Snax

Anyone spray on their two part epoxy?

14 posts in this topic

I'm just curious if it would even be possible to spray on two part epoxy? When warmed up in a bowl of hot water (in its container of course!) before mixing, the epoxy is fairly watery and should be sprayable. I have a new Iwata Kustom Hi-Line TH airbrush which has a large needle and nozzle that I got for spraying primer and it may work.

I realize that as the epoxy starts to set that it will become thicker but I'm curious if anyone has attempted it?

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Hey Snax,

I don't know about shooting two part epoxy,but I do know of guys shooting Dicknites top coat..Nathan

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I'm not familiar with that product. Is it a two part epoxy or a urethane?

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Hi Snax

I don't know about spraying through an airbrush but the guy who supplies my paints also manufactures aerosols and he produces a 2 part epoxy aerosol that you strike the bottom of the can and this automatically mixes the two parts together which you then spray just like you would a spray paint so I would assume that this could be done with proper thinning of the epoxy. However I could imagine fatal results for the nozzle should cleaning not be done correctly:nono:. I cant imagine why someone would want to risk that as brushed on epoxy naturally flattens anyway.

philB

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The reason is to apply the epoxy without me having to have it drip all over the place. Less waste and I'd be able to build up the thickness better with less run off.

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If you search around you'll find several companies that make sprayable epoxy. If you want to go that route, I highly recommend that you also look into explosion proof exhaust fans, respirators, and other needed safty gear. If you are only doing a few plugs at a time, spraying epoxy is not worth it. If you are doing runs of 50+ plugs at a time, it may be worth your while. My 2 cents.

Andrew

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I would not try to spray 2 part epoxy. in order to get it thin enough to spray the solvents would weaken the strength of the epoxy and compromise your lure.

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Thanks very much for the comments folks. I'll stick to brushing it on.

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I am primarily a saltwater fisherman and have more freshwater lures than I will use in my lifetime so I only repair and repaint the saltwater ones as they take the hardest beating.

I have used Rust-Oleum Tub & Tile two part Epoxy-Acrylic with an airless sprayer to paint base coat white on old stainless, silver plate, and cast iron Tady, Salas, Iron Jigs, and spoons. It is used to repair tubs and tub enclosures, looks and feels like porcelin, doesn't yellow, and has superior adhesion in water. It only costs $30 and you can get it at Home Depot. If you brush it on, it is self leveling and looks almost as good a spraying. I have not mixed any acrylic colors with the base but they should work.

This is not waterbased. It comes in two cans. One Quart of white base and a smaller can of pure clear Xylene. It is dangerous to breathe and requires a respirator. There is enough to last a lifetime. It will cover 70-112 sqft of surface area. That is thousands and thousands of lures.

I mixed some up 4:1 a new stainless bowl. Forget about cleaning it out once it hardens. You can hit with a hammer and it doesn't chip out. This stuff can be thinned to spray with a Wagner or HVLP conventional sprayer but I haven't tried that.

One tip, after you spray (brush) the first coat (may not need a second) it is better to spray (brush) the second within two hours to have the paint adhere to the first coat and not just overlap it.

After that paint it with acrylic paints with artistic flair.

In my personal experience it it not the base coat material that is as critical as the topcoat. As long as the basecoat has good adhension and is not going to be subjected to 2000 degree heat it will work fine.

:yay: I highly recommend two clear topcoats if you are serious about protecting your lures in saltwater. One, Nyalic Polymer Resin (nyalic.com) two part nylonic epoxy is used on the Space Shuttle, commercial aircraft, U.S. Navy vessels, etc. It can be bought in an aerosol spray can or by the gallon.

:yay: Or try Progressive Epoxies (epoxyproducts.com) Wet/Dry No Blush Epoxy Clear with Kevlar for boat builders and bulletproof your lures. 12 oz sampler $16.00.

I have dragged these lures for months in the Sea of Cortez fishing yellowfin, dorado, roosterfish, wahoo, and other toothy fish. Most still look like new. Most have bite marks.

Hope this helps.

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