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Don'ts for Newbies


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#21 doomdart

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Posted 18 March 2007 - 10:55 PM

Do not pour hot plastic on your leg.


Well, the burn looks sick. But what is more disturbing is the skin and hair around it. TMI........sorry for the pain.

#22 Grimlin

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 11:20 AM

Alot of the links are not working.When starting out on first pour,the plastic needs to be shaken first?Is there a step by step page somewhere that will help this first timer?

Any advice will be much,much appreciated!

Thanks,
matt

#23 BBC

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 11:42 AM

grimlin,

Last time I looked, Del had step by step directions posted in the forum on his website - del-mart.com . Depending on who's plastic you're using you may want to stir it rather than shake it. I used to use Calhaun plastic and had to use a paint stirrer on my drill to mix it. If you shake it you tend to get lots of bubbles in the plastic when you heat it. I shake the MF plastic that without any problems though. I guess it's just the nature of the beast.

Eric

#24 rhahn427

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 10:15 PM

Don't heat lead outside if there is a chance that a drop of moisture could fall into the pot ....... it WILL cause an explosion of 600 degree lead that will cause a scar ........ and if that's all ........ thank your God profusely ....... saw it happen ......... luckily only a small scar on a friend ........ Thank you God ......

#25 Zbass

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 05:20 PM

Always pay close attention to what you are doing. DO NOT GET DISTRACTED. It could result in burnt plastic or worse, a fire with toxic fumes.
Zbass

#26 Tman2

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 04:23 PM

Here's one- don't use warm water for mixing your POP. It GREATLY reduces workable time. :boo:


But, now, I know! :yay:

#27 makohunterz

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 10:25 PM

HI I am new to this website but have been looking at lure making for some tome, and I was wondering what is the cheapest price you have seen RTV plastic for? Thank You for any help this website is awsome

#28 kbbaits

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 04:34 PM

I notice a difference when pouring baits on a wet humid day versus on a dry warm day. So if I want to pour while it is humid or wet out I have to close the garage and turn on the exhaust fan. The plastic seems to flow better when it's dry out. :twocents: KB:yay:

#29 Senkosam

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Posted 30 May 2009 - 06:37 AM

  • To emphasize what Zbass said, always pay attention to heating plastic, whether in the nuker or on the hot plate. Burning plastic fumes will burn your lungs and eyes, cause your throat to close up and swell, possibly resulting in DEATH!! You must use a vent to the outside because no one knows the carcinogens in the plastic.
  • Preheated plastic takes less time to liquify
  • Overcooking plastic results in glitter shrinkage, color bleed and pale to a gray color flakes. The more times plastic is reheated at high temps, the greater the glitter loss in size and color
  • The more you heat metal molds, the hotter they are to handle. I use a heavy spring clamp, even for the first pour, and keep my hand away from the mold. My hand is steadier.
  • By all means use more softener as a rule if adding salt. Salt firms a bait and some manufacture's plastic has more hardener in it to start with. Test the cured plastic for softness after 24 hours and then, one week after pouring to see if the final softness is maintained. A hard plastic has less action.
  • The more translucent the color, the less glitter needed.
  • A mix of glitter sizes gives different effects. Observe Zoom's color 54 which a mix of .015 and .040 red and black flakes. Look at other attractive baits by other large companies. No one has a patent on glitter use.
  • Original Fish Formula oil sold by Bass Pro is the cheapest worm oil out there and the baitfish formula smells nice, counteracting the stink of plastic.


#30 ROWINGADUBAY

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 03:12 AM

I am new to plastic pouring and learned this the hard way NEVER HEAT WITH A FLAME!!!! I was using a coleman stove on low everything seemed good but I made my first pour set the pot back on the stove and a flame shot up the melted plastic "string" that hung over the lip of the pot and started the whole pot on fire lucky I had a lid to snuff it out can't imagine doing this indoors with the fumes and flamibility of hot plastic.
BE SAFE!!!!!
George

#31 Vodkaman

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 03:57 AM

I too had to redecorate last year. Definately no naked flames.

In fact, I'll say it again.

NO NAKED FLAMES!!!

Thanks for posting.

Dave

#32 Koolwind

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Posted 25 July 2009 - 01:13 PM

Any feedback on sources and pricing for RTV?????

HI I am new to this website but have been looking at lure making for some tome, and I was wondering what is the cheapest price you have seen RTV plastic for? Thank You for any help this website is awsome



#33 Husky

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 08:31 AM

Any feedback on sources and pricing for RTV?????

Greer on Ebay fo larger amounts. For 1/2 Rounds (1 piece molds) you can use Silicone sealant with water @ $2.97 for 10 oz.


#34 bluegrasslover

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 02:40 PM

This is probably a no brainer but I use the oven set at 350 for about an hour to dry my POP molds. I got busy the other day and left them in for about 1.5 hours. They were some of the best molds I had made but they pretty much just crumbled apart. Too dry I assume.

#35 bluegrasslover

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 02:44 PM

When using POP to make a 2 part mold....I was pouring the POP for the second part directly onto the baits I was making a mold for. I kept getting lots of bubbles around the baits. I started pouring the POP into a corner and letting it flow over the baits and it completely eliminated the bubbles.

#36 Vodkaman

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 11:02 PM

BGL. There is a temperature limit for PoP 150C (302F), beyond this temperature, the gypsum (cured mold) is converted back to plaster of Paris, resulting in a powdery mold and is spoilt. I suspect that this is what has happened in your case.

Reduce the oven temperature to its minimum, also, try wedging the door open an inch or two.

The maximum weight of water removed from the PoP is close to 35%. If you weigh the freshly poured mold on kitchen scales, multiply this figure by 0.7 (30% weight loss), this new figure is your target weight. Just take the mold out of the oven occasionally and monitor the weight. Cooking the mold beyond this figure is pointless, as you found out.

When you pour plastic, you are exceeding this temperature limit. But you have sealed the mold with elmers or some other product. This has bound the surface together and prevents the crumbling. Other than the surface, the rest of the body of the mold does not get that hot, as PoP is a very good heat insulator.

If the problem persists, consider the PoP dryer project that I posted a few months back. Not as fast as the oven, but fast enough to be convenient and perfect molds every time.

Dave

Edited by Vodkaman, 07 December 2009 - 11:04 PM.


#37 bluegrasslover

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 04:25 PM

BGL. There is a temperature limit for PoP 150C (302F), beyond this temperature, the gypsum (cured mold) is converted back to plaster of Paris, resulting in a powdery mold and is spoilt. I suspect that this is what has happened in your case.

Reduce the oven temperature to its minimum, also, try wedging the door open an inch or two.

The maximum weight of water removed from the PoP is close to 35%. If you weigh the freshly poured mold on kitchen scales, multiply this figure by 0.7 (30% weight loss), this new figure is your target weight. Just take the mold out of the oven occasionally and monitor the weight. Cooking the mold beyond this figure is pointless, as you found out.

When you pour plastic, you are exceeding this temperature limit. But you have sealed the mold with elmers or some other product. This has bound the surface together and prevents the crumbling. Other than the surface, the rest of the body of the mold does not get that hot, as PoP is a very good heat insulator.

If the problem persists, consider the PoP dryer project that I posted a few months back. Not as fast as the oven, but fast enough to be convenient and perfect molds every time.

Dave


Thanks for the great information. I'm assuming that 1 hour in an oven set at 350 that has not been preheated (this is what I've been doing) never gets the mold over that magic number because they have been turning out really good. It could be relative to the thickness as well...ie, if my molds were thinner then they would reach a temp over 302. I have had good luck with my procedure but I am going to take your suggestion and lower the temp just to make sure. Who knows, maybe the ones that appear to be good won't last as long or something...Thanks, Greg

#38 Vodkaman

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 06:11 PM

You are probably right, the thinner mold would be the problem. It dries out quicker and then heats up faster.

The water in the mold would prevent the mold from over heating. But once the moisture is gone, it heats up. Once the majic temperature is reached, it does not mean your mold is instantly ruined, but the deterioration process begins. I could not find any information on time scales involved in the process. There is a lot of information on this reversal process on the web, which is where I got this information.

Good luck with your molds.

Dave

#39 mainbutter

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Posted 03 February 2010 - 07:27 PM

Don't start pouring your own plastics.

It's addictive and will drain your wallet.

Just like fishing :P

#40 orionn1

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:27 PM

I am a newbie, If I want to pour a swimbait with two colors do I have to do it with a single top pour mold only? Can you use a two piece mold
regards
rob

Edited by orionn1, 31 March 2010 - 11:27 PM.