go to the Home Depot or Menards and in the electrical department look for empty wire reels on the "bulk" rack.. you can find different sizes to suit your needs and they should be able to give you the empty one as they just toss them.

I'll try and get a pic up off a drying wheel I made with a reel !!

Again , thanks for all the great ideas !!!

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New to crankbait carving and painting but came up with an idea so I don't have so much to remember.

I know that most will write down everything about a particular bait, sketch, template, weight, location of hook hangers ect.

I write down everything about blends of PAINT that I make. I have a spiral notebook dedicated to paint, and nothing but paint. Write the "parts" such as 6 parts leaf green, 2 parts sand, 1 part dark brown (for green pumpkin) once the paint is mixed to your liking. I then take either a finger or a popsicle stick and make a small smear of the paint on the paper so that I can see EXACTLY what color it is and am able to quickly and easily replicate the color.

WAIT until the paint is COMPLETELY dry before turning over to the next page!!!!

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Here's one, if the joints on my baits are uneven or i just want them tighter, i melt the end of a glue stick and put a drop on the edges where they meet. It ends up looking like a little booger on the side of the bait but its worked wonders for me when i need to alter a finished bait.

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I mixed up a batch of pop for a mold and placed it on the clothes dryer.The vibrations help grt rid of the trapped air bubbles.

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