Hoodaddy

New drying motor

31 posts in this topic

Quick calculation, might like to confirm.  Looks like if the motor shaft is 1/4" and you mount the motor to a base and make or buy a 1" pulley for the turner you should be in the 3.5 RPM range.  Should be easy to spin it with a larger diameter O-ring.  Just run the o-ring on the motor shaft unless you are turning several large baits at once.

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This flat/dead spot has been well documented over the years. I don't recall anyone coming up with a solution. Don't bother replacing with a new motor, it is a design fault that exists in them all. Probably all made by the same company.

 

Dave

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Here's something to try. With nothing attached to the rotisserie grab the output shaft and try to spin it back and forth with your fingers. If you feel any slack that is what is known as "backlash". Gears have to have a certain amount of clearance between them to keep them from binding and wearing out prematurely. If they are too tight you get increased friction which wears the gears out prematurely as well as putting excess stress on the motor which also shortens it's life. Too much clearance and you get the problem your experiencing that shows itself as a "drop" when unbalanced weight moves to the downward side of the rotation and gravity takes over.

 

Shimming the gears, either farther apart or closer together, is the only way to correct "backlash". I know of nothing that can be done to correct this problem in a sealed unit such as a rotisserie. About all you can do is buy a new turner motor and hope for the best.

 

Ben

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If anyone looking for a new motor,its worth having a look at 60ktyz synchronous motors.Can be bought direct from china or from amazon. Available in various r.p.m, powerful and reliable.

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I got around the issue of keeping the wheel in the drying motor by building a simple linkage. I cut the shaft in two, ground a tongue and groove into it to re-mate it, drilled a hole, and used a nail cut off and held in place with a tiny neodymium magnet to keep it in place. The part driving the wheel is held in place by a shaft collar and set screw. 

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IMGP4924_zpsznf9q3r2.jpg

 

IMGP4923_zpsobt6b0qk.jpg

Edited by jigginpig
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