finlander

adhesive for the foil...

20 posts in this topic

I've reaad of spray adhesive and i have used Devcon under it. Odor of the spray stops me from using it during the winter indoors. Would a glue stick work? I would clearcoat it immediately after. Thanks.

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Use the foil tape finlander...it's much easier. They use the tape for duct work around furnaces and such...I buy it here and about any hardware store. There are several kinds tho and some work better than others. Make sure you burnish down the edges really smooth before clear-coating otherwise you won't have a smooth finish.

RM

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Use 3M Super 77 spray adhesive. I suggest that you try this method and the foil tape also. The foil tape is the heavier of the two, so take that into consideration. There is nothing difficult about spraying adhesive on a piece of foil, and this method allows for experimentation with different foils. The more round that the lure is, the more the lighter foils have the advantage IMO. Keep a sharp craft knife handy for trimming. The more you foil a particular lure pattern, the easier it gets, as you will learn to cut the foil pieces more accurately to begin with, eventually developing accurate patterns which leave you with very minimal trimming.

Dean

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I have picked the foil tape butt it is much heavier than anything I want to use. With winter here I dont want to use the spray indoors as I have parrots that might suffer if the smell permeates the house. What is a little irritating to us can kill them. So i just saw the glue stick sitting here and thought about it. The foil tape I might try later on larger baits. It seems too thick. Is that backing removable?

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You know one problem I had with spray on adhesive Dean is that it wouldn't cure under the foil. I would spray it on, attached the foil and an hour later it was still not dry and the foil would slide around. Have you had this problem?

jed

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I haven't noticed that Jed, but I've been hanging mine in heat flow and not getting back to them for 3-4 days, and they've been fine. I' ll make a point to check and see how long it's taking to set-up. Most of your lures are about 4 times bigger than mine, which should have an effect on cure time also. Did you ever check to see exactly how long it was before yours set-up?

Dean

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I used Office Works Glue Stick to do the foil on a few baits recently. One of the plugs I foiled was small (a little over 1/8 oz) and I felt the tape would add too much weight. I used some candy wrapper foil (real thin) on that one and the light reynolds wrap foil on the others. Seemed to work fine. Epoxy over top, then paint and epoxy again. Worked real well. The real question is how it will hold up. These are the first plugs that I have foiled, so I really do not know if it will hold up to fishing. I'll know in a few months!!

Andrew

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We've been using candy foil for about 3 yrs.with the 3M spray adhesive and have yet to have a problem with it setting up under the foil...but, what I do is cut the pieces, spray them, let them almost dry and then foil the bait. Have'nt had a problem with them holding up to any kind of treatment. A lot of times I fish a C/B anywhere I will throw a jig.

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As hoodaddy says, Jed, if you let the 3M spray get tacky before applying, I don't think you will have any problem.

I used it on some gold foil wrapping paper, with two baits recently, and had no problems. Getting ready to do it on 7-8 more real soon.

Now, does anyone know where I could get some of this candy foil? Looking for some yellow (chartreuse) foil in particular.

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Craft shops carry foil that is very similar to gold leaf. It comes in extremely thin sheets and is really easy to use.

You spray the glue on, dab the foil to the bait and sort of brush the excess away with a cloth or stiff brush. If you miss a spot or two you just dab some more on the areas you missed.

It comes in a variety of patterns/colors but I haven't seen yellow. Gold, copper, and silver patterns are common.

Here's a type of gold I tried:

goldpinkshad.jpg

You glue it, clear over it, and then paint or apply Husky's tissue photorealism techniques.

Easy stuff really.

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Candy foil can be found a cake and candy suppliers. I guess you'll just have to do a search in your phonebook for someone in your area or try someone who makes cakes for weddings. We have one not too far from me and I've seen gold,silver,blue ,pink, and purple but no charteuse.

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did somebody tried using cigarette packet foil?...it's thin , I'm not a smoker, but I camed with the idea after I saw that it has a thin layer of paper over the yellow or silver foil that can be glued ... yet I didn't tested for good...only with a gold one but I destroyed it trying to cut some shapes ...

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Trying to make crankbaits as to the method described by Husky, I came across problems in finding the right materials. I couldn't find a spray adhesive, so I had to replace it with some other kind of glue. I found a glue which is used mostly for flexible bonds, such as for rubber, leather, but it can be used successfully for many other materials. You have to apply a thin layer on both parts, wait a few minutes until it dries, then press the two parts together. I think you call this glue "contact cement". I use my finger to obtain such a thin layer, on both the plug and the foil. After applying it, you do not have problems with glue drying time, the crankbait being ready for painting or clearcoating as soon as you finish glueing the foil.

The cigarette packet foil can also be used on crankbaits. I made many such crankbaits. The paper which is on the back sticks well, using many types of glue. Once I had a surprise, when fishing a crankbait with cigarette packet foil on it, the foil went apart. The water "travelled" through the thin layer of paper, but this accident was not due to the foil, it was caused by the poor cearcoat I used

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:yay: Ken is right on about that foil. It is called BriteBak and it works really well. The gold really pops....Here is a crank I made using the gold. The picture really doesn't do it justice.

Rod

IMG_1278.jpg

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Are we supposed to take your word for it? I'm PMing you my mailing address so you can send it along for further scrutiny!:lol: Primo work,:yay:

:yay: Ken is right on about that foil. It is called BriteBak and it works really well. The gold really pops....Here is a crank I made using the gold. The picture really doesn't do it justice.

Rod

IMG_1278.jpg

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rj, that looks awesome!

As everyone else has said in different ways, you can use just about any glue to secure about any type of foil around a bait. Elmer's spray adhesive works fine (thanks, Husky), as does every other spray adhesive I have tried. Wait for the tackiness, and try to make sure none of the glue slops over to the outside of the foil. It's easier to avoid the mess than clean it up.

I find it easiest to lay the foil down on a surface (you might try laying it on a sheet of paper to collect overspray) and spray the adhesive on the foil. Then carefully wrap the bait. For me the set time is only about five minutes or so before I'm comfortable painting or topcoating.

If you aren't happy with the foil, strip it off and have another go at it. On the second try you'll need less spray on the foil since there's already some soaking into the wood.

The real key is protecting it once it's on...whether with devcon or other product. Don't know bout all you guys, but I always use at least two topcoats. Mainly because I drill the screw holes after the first one, then seal really well around the shank afterward with the second coat.

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