Pete

foam question

44 posts in this topic

Husky don't give up on foam yet.

Here's something from Nishine Lure Works to inspire you. I don't believe their claim on N-Foam lol, Foam is foam but maybe they have some extra additive. Foams I gets here are of the kind that u vary their mix ration to get diff density, so the potential is definately still there.

There is a well know company in US that uses foam too but have since been sold. THe name escapes me for now. (signs of inhaling too much lacquer and saw dust? 8O)

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i'm not sure if this helps...

i also use foam for big/heavy pike lures (thx for teaching me Husky :worship: ). the polyurethan foam i'm using is hard and buoyant, so if i want to make the bait heavy (i.e. sinking) i just put some lead in it. the expansion rate of the foam is 1:17 (1 liter will be enough for a lot of lures). the exact mixing ratio of the components (a+B) is crucial. the "resin" is very liquid so i have never experianced any problems with airbubbles. pot life is very short! 90 seconds and the reaction begins to start. demolding after 270 seconds. i made the "casting channel" a bit larger to gain some time while casting due to the short pot life. the surface of the bait comes out of the mold very smooth. i never managed to get a good result with putty molds (even with mold release), so i'm using rtv-silikone.

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Suddeth crankbaits (now extinct?) were made from foam and had a good reputation. You could order the baits floating or sinking. Cheesehead, I would think 2 materials of the same density would behave identically as far as action, need for ballast, etc. What properties of foam didn't you like? 16 lb/cu ft is higher than balsa but less than most hardwoods.. close to paulownia at 18 lb/cu ft. I wonder how variable the density of 16 lb/cu ft foam is, depending on temp, handling, mixing, etc?

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I am coming in late here and have not read all of this topic, so if I am off track please excuse me. In a past life and in my youth, I used to make surf boards with foam. to get a higher density in the foam, excess foam mixture was prepared and then blended was quickly poured into the mould. These moulds were concrete and sealed with a series of clamps around the joint. The foam would expand at the normal rate , but because the volume was confined it would be compressed to a very strong dense but still boyant foam. pete

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I just pored a bunch 16lb foam swimbaits this weekend for the first time and they are ready for paint. what is the best base coat before I airbrush with Creatix and seal with devcon ?

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I just pored a bunch 16lb foam swimbaits this weekend for the first time and they are ready for paint. what is the best base coat before I airbrush with Creatix and seal with devcon ?

WASH them with warm soapy water to assure all MR is removed. I dip them in Propionate to get a smooth base coat.

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So after I apply Propionate I can just start layering creatix? no primer?

This may sound Dumb but what is Propionate and where can I get some?

Has anyone use a plastic primer as a base coat?

Thanks

K.C.

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I plan to use POLYWOOD for pouring my line of KOMMA KOZZY KRANKZ

Have any of you guys used this product?

What do you think of it?

PolyWood™ is a rapid set casting compound filled with silicate glass bead (microballoons). It offers, lightweight, good strength and low 0.53 density. PolyWood™ is easily machined, sanded or carved and resists heat to 140°F. It is excellent for casting rigid, non-absorbing, deep water floatation devices or syntactic foam parts. At great depths (high pressure) PolyWood™ maintains buoyancy and resists compression (we also offer a neutral buoyancy flexible urethane)

Thankz,

HAWG HUNNA

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Hawg. I tried the polywood several years ago and had problems with it curing. The tech staff told me that my problem may be that I was trying to mold too narrow of a part and these were 7" long by 7/8" diameter cylinder type muskie lures. I did not have that problem with featherlite or 16#foam in the same mold. Seemed like tough stuff if you could get it to cure right, but too spotty for me.

Cliff

www.alleycatlures.com

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Hello HAWGHUNNA,

I spent a lot of time, money, effort ect. trying to make Polywood work. I was convinced that it would replace my wood lures. I made lots of molds out of bondo and invested in a static mixer. I was able to make some lures but found that every time I ordered new Polywood it was different. Weighed different and mixed different leaving the lure weight different.

Then came trying to paint without the lure looking like the surface of the moon with craters and pinholes. Yes I washed the lures in everything from caustic soda to MEK and I let them cure for weeks at a time. I used several types of release agents and even shoe polish. The tech told me it was some sort of phenomenon that was occuring. His way of saying give up and dont bother me anymore.

Then when I did finaly get some lures to come out ok, I exitedly handed them out to my best customers for their aproval only to hear. Nope, dont sound right and dont run right, I like the old ones better.

So I cut my losses and went back to good ole WOOD.

I havnt tried the other types of foam mentioned but plan to in the future.

Good luck...............

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